Celebrating a Culture of Health for Latinos



Two majority-Latino communities are among the eight winners of this year's Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize. Chelsea, MA (62% Latino) and San Pablo, CA (55% Latino) were chosen from 200 applicants along with Algoma, WI, Allen County, KS, Garrett County, MD, Richmond VA, Vicksburg, MS, the Seneca Nation of Indians in Western New York. These communities made strong efforts to ensure their residents have the opportunity to live healthier lives. Winning communities get a $25,000 prize and will have their inspiring stories shared by RWJF. “For the past five years, RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities have inspired hope across the country,” said Dr. Richard Besser, RWJF President and CEO in a news release. “We welcome these eight new prize ...

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Tick Tock: The Impact of DACA on Latinos


latino-kid mental health

President Donald Trump's administration recently rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an American immigration policy signed by President Barack Obama five years ago. DACA allows unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children to work, go to school, and get a driver’s license without fear of deportation. The clock is now ticking for a Congressional fix for people who qualify for DACA. If not, recipients could lose their status starting March 5, 2018. Who are DACA recipients? Since the program started in June 2012, most DACA recipients are in Latino-centric states: California (222,795) followed by Texas (124,000) and Illinois (42,376). Unauthorized immigrants from Mexico make up more than three-quarters of all DACA ...

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A Unique Way to Help Latino Families Avoid Unneeded ER Trips



Too often, a lack of healthcare coverage forces Latinos into the emergency room for non-emergency healthcare. Now, thanks to a new grant, the Center for Healthy Neighborhoods at California State University-Fullerton (CSUF) will create a promotores program to help local Latino families avoid unnecessary ER trips, according to The Orange County Register. Why are ER trips an issue? The community in Fullerton, Calif. (35.24% Latino population), faces numerous obstacles that prevent them from obtaining quality health care, which leads to extremely high rates of preventable ER visits, according to Kaiser Health Foundation-Anaheim. These obstacles include being “linguistically isolated,” lacking awareness, and affordability. How the new program will reduce ER trips The $40,000 ...

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Latino Group, U.S. Army Team Up to Promote STEM among High Schoolers



The science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce is no more diverse than it was 20 years ago. In fact, less than 2% of the STEM workforce is Latino youth, although they make up about 20% of the population, according to a factsheet by the U.S. Department of Education. Vacant STEM jobs and gaps in this growing career field mean gaps in income, health, and quality of life. It also means Americans lag behind in: advancing alternative energy source curing diseases predicting natural disasters preventing cybercrime protecting our citizens securing sustainable food supply In order to promote STEM careers among Latino youth, we need to improve STEM programming beginning as early as preschool, promote STEM programs for Latinos, and boost high school ...

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How Hispanic Heritage Month Became a Thing


latino kid mariachis

At Salud America!, we're excited to discuss Latino health during Hispanic Heritage Month! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. How did this observance start? U.S. Rep. Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles introduced legislation on the topic. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover its current 30-day period. President Ronald Reagan implemented the expansion. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988. Why is the date of this observance important? Sept. 15 is significant ...

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Webinar: Walking Toward Justice



Housing segregation caused many social justice issues throughout the 1900s. One big one is neighborhood walkability. You are invited to join America Walks’ quarterly webinar series, Walking Toward Justice, to examine past and present walkability issues in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color, and search for solutions. Charles T. Brown of America Walks, who helped create the series, will moderate each webinar. The first webinar on 9/27/17 Register here for the first webinar of the series, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Government Segregated America, at 2 p.m. EST Sept, 27, 2017. The webinar will feature author Richard Rothstein. Rothstein’s book debunks myths about racial discrimination. It also provides evidence of how governments prevented ...

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Nearly 30 Million Americans are Still Uninsured



There is good news and bad news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) when it comes to new data on the U.S. and health insurance. First, the good news. The country saw a decline in the number of uninsured adults of nearly 500,000 from January through March of 2017, compared to the same time frame in 2016. Now, the bad news. Nearly 9% of the population are still without insurance, especially Latinos. This translates to almost 28 million people, according to a report from the CDC. “[The drop of nearly 500,000] from the same period last year … isn’t considered a significant change,” the CDC said in the report. Insurance & Latinos Latinos have made great strides in recent years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with the ...

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Study: Latinos Are Closing the Big Gap in Access to Healthcare


latino doctor with patient

Latinos have far less health insurance coverage than their white and black peers. But disparities in access to healthcare have narrowed for Latinos, compared to whites, thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and healthcare.gov in English and Spanish, according to a new report. The Commonwealth Fund report shows: The uninsured rate for Latinos adults dropped by 12 percentage points from 2013 to 2015. That's a larger decline than among blacks (9 percentage points) and whites (5 percentage points). The share of Latino adults who skipped doctor’s visits because of costs decreased by 5 percentage points, from 27% percent to 22%. That's a larger decline than among whites (2 percentage points). The share of black and of Hispanic adults age 18 and older without a usual ...

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Back-to-School = Time for Kids to Get Covered


kids at school bus stop

Schools are welcoming back students for another year of education. It’s also the time of year for parents to think about getting children covered with health insurance. Latinos are currently the largest ethnic and racial minority in the United States. They are also the largest uninsured population in the country. As their population continues to grow, it is going to be crucial for all Latinos to have access to quality healthcare. This starts with Latino children. The Connecting Kids to Coverage campaign was created for purposes such as these. With the goal of helping parents and families find the resources they are eligible for, such as Medicaid and CHIP, the campaign has launched a series of online, bilingual resources. “The Campaign lets families know who is ...

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Mississippi Governor Urges Training Day Care Workers to Improve Early Education



The first few years are critical for preparing kids for life, yet early childcare employees are the least prepared. They often only have a high school degree, thus aren’t equipped to give kids the care and services they need during their formative years. Mississippi Governor, Phil Bryant, told residents at the Neshoba County Fair in July 2017 that he plans to improve early childhood education across the state by training day care workers. He hopes to use federal and state funds to provide training through the state’s 15 community colleges, at no cost to the workers, according to one source. According to Governor Bryant’s Twitter account, “Our community colleges are now educating our childcare workers on early childhood education best practices. Our children deserve the ...

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