California Has Urgent Need for Latino Nurses



According to the California Healthcare Foundation (CHCF), the state has a dire shortage of Latino nurses. A study found that the majority of nurses in the state are White or Asian, while 39% of the population is Latino and represent only 8% of the nursing pool. “Clearly we are lacking … [Latino] nurses,” said David Hayes-Bautista, Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA. “Having them in the workforce will … make for better patient care [and] better language communication.” In a population as diverse as California, where Latinos lack sufficient access to preventive care and experience higher rates of heart disease and shorter life expectancies than Whites. Financial support is a major barrier for many Latino students. Financial aid is ...

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New App Helps Latinos Compare Prescription Med Prices



A new app by the company LowestMed has been launched that will allow Latinos to compare prescription medicine prices. The app, called MediBajo, is the first of its kind specifically designed for the Latino community. The app utilizes user-friendly mobile technology to compare prescription drug prices at local pharmacies. “Prescription drug prices vary and many people end up paying too much or skip their medications simply because of the lack of pricing transparency,” said LowestMed CEO Brad Bangerter. “This can be an even bigger problem if there is a language barrier. We created MediBajo specifically for the 55 million Hispanics in the U.S. to help ensure they can compare prices at local pharmacies and get the best discounts available by using an app tailored to their own ...

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Study Shows Latinos Are Less Trusting of Physicians



A study by Emory University has found that Latinos are more likely to say that doctors are unconcerned about their health and do not see them as equals. The study, entitled “Disaggregating Ethnoracial Disparities in Physician Trust,” found that individuals of a particular race (such as Latinos) tend to have a similar point of view on physician trust. The study also found that this issue of trust had nothing to do with education level, income, or marital status. U.S. Latinos are less likely than whites to trust the interpersonal competence, technical judgment, and obligation to act ethically towards the best interest of the patient of their doctors. “By more closely measuring differences in physicians trust, we find key differences in how people in how people view their ...

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Dia de Salud Increases Health Equity in Latino Community in Oregon



Sarah Cantril started the Huerto de la Familia program to focus on boosting health equity by helping Latino families live healthier lives in Eugene, Ore. In trying a new approach to bring health information to Latino families, Julia Ridgeway-Diaz and other officials with Huerto de la Familia decided to start an annual health fair, called Dia de Salud (Health Day). This free, culturally tailored annual health fair brings Latino families together to receive free eye exams, blood tests, and other health services that would normally be unavailable to their community. What role do Latinos play in their health?  Huerto de la Familia has been assisting Latino immigrant and migrant families in Eugene, Ore. (7.8% Latino), since 1999, when Sarah Cantril formed the organization from a ...

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College Students Help Latinos in Fight against Diabetes



According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 50% of all post-Millennial youths will be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during their lifetime. Latinos are the group that is likely to be the most susceptible to the disease. Two nursing school students from Arizona State University (ASU), Tatianna Alvarado and Jamie Karch have taken on roles in a community-based diabetes prevention program aimed at Latino youths called “Every Little Step Counts.” “Many of my family members have diabetes and my mother is a type 2 diabetic,” Alvarado said. “The last year of high school I took care of her. I’d interact with her, told her what diabetes was … but there was only so much I could do as a daughter.” The program is funded by a $1.2 grant from the ...

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Over $23 Million Awarded to Reduce High Blood Pressure



Efforts to reduce health disparities among Latinos received a boost as $23.5 million was awarded for two new studies. Research teams from the University of Alabama and Johns Hopkins University were selected by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The two studies will compare ways to improve blood pressure and close the health disparities gaps experienced by Latinos. Previous research has rarely targeted these high-risk populations. “Even as health outcomes associated with blood pressure control have improved nationwide, striking disparities remain among racial and ethnic minorities, low-income individuals and rural residents,” said Dr. Romana Hanain-Wynia, Director of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Addressing Disparities Program. “This suggests ...

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New Standards Set in Translating Health Materials



As of the 2011 census, there are over 25 million people in the United States had limited English proficiency. This includes people born outside and inside the United States. Spanish is still the most spoken language in the U.S. after English. There is also an increase in other non-English languages and the U.S. is seeing a great movement towards diversification. This population shift has greatly impacted health equity and health literacy. There is literally a lack of ability to effectively communicate health care ideas and strategies to many of the patients who need the information the most. One strategy formed to address this issue has been translating health materials used by healthcare providers. While this seems on the surface a simple solution, the issue is not as ...

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NIAMS Launches Spanish-Language Website



The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease (NIAMS) has launched a new Spanish-language website that provides free health information on conditions of the bones, joints, muscles, and skin. “Many diseases in our scientific portfolio, including lupus, arthritis, and osteoporosis have profoundly negative effects among Latinos … in terms of prevalence and poor health outcomes,” said NIAMS Director Dr. Stephen Katz. “We are committed to providing quality health information to all people, no matter what language they speak or what culture they identify with.” The new site features easy-to-use navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals identify and locate NIAMS health topics. Some of the features offered include improved access to NIAMS ...

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Early Access Critical to Combatting Cancer for Latinos



According to the National Alliance for Hispanic Health and the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Hispanic cancer rate is overall lower cancer rates than in non-Hispanics. However, Hispanics have higher instances of cancers associated with infectious agents, such as stomach, liver, and cervical cancer. “Hispanics live longer than non-Hispanic whites and overall have a lower incidence rate of cancer than non-Hispanic whites,” said Dr. Jane Delgado, President and CEO of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. “These data need to be looked at as part of the larger picture of the health of Hispanics. To give dire warnings without offering resources for care and treatment is not only irresponsible but it is also unethical.” The research also found that early and comprehensive ...

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Program Receives $4 Million to Help Latino Infants



Family Futures, a program based in Western Michigan aimed at providing infants with a healthy start in life, was recently awarded over $4 million to expand its outreach to Latino families in the area. The program will receive funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to improve maternal health and child health among Latinos in Kent County, Michigan. Family Futures was created to improve the health of mothers and children and help in eliminating racial and ethnic disparities. The group provides outreach, case management, education, mental health services and fatherhood programs. “Strong Beginnings [and Family Futures] will help families navigate community services, addressing social determinants that might be barriers, and provide learning opportunities for families,” said ...

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