Tech Guru Brings Healthcare to Latinos in Houston


Dr. Peter Kim

Peter Kim is a sort of accidental convert to the world of telehealth. Kim was about to start his labor-intensive medical residency—but he also wanted to continue his work as a community health coordinator with Harbor Health Home in Houston. How could he do both? Telehealth. Kim began to further explore how to use telehealth to better support low-income Latino families in accessing healthcare to treat and prevent illnesses across Houston and beyond. Peter Kim already knew that a lack of access is one of the main inequities that keep many Latinos from obtaining the best quality healthcare possible. Technology as a healthcare tool In Houston, Texas (43.86% Latino population), the nation’s fourth-largest city, many Latino, Asian, and low-income families struggle to manage ...

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Streetsblog’s Sorriest Bus Stop Competition


Latino health safe routes equity

Two critical parts of every bus trip are the walk there and the walk back. Sadly, many streets are designed for cars, not families, making for some very sorry bus stops. Safe routes and safe bus stops are critical for people to access basic necessities, like schools, work, grocery stores, parks, healthcare, and other cultural and historical community resources. Streetsblog USA is calling attention to sorry bus stops during their 2017 Sorriest Bus Stop in America tournament. The goal is to motivate action from the streets and transit agencies who are responsible for designing and constructing the bus stops. You can enter the competition by submitting a photo of the sorriest bus stop with the exact location (preferably tagged in Google Maps) and a short description of what ...

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Register: Inaugural Latino Cancer Science Conference Feb. 21-23, 2018!


doctor and nurse

BIG ANNOUNCEMENT! Dr. Amelie Ramirez, leader of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio, is spearheading the Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos conference Feb. 21-23, 2018, in San Antonio. Latinos are expected to face a 142% rise in cancer in coming years. There is consistent evidence that higher amounts of body fat are associated with increased risks of a number of cancers, especially among Latinos. The inaugural Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos conference will unite health researchers, professionals, and leaders to tackle Latino cancer on many fronts. Register for the conference today! Submit an abstract for a poster presentation by Nov. 1, 2017. "We have seen substantial advancement in cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis and treatment over the ...

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City Looks to Increase Minimum Wage; Faces Resistance from State



Few factors are as important to a person’s health as their income. Millions of Latinos and other minorities struggle to make ends meet financially because of low-wage jobs. Low wages lead to housing instability, food insecurity, and poor health. In recent years, cities across the country have pursued efforts to raise the minimum wage so that workers will have a better chance of getting ahead, accumulating wealth, and provide better living environments for their families. One such example is found in Kansas City, MO (14.54% Latino population), in which voters overwhelmingly approved raising the minimum wage from $7.70 to $10 an hour. This would precede annual increases up to $15 by 2022. “We are so pleased that Kansas City has demonstrated a progressive political perspective ...

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Do Latinos Live in the Safest Cities in America?



It’s a fact. Where you live greatly affects your health. Live near a major road? A power plant? Or a densely populated neighborhood? Are you close to a supermarket? All of these factors – and more – impact your health on a day-to-day basis. For many low-income and Latino families, live in areas that have been classified as food deserts, with little to no access to healthy food options, safe places for physical activity, or access to quality health care. Many of these highly segregated areas are high in crime and poverty. The data analyzation web site, Niche, has compiled a ranking of the “Safest Places to Live” for 2017. How does this list impact Latinos? Most and Least Safe Cities in the U.S. By studying FBI reports on numerous crime factors in cities (9,932 of them) ...

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Why Everybody’s Free to Wear Sunscreen in New York


Getting ready for the beach

As temperatures blaze this summer, don't forget the water and the sunscreen! Latinos, who face a shockingly high risk of skin cancer, should wear head covering, sunglasses, and sunscreen to protect against the sun. What if you can't afford find or afford sunscreen, though? A cool new initiative in New York City (28.9% Latino population) offers free sunscreen dispensers in all five city boroughs, CityLab reports. “The mix of raising awareness about the problem of melanoma and providing a free preventive measure [sunscreen] is an easy step towards reducing skin cancer,” said Bright Guard CEO and Co-Founder Ryan Warren told CityLab. The Myth of Latinos and No Skin Cancer It is true that skin damage from the sun, which can lead to skin cancer, affects those with lighter ...

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The Growth of the Latino Population is Slowing Down


population of united states

While still on the rise, the annual growth rate of the U.S. Latino population has dropped from 3.7% in 2006 to 2% in 2017, according to new stats from Pew Research Center. U.S. Asians now account for the highest growth rate (3% in 2017). The black population rose slightly (0.9), while whites slightly decreased. Why the leveling off of Latino population growth? "Following a Hispanic population boom in the 1990s that was driven by immigration and high fertility rates, the Hispanic population’s annual growth rate peaked at 4.2% in 2001," according to Pew's Jens Manuel Krogstad. "It then started to decline as fertility rates fell and immigration slowed, a trend that accelerated during the Great Recession." But that doesn't mean the Latino population is in decline. Rather, ...

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New Affordable Housing Initiative Proposed for Austin



Where you live matters. There is no escaping how important that housing impacts an individual’s life. Where someone lives affects their income and education levels, their access to opportunities, and their overall health. In many “big cities” in the United States, housing costs force some low-income and Latino families to make difficult financial decisions. Many forgo medical expenses, utilities, and sometimes food in an effort to pay rent or mortgages each month. The city of Austin, Texas (34.5% Latino population), has earned a reputation as one of the most segregated cities in the country. In an effort to combat this unfortunate trend, the Austin City Council approved a resolution to “better spread affordable housing throughout the city,” reports the Austin ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/8/17: Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month


latina girl glasses

School supplies. New clothes. Meet the teacher. Are you ready for back to school?! Well, you may not be, if you also haven't scheduled eye exams for your family. Good vision and overall eye health are vital to learning and other aspects of health, yet Latino children are more likely than their peers to have vision problems. To celebrate Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month in August, let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, to tweet about the latest on Latino children’s eye health and how parents and others can improve children's vision! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat "Children's Eye Health and Safety Month" TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica Co-Host: American ...

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Report: Heavily Latino Cities Named Least Educated in U.S.



Latinos have historically lagged behind whites in education. They have made strides, like a declining dropout rate and increased college enrollment, but are still more disconnected (not in school, not working) and lag in college completion. Education is key to health, income, and the economy. That's why the financial website WalletHub analyzed 150 U.S. metro regions with nine factors—like public school quality and college graduate rates—to find the "most educated" and "least educated" areas. Unfortunately, the five least-educated areas were all heavily Latino. The McAllen-Edinburg-Mission metro area in South Texas (85.77% Latino) was the least educated city in the country. The area came in 150th on the Educational Attainment and 104th on the Quality of Education & ...

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