Low Wages Leave Many Latino Families in NV Struggling



Even as the unemployment rate continues to drop around the country – which is a clear positive sign for the economy – the situation for many Latino and low-income families is still very bleak. Approximately 1 in 6 households have zero or negative net worth, according to the financial website Prosperity Now. In the state of Nevada (27.53% Latino population), the financial situation for many families mirrors what is happening nationally. Large numbers of Nevada families are struggling with low-wage jobs that do not allow them to save, according to a report from Northern Nevada Business Weekly. Of the households in Nevada, nearly 44% are considered “liquid asset poor.” This means that they have so little funds saved that they could not live at the poverty level for three months ...

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Mexican Consulate Donates Funding for Latino Health in AZ



Latinos are the nation’s largest racial/ethnic minority group. They are expected to grow from 1 in 6 people today to 1 in 4 by 2035 and 1 in 3 by 2060. As their numbers continue to grow, the overall health of the Latino population is going to be vitally important to everyone in the United States. While Latinos made great strides in obtaining health care since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, they are still the largest uninsured population in the country and face numerous barriers and health inequities. In the heavily Latino-populated city of Yuma, Arizona (58.07% Latino population) a new champion and partner has emerged with a goal of increasing Latino access to health care. The Mexican Consulate of Arizona, based in Yuma, has donated over $35,000 in funds to the ...

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Latinos are Well-Represented in Both the Most & Least Educated Cities in the U.S.



Having an education, quite frankly, is very important. A person’s education level determines much about how their life will unfold. Education is associated with overall health, income level, career paths, access to resources, and housing. More and more Latinos are finding their way into two- and four-year colleges and universities, making great strides in education. As more and more schools develop programming to help Latino students succeed, the number of Latino college graduates is expected to steadily rise. The Economic Policy Institute proposed a theory stating that college degree holders earn more money and thus contribute more to a city’s tax base over time. With this in mind, the financial website WalletHub recently analyzed the 150 largest metropolitan areas in the ...

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Language Barriers Often Keep Latinos from Being Home Owners



Where people live determines a great deal; it impacts education, income, access to resources, and overall health. Home ownership is often a great source of pride for many individuals, including Latinos. However, many Latinos often run into significant barriers that keep them from becoming homeowners. One of the main barriers is language. Often times, Latinos are unable to find Spanish-language or even bilingual information that could help them in the home buying process. In Sioux Falls, South Dakota (3.31% Latino population), Spanish-language home-buyer education classes have been started by the Sioux Empire Housing Partnership to encourage the growing Latino population to become home owners, the Sioux City Journal reports. i The group now offers Spanish-language versions of ...

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Health Fair in St. Louis Geared toward Latinos



Latinos are already the nation’s largest racial and ethnic minority group. They are also the youngest and fastest growing. As communities change to reflect these new and evolving dynamics, Latino health is going to be critical to the country overall for generations to come. Despite their numbers, many Latinos face numerous inequities and barriers that keep them from obtaining the best healthcare possible. These include lack of access, lack of health insurance, language barriers, and cultural stigmas. “As the nation’s largest and fastest growing ethnic group, it's important that all Latinos have access to affordable healthcare,” said Jose Calderon, president of the Hispanic Federation in a news release. In an effort to remove some of these barriers, communities across the ...

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Texas Education Agency Creates Bilingual Materials for Latino Parents



Latinos have made great strides in education over the past decade. More and more Latinos are graduating from high school; dropout rates are at all-time lows, and even more are attending colleges and universities for the first time ever. Historically, one of the major obstacles in the way of Latinos attaining academic success have been language barriers. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has designed a new STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) report card that will share end-of-year test results that are bilingual and constructed in an “easy-to-understand format.” These report cards are mailed to parents and they can use their child’s unique code to log in and learn more at the Texas Assessment Management System website. There are practical resources for ...

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Community Center in Pittsburgh Creates Outreach for Latina Health



There are many barriers that exist that keep some Latinos from achieving the best health possible. Cultural stigmas, language barriers, and a lack of access are just some of these barriers. For Latinas, the problems can be even more frightening. Lack of insurance, lack of transportation, and even isolation are common problems that keep many Latinas from receiving medical treatment. At the Latino Community Center in Pittsburgh, PA (2.72% Latino population), has recognized this growing problem and has decided to do something about it, as reported by The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Using an idea based on the promotores de salud concept, the center has recruited and trained women to become “liaisons” in heavily Latino-populated neighborhoods in the city. These liaisons will ...

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Report: Many Latino College Students are Homeless, Hungry


homeless student

More Latinos are heading to college than ever before. The bad news is that the high cost of higher education often stands in the way of Latinos completing their college degrees. In fact, many students have to choose between tuition or food and housing. For example, 31% of Latino students are hungry, according to a study. A staggering 14% of students at 70 community colleges in 24 states were homeless, according to a survey by the HOPE Lab at the University of Wisconsin. Also 32,000 college applicants were in 2015-2016 identified as “unaccompanied homeless youth” on federal student aid forms, according to The New York Times. Los Angeles (49% Latino population) is a microcosm of college hunger+homelessness. Homeless & Hungry Currently, one in five of 230,000 ...

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Latino Parents Speak Up for Education in Tennessee



Education is one of the key social determinants of health. It has been tied to a person’s overall health, long-term financial well-being, and job attainment. Latinos have made great strides in education in recent years, with high-school dropout rates at an all-time low and enrollment in colleges and universities at all-time highs. However, for many Latino families, one barrier that keeps them from obtaining quality education is simply a lack of knowledge of the overall system. In Memphis, TN (6.69% Latino population), a group of parents banded together to help Latino families in keep up with the city’s fast-changing education landscape. They created Spanish-speaking classes as part of the Memphis Lift’s Public Advocate Fellowship. “Our mission is to make the powerless ...

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Large Numbers of Latino Kids at Risk for Toxic Stress


Sad child sitting on a window

Latinos report the highest levels of stress among groups, due to money, employment, and family and health issues, according to the recent American Psychological Association (APA) annual Stress in America survey. When it comes to stress and mental health, Latinos often go untreated or undiagnosed. Persistent stress in young children can become toxic, according to new research from the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress. This toxic stress has been shown to cause “brain changes” that can interfere with learning and lead to more problems in adulthood. The research was unable to pinpoint exactly how many children have been harmed to date by toxic stress, but the data showed that many live in circumstances that experts say “put them at risk.” Other findings ...

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