UC Irvine is the ‘Most Popular’ University in CA for Latinos



Latinos have made great strides in education in recent years, with more enrolling two- and four-year colleges and universities than ever before. Despite these gains, there is still a significant gap between Latinos and other racial and ethnic minorities in obtaining college degrees. Many universities around the country are coming up with new and innovative approaches to not only increase the enrollment of Latino students, but to also help them succeed when they get on campus. In all, 492 campuses in 19 states and Puerto Rico have been designated Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), which allows them to apply for about $100 million annually in federal research grants. For the University of California – Irvine campus, these strategies have begun to pay off. The Irvine (10.05% ...

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How a Short Task in Middle School Puts Latinos on a Path to College


latino school boy desk class student

A simple assignment has the power to sharply increase Latino middle-schoolers' chances of getting to college, researchers have found. The assignment? Write essays about your core values and why they are important to you. For the past few years, Stanford University-led researchers followed 81 Latino, 158 black, and control students in middle schools who wrote these types of essays—which can provide "self-affirmation," reinforce adequacy, and add resilience, John Timmer reports in Ars Tecnica. Researchers then compared these essay writers to other students who wrote on neutral topics, like their afternoon routine. For Latinos, the self-affirmation essay writers cut their risk in half of ending up on the remedial track, and they were more than twice as likely to end up ...

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6 Easy Ways Latino Families Can Get Healthier Mouths


dental health brushing teeth

Salud America! Guest Blogger Jefferson Dental Care Let's "face" it—the mouth is a good place to start helping your family develop healthy oral and general health habits. The mouth is not disconnected from our body. It affects us physically and psychologically. It shapes how we look, speak, chew, taste food and enjoy life. Studies have shown that poor oral health is linked to major health issues like cardiovascular disease, respiratory infections and diabetic complications. This is especially true for Latinos. 6 Big Tips for Better Oral Health To reduce the effects of poor oral health on your general health, there are several easy steps that you and your family can do proactively today. These quick habits adopted as a family, can improve well-being, as well as ...

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Classes in Illinois Look to Empower Latino Parents



Latinos are already the largest and youngest racial and ethnic minority group in the United States. The health and success of this growing population will be key to the overall prosperity of the country. Groups across the country have found numerous innovative ways to help Latinos obtain access to the resources available to them. In DeKalb, IL (12.81% Latino population) the Universidad para Padres (Parents University) program was formed to help parents in the area “take active roles in their own personal growth and their children’s academic success.” The program, which consisted of 22 sessions, was organized by Northern Illinois University (NIU) and covered a variety of topics. These included bilingual options for K-12 education to health promotion and applying for ...

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Univ. of Michigan to offer free tuition to some in-state students



Obtaining an education is one of the key social determinants of health. While Latinos have made great strides in this area in recent years – high school dropout rates are at an all-time low and two- and four-year college enrollments for Latinos is at an all-time high – Latinos still lag behind other racial and ethnic minorities in obtaining college degrees. The University of Michigan recently announced an initiative that could help many of the state’s Latino and low-income families achieve their goal of going to college. The school’s Board of Regents passed a program that will give free tuition for families who live in the state of Michigan (4.72% Latino population) and earn less than $65,000 per year. Dubbed the “Go Blue Guarantee,” the program will launch on January 1, ...

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What is the Fittest City in America?



Where you live has an undeniable impact on your overall health. Lack of access to spaces for physical activity, healthy food choices, and health care options often plague those that live in low-income neighborhoods. This includes many Latino families. This confluence of conditions often lead to residents becoming overweight and/or obese and suffering from diabetes, respiratory illnesses, and heart disease. In recent years, cities – often finding governments working with residents – have begun exploring ways to make cities healthier. This has included improving access to repairing sidewalks, adopting shared use agreements, and creating physical activity opportunities in public spaces. All of these efforts have not gone unnoticed. The fitness tracking application, Fit Bit, has ...

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Detroit Partnership Combines Literacy & Swimming for Kids


Latino Health Swimming Pools

Since 2010, Detroit Swims has taught more than 5800 kids how to swim and aims to teach all kids in the Metro Detroit. Swimming is excellent for mental and physical health, as well as academic achievement, but of f the 120,000 children in the city, it’s estimated 100,000 of them can’t swim, according to one source. Detroit Swims is a nonprofit started by lifeguards in 2010 at the Boll Family YMCA to reduce disparities in swim ability.  The lifeguards contributed $2000 out of their paycheck to teach the first 35 kids how to swim. Latino kids across the country often lack access to pools and swimming lessons, thus face higher rates of drowning and obesity related chronic disease compared to white kids. Detroit Swims has expanded to over six locations, and works with local ...

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The School-to-Prison Pipeline is Slowing in Texas



School suspensions are usually thought of as the last resort punishment for severe disruptions in the classroom. But did you know that children as young as three years old are being sent home for behavior problems which could have been addressed with positive school supports? In June of 2017, Texas House Bill 674 was passed which prohibits so called “discretionary suspensions” in Pre-K through 2nd grade children. These types of suspensions create a zero tolerance policy which studies have shown lead to higher rates of school dropout, lower academic performance, and decreased academic performance. This effect is widely known as the “School-to-Prison Pipeline”. Reasons for discretionary suspensions include horseplay, dress code violation, and violation of classroom rules.  This ...

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What is Health Equity? (and How to Get It)



Health equity can be a hard-to-understand concept. A new report has a clear, simple definition: "Health equity means that everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be healthier." Achieving health equity means removing obstacles to health. Obstacles like "poverty, discrimination, and their consequences, including powerlessness and lack of access to good jobs with fair pay, quality education and housing, safe environments, and health care," according to the report. The report is by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the University of California, San Francisco. Unfortunately, health equity sometimes doesn't exist. Latinos and other minority and low-income groups suffer health inequities and disparities. These are deeply rooted in socio-economic ...

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Healthcare Costs Level Out; Still Outpace Wages & Inflation



Despite significant gains made under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Latinos still remain the largest uninsured population in the country. A lack of access to health care has been one of the most persistent causes of health inequity for many Latino families. One of the main barriers to access is often the cost associated with health insurance. A new report has determined that the costs for healthcare may have leveled off, but that is not necessarily a positive. According to a report from PricewaterhouseCoopers' Health Research Institute (HRI), a “new normal” for medical costs has been determined. The HRI expects the medical cost growth to be 6.5% from where it is this year for 2018. “Even with net growth rate expected to hold at 5.5% for next year, [due to likely changes in ...

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