#SaludTues Tweetchat 9/26: Intersection of Walkability & Residential Segregation



Systematic housing segregation in the 1900s is the root of many social and environmental justice issues. One big one is inequity in neighborhood walkability, which leads to disparities in mental and physical health. Without safe places to walk, Latino families are robbed of opportunities to be healthy and thrive. Use #SaludTues on Sept. 26, 2017, to Tweet about potential solutions to improve walkability for all. Fueled by Richard Rothstein’s book, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Government Segregated America, and America Walks upcoming webinar series, Walking Towards Justice, we will be discussing the intersection of residential segregation and walkability. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Intersection of Walkability & Residential Segregation” ...

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Webinar: Walking Toward Justice



Housing segregation caused many social justice issues throughout the 1900s. One big one is neighborhood walkability. You are invited to join America Walks’ quarterly webinar series, Walking Toward Justice, to examine past and present walkability issues in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color, and search for solutions. Charles T. Brown of America Walks, who helped create the series, will moderate each webinar. The first webinar on 9/27/17 Register here for the first webinar of the series, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Government Segregated America, at 2 p.m. EST Sept, 27, 2017. The webinar will feature author Richard Rothstein. Rothstein’s book debunks myths about racial discrimination. It also provides evidence of how governments prevented ...

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An Analysis of Child Care Deserts by Zip Code in 8 States


Latino health early childhood development

Although research has shown the many health, social and emotional, and cognitive benefits of quality early child care and education, Latinos have the lowest participation in these programs. Why? Child care deserts may be the answer. Although affordability, work schedules, and waiting lists are also factors, location is often the first major consideration for families. Center for American Progress looked into the location of child care centers across eight states, which accounts for 20% of the population under age five. The authors define child care desert as a ZIP code with at least 30 children under the age of five and either no child care centers so few centers that there are more than three times as many children under age 5 as there are spaces in centers. See ...

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Texas City Drafts Budget to Funnel Funds through ‘Equity Lens’


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“Equity” is a term that means many things to many different people. For many Latinos, equity has been difficult to attain in many different areas. Healthcare, housing, education, and income are just some of the areas in which many Latinos face disparities and/or inequities. However, the City of San Antonio, Texas (63.34% Latino population), has recently made the topic of equity an issue to be tackled by the city government. San Antonio City Manager, Sheryl Sculley, presented the 2018 city budget recently and it will be the first to use an “equity lens,” according to a story by The Rivard Report. With the new equity lens, more city resources will be committed to areas and populations where the need is greater – often low-income and heavily Latino-populated areas that have ...

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Streetsblog’s Sorriest Bus Stop Competition


Latino health safe routes equity

Two critical parts of every bus trip are the walk there and the walk back. Sadly, many streets are designed for cars, not families, making for some very sorry bus stops. Safe routes and safe bus stops are critical for people to access basic necessities, like schools, work, grocery stores, parks, healthcare, and other cultural and historical community resources. Streetsblog USA is calling attention to sorry bus stops during their 2017 Sorriest Bus Stop in America tournament. The goal is to motivate action from the streets and transit agencies who are responsible for designing and constructing the bus stops. You can enter the competition by submitting a photo of the sorriest bus stop with the exact location (preferably tagged in Google Maps) and a short description of what ...

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Do Latinos Live in the Safest Cities in America?



It’s a fact. Where you live greatly affects your health. Live near a major road? A power plant? Or a densely populated neighborhood? Are you close to a supermarket? All of these factors – and more – impact your health on a day-to-day basis. For many low-income and Latino families, live in areas that have been classified as food deserts, with little to no access to healthy food options, safe places for physical activity, or access to quality health care. Many of these highly segregated areas are high in crime and poverty. The data analyzation web site, Niche, has compiled a ranking of the “Safest Places to Live” for 2017. How does this list impact Latinos? Most and Least Safe Cities in the U.S. By studying FBI reports on numerous crime factors in cities (9,932 of them) ...

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VIDEO: A Tale of Two Zip Codes



"When it comes to predicting how long you will live, your zip code is more important than your genetic code," George Takei narrates in A Tale of Two Zip Codes, an animated short film by the California Endowment's 10-year Building Healthy Communities initiative. Where you live determines your opportunities, thus your health and life expectancy. Consider not having healthy food options, clean air, safe sidewalks, nearby parks, quality schools, public transportation and preventive health care-the root causes lie in racial and economic discrimination. Struggling so much to find healthy options can be an overwhelming source of chronic stress, which is a serious health risk factor. If we are all going to be healthier, we need to look at inequality. Countries with the ...

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500 Cities Project: Local Data for Better Health


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How can you use data to improve health in your area? The 500 Cities dataset tries to provide an answer. The data set, which contains estimates of adult chronic disease, unhealthy behaviors, and preventive care for census tracts in 500 of the largest American cities, launched in 2016 thanks to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the CDC Foundation. The Urban Institute released a research report in May 2017 on how to use the data to reach change-making partners. Access the data set here and register for a webinar on Tuesday, June 13, from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. (EST) with Urban Institute to learn how to host a local event centered on the new 500 Cities neighborhood-level health data. Census tract-level data allows cities ...

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Life Expectancy for Latinos Differs by 20 Years in Some US Counties


Latino farm boy in poverty and food insecurity

Fact: Where you live greatly impacts how healthy you will be. Lifespans differs by as much as 20 years at birth between the longest- and shortest-rated counties United States, revealing massive health inequities in different parts of the country, especially Latino-centric area, according to a new study, CNN reports. For the study, researchers from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington in Seattle examined county data for life expectancy from 1980-2014. They then applied mathematical models to estimate the average lifespan. Findings showed life expectancy at birth increased by 5.3 years for adults (going from age 73.8 to 79.1) between 1980 and 2014. Over that time, men gained 6.7 years (going from age 70 to 76.7) while women ...

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Know A Young Texas Health Champion?



Calling all health champions ages 15-18! The Michael and Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living is awarding 2017 Texas Health Champions that are helping to prevent or deter obesity in their local town, cities, communities, or schools. The Award Ceremony will be held during the Texas Obesity Awareness week, September 11th through the 15th, 2017 in Austin and will honor young Texans (15-18) who have demonstrated exceptional leadership in the community in an effort to raise awareness and reduce the burden of the obesity epidemic. Awardees will also be highlighted on the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living website, blog and other media sources, to learn more or apply for the Rising Star Award, click ...

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