Newborn Screening Resources in Spanish



Almost 23% of the 3.99 million babies born in 2015 were Hispanic. Early diagnosis of certain conditions can make the difference between healthy development and lifelong physical or mental disability for these babies. Newborn Screening In 1963, Newborn Screening begins with a heel stick. Screenings identify babies who may have a variety of genetic, metabolic, hormonal and functional conditions so that precise follow-up testing can be performed. Since 1963, babies with serious but treatable conditions caught by Newborn Screening grow up healthy with expected development. All it takes is a few drops of blood and a simple hearing test. However, Newborn Screening is an evolving system that varies across the country, thus many parents don’t know of the conditions included in ...

Read More

Latino Group, U.S. Army Team Up to Promote STEM among High Schoolers



The science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce is no more diverse than it was 20 years ago. In fact, less than 2% of the STEM workforce is Latino youth, although they make up about 20% of the population, according to a factsheet by the U.S. Department of Education. Vacant STEM jobs and gaps in this growing career field mean gaps in income, health, and quality of life. It also means Americans lag behind in: advancing alternative energy source curing diseases predicting natural disasters preventing cybercrime protecting our citizens securing sustainable food supply In order to promote STEM careers among Latino youth, we need to improve STEM programming beginning as early as preschool, promote STEM programs for Latinos, and boost high school ...

Read More

#SaludTues Tweetchat 9/19: Healthy Weight & Healthy Kids



Happy #HispanicHeritageMonth! We're excited to celebrate Latinos, the largest racial/ethnic minority in the country, and highlight causes for health concerns and how to overcome them. For example nearly 40% of U.S. Latino kids are overweight or obese. These are higher rates than both white and black children, and places a big burden on the current and future state of Latino health. The good news is that healthy weight for healthy kids is an achievable goal. Use #SaludTues on Sept. 19, 2017, to tweet with us as we explore how to improve the health of Latino kids in schools and communities! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Healthy Weight & Healthy Kids TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica ...

Read More

The Science of Digital Content Curation at Salud America!


mobile social media tablet communication

The Internet is crazy huge. So, how can health communicators reach the right people with the right health messages? At Salud America!, we use "digital content curation" to raise awareness of the particular health issues that disproportionately burden Latino children and families, as well as promote solutions and build people's capacity to change these issues. Check out our new scientific article that explains how we "curate." Our approach to digital content curation Digital content curation is an emerging strategy that uses a systematic, refined process to create tailored online and social health messages and prevent mixed messaging and information overload for an audience. With massive amounts of content created across the Internet every minute, our Salud America! digital ...

Read More

Rick Carrillo Gives Latino Health a Starring Role for Salud America!


Rick Carrillo, Video, Salud America!

In the movie The Killing Strain, Juan “Rick” Carrillo plays a soldier who escapes a helicopter crash to lead a group of flu-epidemic survivors to safety. On screen, he was a nothing-can-stop-him hero. Off screen, Carrillo struggled fighting the elements—mountain cedar had him blowing his nose, taking antihistamines and using his inhaler between takes. “I wasn’t feeling 100%, but the scenes captured during filming were very effective in telling the story of this gutsy soldier,” Carrillo said. “This always reminds me the great power a camera has on creating a world for audiences to absorb and be part of.” Today, Carrillo uses his acting and film-making experience as a Video Production Manager for Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio, a national program that ...

Read More

Largest Urban Natural Area in Texas Gets Natural Playscape and Discovery Trail



Texas State Parks are opening new natural play areas for children and people with disabilities to play and connect with nature. Latino kids in Texas (39.1% Latino), and across the country, lack safe outdoor places to play and be active, which is known as a nature deficit disorder. Families struggle to find green space that is both fun and appropriate for all age ranges. Particularly Latino families, which are often multigenerational. Childhood development leaders, architects, educators and urban planners worked together to design plans for natural playscapes in various outdoor spaces, like state parks, local parks, zoos, and botanical gardens to better engage kids and families with nature. Natural playscapes are designed to be built using natural materials and include boulders, ...

Read More

Mississippi Governor Urges Training Day Care Workers to Improve Early Education



The first few years are critical for preparing kids for life, yet early childcare employees are the least prepared. They often only have a high school degree, thus aren’t equipped to give kids the care and services they need during their formative years. Mississippi Governor, Phil Bryant, told residents at the Neshoba County Fair in July 2017 that he plans to improve early childhood education across the state by training day care workers. He hopes to use federal and state funds to provide training through the state’s 15 community colleges, at no cost to the workers, according to one source. According to Governor Bryant’s Twitter account, “Our community colleges are now educating our childcare workers on early childhood education best practices. Our children deserve the ...

Read More

Health Workers Start Mega Baby Showers for Moms in Need



Kori Eberle calls early and steady prenatal care the “best gift a baby can receive” for healthy early childhood development. That’s why Eberle coordinates home visits, screenings, and parenting and health education for vulnerable women from pregnancy to their baby’s second birthday as part of the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District (Metro Health) Healthy Start program in San Antonio (63.2% Latino population). Eberle and Metro Health’s Healthy Start program want most of all to reduce disparities in the local infant death rate, which is higher for low-income, Latino, and African American families. Sadly, Eberle found that not enough moms-to-be know about their resources or get the help they need to ensure a healthy delivery and proper early brain ...

Read More

The State of Latino Obesity in the U.S.



Obesity rates are showing signs of leveling off, but rates among Latino adults and children remain much higher than whites, according to a new report. In nine heavily Latino-populated states, the adult obesity rates were at or above 35%, according to the 14th annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America report by Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Latino adults are more obese (42.6%) than their white peers (36.3%). Similarly, among children, Latinos have are more obese (21.9%) than their black (19.5%) and white (14.7%) peers, according to the new report. This means much work is left to promote a healthy weight. Adult Obesity by the Numbers This year, the adult obesity rates were over 35% in five states: ...

Read More

An Analysis of Child Care Deserts by Zip Code in 8 States


Latino health early childhood development

Although research has shown the many health, social and emotional, and cognitive benefits of quality early child care and education, Latinos have the lowest participation in these programs. Why? Child care deserts may be the answer. Although affordability, work schedules, and waiting lists are also factors, location is often the first major consideration for families. Center for American Progress looked into the location of child care centers across eight states, which accounts for 20% of the population under age five. The authors define child care desert as a ZIP code with at least 30 children under the age of five and either no child care centers so few centers that there are more than three times as many children under age 5 as there are spaces in centers. See ...

Read More