Early Head Start Services for Migrant Families


Latino health early childhood development head start

Not all kids start kindergarten equally prepared to succeed. By a child's third birthday, 85% of their brain is fully developed. Children of migrant workers and Latino children growing up exposed to adverse childhood experiences, such as domestic violence, substance abuse, neglect, and poverty, as well as limited access to healthy food and safe places to play, are at increased risk for developing physical, mental, behavioral, psychosocial, and/or cognitive issues. High-quality early childhood programs can help level the playing field for Latino children on vocabulary and on social and emotional development. With federal funding, the East Coast Migrant Health Start Project serves 3,145 children annually through 26 Head Start centers in Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, South ...

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Report: Disparities in child and adolescent mental health and mental health services in the U.S



According to a 2015 report published by the William T. Grant Foundation, 1 in 3 Latino kids live in poverty vs. 1 in 7 non-Latino white kids and 1 in 7 Asian children. Such differences are believed to be a central issue which compounds disparities in mental health. The report goes on to list 4 primary issues at the root of inequality in mental health including: Pervasive differences in family Socio-Econoimic Status; Adverse childhood experiences; Family structure; and Neighborhood-level Factors Read more about mental health and Latino ...

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