Childhood Poverty – What You Should Know



For millions, childhood poverty can have lifelong consequences that affect future health, education, financial earnings, employment, and more. According to a new report, one in five American children are classified as being “poor” and near two in five will be poor for at least one year before turning 18. These figures translate into nearly 29 million children. According to the Pew Research Center, there were 55.3 million Hispanics in the United States in 2014, making up 17.3% of the overall population in the U.S. Of this rapidly growing number, 23.5% were classified as living in poverty. The poverty numbers offer some stark and harsh realities. For infants born into poverty, nearly 50% will grow up to be “persistently” poor, spending at least half of their childhoods in ...

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Pre-K kids are Influenced by Unhealthy Marketing Shows New Study



Many Latino preschool kids deal with heavy advertisements of unhealthy food marketing and consume more sugary beverages and junk foods than their peers. Now a new study highlights the importance of healthier food marketing to kids of preschool age. The study reported on in Pediatrics found that food advertisement exposure may actually encourage more eating among the young, and depending on which foods are offered, could be adding to a risk for unhealthy weights. Sixty children ages two to five were given a healthy snack then asked to watch a 14-minute TV ad, half watching an ad about food, the other half watching an ad featuring a department store. They were then given an option after seeing the ads to consume more snack foods, where the kids who saw the food ad ate 30 more ...

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Breastfeeding Emoji is on the Way



In November 2015, the Unicode Consortium approved 51 new emoji's, and breastfeeding is one, according to Forbes. Based on requests and popular demand, the Unicode Consortium decides which emojis will be available for mobile devices, laptops, desktops and wearables. Interventions or policies aimed at improving breastfeeding rates among Latina mothers may be critical to promoting physical and mental health; however, Latina moms often face social, political, environmental, and cultural barriers to reach their own breastfeeding goals. In order to build a culture of health it is critical to support breastfeeding and empower women to live healthier lives. The emoji should be available in 2017. Spread the ...

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Mom Group Gives Swag Bags to Help Nursing Moms


Latino Health breastfeeding

After Nikki Van Strien delivered her first son in Mesa, Ariz. (30.5% Latino), she realized the discharge package given to all new moms by the hospital could undermine a woman’s breastfeeding goals by pushing formula. She wanted to do something to support breastfeeding moms immediately after delivery. In 2011, Van Strien and some other moms developed the AZ Breastfeeding Bag Project to provide all new breastfeeding mothers with a bag filled with educational material and breastfeeding supply samples. They became a non-profit and recruited volunteers and donations to reach new mothers birthing in the hospital, birth center, or home. Breastfeeding Rates Low in Arizona Nikki Van Strien, a new mom in Mesa, Ariz., wanted to connect with other moms for support. She joined a local group she ...

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Report: Disparities in child and adolescent mental health and mental health services in the U.S



According to a 2015 report published by the William T. Grant Foundation, 1 in 3 Latino kids live in poverty vs. 1 in 7 non-Latino white kids and 1 in 7 Asian children. Such differences are believed to be a central issue which compounds disparities in mental health. The report goes on to list 4 primary issues at the root of inequality in mental health including: Pervasive differences in family Socio-Econoimic Status; Adverse childhood experiences; Family structure; and Neighborhood-level Factors Read more about mental health and Latino ...

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Making the Case for Breastfeeding: The Health Argument Isn’t Enough


Latino Health Breastfeeding Equity Policy

We all know that breastfeeding saves live and money, yet many moms, especially Latina moms, do not meet their own personal breastfeeding goals. Why not? According to a framing brief by Berkeley Media Studies Group (BMSG), the story on breastfeeding is narrowly framed around a portrait of the mother and baby rather than the context of real women's lives in which it takes place. Consider why Starbucks' executives get lactation rooms, but baristas have to lock themselves in the bathroom to pump breast milk. Advocates should look beyond the portrait towards to the landscape-social, cultural, political, structural, and environmental factors that make it difficult to breastfeed, like lack of support in hospitals, insufficient time and space in the workplace, unfriendly businesses, ...

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Salud America! Wins ‘Best Health Advocate’ on Social Media


mobile social media tablet communication

Latino health rules! We're excited to announce we, Salud America! (formerly SaludToday), were named "Best Health Advocate Reaching Latino(a)s Through Social Media" by LATISM (Latinos in Social Media), a nonprofit promoting Latino tech innovation. Salud America! promotes Latino health awareness, stories, and solutions. Our Tweetchat series, #SaludTues at 1 p.m. EST each Tuesday, generates Latino health conversation, problem-solving, and resource-sharing among millions of Twitter users. We were nominated alongside two great organizations, @MinorityHealth and @CuidadodeSalud. "This award is important because it reinforces the importance of reaching Latinos with critical health messages, and recognizes three organizations that are working very hard to do just that," said Dr. ...

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The Urgency in Preventing Childhood Obesity with Physical Activity



Early recognition of overweight and obesity, by family and physicians, is crucial, particularly among Latino kids who have higher rates of obesity than whites. However, many Latinos don't understand how urgent childhood obesity is because of confusion between overweight and obesity and confusion about what obesity actually looks like. Parents Underestimate Child's Risk Parents, in particular, are often unable to correctly identify their child's weight status, thus underestimating their risk for many life-threatening diseases. Additional confusion, that leads to underestimation of health risk associated with obesity, is related to cultural beliefs that big babies are healthier than small babies, and that kids will "grow out of" obesity. Children don't "Grow Out of" ...

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Michigan Breastfeeding Network Supports Businesses that Supports Working Families



The Michigan Breastfeeding Network (MIBFN) develops and supports education programs, materials, and conferences that encourage breastfeeding in Michigan (4.9% Latino). One method is through their MI Breastfeeding-Friendly Business Project initiative to recognize companies in compliance with the federal Break Time for Nursing Mothers legislation and celebrate employers that go above and beyond federal requirements to support families. MIFBFN recognizes newly awarded businesses and creates positive press to encourage current, and future employees, clients, patients, patrons, stakeholders, partners, and all of Michigan to support businesses that support working families. MIBFN provides a press release  to distribute to local media outlets; provides a sample article for the ...

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CMS Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns Strategy II Initiative Second Annual Evaluation Report



Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released their second annual evaluation report for the Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns Strategy II Initiative. Strong Start is an initiative testing innovative prenatal care enhancements to improve maternal and infant health outcomes in low-income families, particularly to to reduce incidence of preterm birth and low birth weight. Among findings regarding lower rates of cesarean sections are higher rates of breastfeeding than national averages among similar populations. This is likely due to prenatal care enhancements that addressed psychosocial needs, such as care coordination, referrals to local resources, prenatal health education, and peer support for CHIP and Medicaid eligible women. For example, the Special ...

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