Latina Mom and Baby Health Research: Future Research


latina mom with baby food bottle

This is part of our Latina Mom and Baby Health: A Research Review » Future research needs Childhood obesity continues to be an ongoing epidemic in the U.S., especially among Latino youths. While many of the potential policies and interventions discussed in this review have been investigated in the literature in low-income or WIC-enrolled populations, many have not been thoroughly investigated directly in Latino populations. In order to further support the policy implications described herein, it will be important for investigators to provide further clinical evidence that these approaches are capable of affecting positive changes in childhood obesity endpoints in Latino infants and preschool-aged children. Future studies are particularly needed in the areas of paid parental ...

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Latina Mom and Baby Health Research: Policy Implications



This is part of our Latina Mom and Baby Health: A Research Review » Conclusions Early infant feeding habits surrounding breastfeeding and formula supplementation can impact childhood obesity among Latino youths. State and federal policies may be able to improve exclusive breastfeeding rates and duration by promoting support for breastfeeding in hospitals, childcare centers, workplaces, schools and public areas. Latina women may not be meeting recommendations for physical activity and/or gestational weight gain during pregnancy, and there is a need for increased education of expectant Latina mothers by their physicians. By increasing physical activity and reducing gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy, childhood obesity rates may be positively affected. As poor eating ...

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Latina Mom and Baby Health: A Research Review



Abstract One of four U.S. kids is already overweight or obese by age 2-5, with a higher prevalence among Latino kids (30%) than white kids (21%). How can we promote a healthy weight by kindergarten? Mothers’ physical activity and healthy eating habits before and during pregnancy play a big role. Breastfeeding also has many positive effects on children. Interventions or policies aimed at improving breastfeeding rates, while reducing formula marketing, among Latina mothers may be critical to promoting healthy weight goals. Healthy eating and physical activity habits established during early childhood care settings also is a stepping stone toward lifelong health. Read the Issue Brief in English (PDF) Read the Issue Brief in Spanish (PDF) Contents Introduction & ...

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Baby Café Brings ‘Breastfeeding Peer Counselors’ to San Antonio Moms



Infant nutrition experts Norma Sifuentes and Diana Montano have promoted breastfeeding for 30 years combined in San Antonio, Texas (63.2% Latino). The two women, employees of the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District’s Women, Infants and Children (SAMHD-WIC) department, know that breastfeeding duration rates are low here. Less breastfeeding means more risk of  obesity, diabetes, and lower IQs. So Sifuentes and Montano worked together to create a place—a haven—to help low-income Latina and all mothers access breastfeeding support and peer counseling. Why isn't breastfeeding more prominent? The benefits of breastfeeding are numerous. For babies, it reduces risk of infectious diseases, asthma, atopic dermatitis, childhood leukemia, diabetes, obesity and sudden infant ...

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Clinical Interventions to Promote Breastfeeding by Latinas: A Meta-Analysis



Breastfeeding initiation and duration rates are lower among Latinas than whites because they face more social and environmental barriers to breastfeeding, culturally unique barriers, and lack of access to health care providers and lactation specialists. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to systematically review the documented effectiveness of clinical breastfeeding interventions among Latinas to increase breastfeeding initiatiion and duration. "The team found that interventions of moderate intensity (three to six contacts) and those that started before the baby was born and continued afterward were most effective," according to one source. Breastfeeding duration is associated with reduce risk for obesity; therefore, it is important to implement effective breastfeeding ...

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US Could Take Breastfeeding Tips From Brazil



Only 16 percent of US mothers breastfeed exclusively at six months, although it is lower for US Latina mothers. However, more than half of Brazilian mothers breastfeed exclusively at six months. Differences in breastfeeding rates are likely due to much more aggressive breastfeeding promotional efforts as well as much more social and legal support. For example, according to one source, Brazil bans the advertising or promotion of infant formula, and in March 2016, the city of São Paulo passed a municipal ordinance that fines businesses and organizations if they prevent women from breastfeeding in public. Additionally, there are over 200 milk banks across the country for women who can't produce enough breastmilk of their own. Unfortunately, many US Latino mothers face social and ...

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Supporting Working Moms Act



Sponsored by Jeff Merkley (Dem) of Ore., a bill to amend Section 13(a) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 213(a)) regarding reasonable break time for nursing mothers has been assigned to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. The bill was originally introduced in the House in May 2013, but died. It is critical to support breastfeeding through policy rather than rhetoric. Nursing mothers face numerous individual, social and environmental barriers to breastfeeding, which is why breastfeeding duration rates at three, six, and twelve months are drastically lower than breastfeeding initiation rates, particularly among Latina mothers. Breastfeeding is associated with numerous health benefits for mother and infant, such as reduced risk for obesity; ...

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Barriers and Contributors to Breastfeeding in WIC Mothers: A Social Ecological Perspective



The Barriers and Contributions to Breastfeeding in WIC Mothers: A Social Ecological Perspective study used the social ecological model to assess positive and negative factors that influence breastfeeding initiation and duration in Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants in New Hampshire. Previous research has shown that Latino mothers have lower breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. In order to increase Latino mothers initiation rates and reduce Latino childhood obesity, it is important to understand interpersonal, social, and environmental factors that influence mother's breastfeeding initiation and duration, especially in programs that focus on mother and infant nutrition. Access this article here. Share on ...

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University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital Certified Baby-Friendly



University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Hospital was designated a Baby Friendly Hospital in November, 2015 through Baby-Friendly USA's Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. Baby-Friendly Designation is based on evidence-based findings that breastfeeding is beneficial for babies and mothers and recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that successfully implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding to support breastfeeding mothers and provide them the information and resources necessary to breastfeed. UAB Hospital staff and administrators began pursuing a Baby Friendly certification in 2011 by creating consistent messaging to promote breastfeeding, through focus groups with pregnant women and new moms, and by reaching out to specialists, such as obstetricians and ...

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Review of WIC Food Packages: Chap 2: The WIC Participant Experience



Chapter 2: The WIC Participant Experience, in the second in a series of three reports on the Review of WIC Food Packages, summarizes evidence of complex behavioral and environmental factors that influence participation in Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and redemption of WIC foods. Research suggests cultural variation in infant and child feeding practices, which may affect participation in WIC and redemption of WIC benefits. For example, Latinos have lower breastfeeding prevalence than Whites and Asians. Additionally, one study in Maryland found that Latinos preferred beans over peanut butter and they disliked frozen and canned vegetables. Cultural variations, like these, as well as administrative barriers, affect Latino mother's and ...

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