Finally, Some Good News for the Health Insurance of Latino Kids



Latino kids and adults experienced historic increases in healthcare coverage when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded the amount of resources to Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). But CHIP is set to expire on Sept. 30, 2017. Fortunately, good news is on the horizon for CHIP and kids. The U.S. Senate recently announced a bipartisan deal for funding to extend the “life” of the program, The New York Times reports. The new agreement would fund CHIP for an additional five years. Bill Frist, a Forbes contributor and former legislator, urged legislators to finalize the extension. "Healthier children. A more productive workforce. Less financial ruin for working families," Frist said of the benefits of CHIP. The impact of CHIP CHIP was ...

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Celebrating a Culture of Health for Latinos



Two majority-Latino communities are among the eight winners of this year's Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize. Chelsea, MA (62% Latino) and San Pablo, CA (55% Latino) were chosen from 200 applicants along with Algoma, WI, Allen County, KS, Garrett County, MD, Richmond VA, Vicksburg, MS, the Seneca Nation of Indians in Western New York. These communities made strong efforts to ensure their residents have the opportunity to live healthier lives. Winning communities get a $25,000 prize and will have their inspiring stories shared by RWJF. “For the past five years, RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities have inspired hope across the country,” said Dr. Richard Besser, RWJF President and CEO in a news release. “We welcome these eight new prize ...

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Tick Tock: The Impact of DACA on Latinos


latino-kid mental health

President Donald Trump's administration recently rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an American immigration policy signed by President Barack Obama five years ago. DACA allows unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children to work, go to school, and get a driver’s license without fear of deportation. The clock is now ticking for a Congressional fix for people who qualify for DACA. If not, recipients could lose their status starting March 5, 2018. Who are DACA recipients? Since the program started in June 2012, most DACA recipients are in Latino-centric states: California (222,795) followed by Texas (124,000) and Illinois (42,376). Unauthorized immigrants from Mexico make up more than three-quarters of all DACA ...

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A Unique Way to Help Latino Families Avoid Unneeded ER Trips



Too often, a lack of healthcare coverage forces Latinos into the emergency room for non-emergency healthcare. Now, thanks to a new grant, the Center for Healthy Neighborhoods at California State University-Fullerton (CSUF) will create a promotores program to help local Latino families avoid unnecessary ER trips, according to The Orange County Register. Why are ER trips an issue? The community in Fullerton, Calif. (35.24% Latino population), faces numerous obstacles that prevent them from obtaining quality health care, which leads to extremely high rates of preventable ER visits, according to Kaiser Health Foundation-Anaheim. These obstacles include being “linguistically isolated,” lacking awareness, and affordability. How the new program will reduce ER trips The $40,000 ...

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How Hispanic Heritage Month Became a Thing


latino kid mariachis

At Salud America!, we're excited to discuss Latino health during Hispanic Heritage Month! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. How did this observance start? U.S. Rep. Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles introduced legislation on the topic. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover its current 30-day period. President Ronald Reagan implemented the expansion. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988. Why is the date of this observance important? Sept. 15 is significant ...

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Nearly 30 Million Americans are Still Uninsured



There is good news and bad news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) when it comes to new data on the U.S. and health insurance. First, the good news. The country saw a decline in the number of uninsured adults of nearly 500,000 from January through March of 2017, compared to the same time frame in 2016. Now, the bad news. Nearly 9% of the population are still without insurance, especially Latinos. This translates to almost 28 million people, according to a report from the CDC. “[The drop of nearly 500,000] from the same period last year … isn’t considered a significant change,” the CDC said in the report. Insurance & Latinos Latinos have made great strides in recent years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with the ...

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Study: Latinos Are Closing the Big Gap in Access to Healthcare


latino doctor with patient

Latinos have far less health insurance coverage than their white and black peers. But disparities in access to healthcare have narrowed for Latinos, compared to whites, thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and healthcare.gov in English and Spanish, according to a new report. The Commonwealth Fund report shows: The uninsured rate for Latinos adults dropped by 12 percentage points from 2013 to 2015. That's a larger decline than among blacks (9 percentage points) and whites (5 percentage points). The share of Latino adults who skipped doctor’s visits because of costs decreased by 5 percentage points, from 27% percent to 22%. That's a larger decline than among whites (2 percentage points). The share of black and of Hispanic adults age 18 and older without a usual ...

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Back-to-School = Time for Kids to Get Covered


kids at school bus stop

Schools are welcoming back students for another year of education. It’s also the time of year for parents to think about getting children covered with health insurance. Latinos are currently the largest ethnic and racial minority in the United States. They are also the largest uninsured population in the country. As their population continues to grow, it is going to be crucial for all Latinos to have access to quality healthcare. This starts with Latino children. The Connecting Kids to Coverage campaign was created for purposes such as these. With the goal of helping parents and families find the resources they are eligible for, such as Medicaid and CHIP, the campaign has launched a series of online, bilingual resources. “The Campaign lets families know who is ...

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How to Help Latinos Enroll, Graduate from College


Learning latin female student with curly hair

Did you know: In King County, Washington (9.28% Latino population), only 1 in 4 of all Latino high-school graduates go on to earn a college degree? This is in stark contrast to the region’s 1 in 2 Asian and white students who earn a degree. In an effort to help Latinos both enroll in and succeed in college once they get there, Highline College has created the innovative Puente program. As part of this initiative, just 25 students – most are first-generation Latino students who are the first members of their families to attend college – are “banded” together for the course of their studies. Culturally focused learning community Education determines a lot about a person’s life. Education factors into their health, where they live, their access to resources, and their ...

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The State of Latino Obesity in the U.S.



Obesity rates are showing signs of leveling off, but rates among Latino adults and children remain much higher than whites, according to a new report. In nine heavily Latino-populated states, the adult obesity rates were at or above 35%, according to the 14th annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America report by Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Latino adults are more obese (42.6%) than their white peers (36.3%). Similarly, among children, Latinos have are more obese (21.9%) than their black (19.5%) and white (14.7%) peers, according to the new report. This means much work is left to promote a healthy weight. Adult Obesity by the Numbers This year, the adult obesity rates were over 35% in five states: ...

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