Tick Tock: The Impact of DACA on Latinos


latino-kid mental health

President Donald Trump's administration recently rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an American immigration policy signed by President Barack Obama five years ago. DACA allows unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children to work, go to school, and get a driver’s license without fear of deportation. The clock is now ticking for a Congressional fix for people who qualify for DACA. If not, recipients could lose their status starting March 5, 2018. Who are DACA recipients? Since the program started in June 2012, most DACA recipients are in Latino-centric states: California (222,795) followed by Texas (124,000) and Illinois (42,376). Unauthorized immigrants from Mexico make up more than three-quarters of all DACA ...

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Newborn Screening Resources in Spanish



Almost 23% of the 3.99 million babies born in 2015 were Hispanic. Early diagnosis of certain conditions can make the difference between healthy development and lifelong physical or mental disability for these babies. Newborn Screening In 1963, Newborn Screening begins with a heel stick. Screenings identify babies who may have a variety of genetic, metabolic, hormonal and functional conditions so that precise follow-up testing can be performed. Since 1963, babies with serious but treatable conditions caught by Newborn Screening grow up healthy with expected development. All it takes is a few drops of blood and a simple hearing test. However, Newborn Screening is an evolving system that varies across the country, thus many parents don’t know of the conditions included in ...

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Suicide Prevention Week: Take Action, Speak Up for Latinos


latino boy stress sad teen

Latinos are a big focus of National Suicide Prevention Week on Sept. 10-16, 2017. Young Latinos are more likely than their peers to attempt suicide. High levels of stress, from discrimination, poverty and bullying, play a big role in this high percentage rate, according to our new Mental Health & Latino Kids Research. What can you do to help raise awareness and prevent suicide in your community? Start by knowing the signs. Here is a few examples of warning signs, according to the Mental Health America of Texas. Feeling hopeless. According to our research, 32.6% of Latino students reported feelings of hopelessness and sadness that continued for more than two weeks and resulted in decreased participation in activities they had previously enjoyed, a study found. ...

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How Hispanic Heritage Month Became a Thing


latino kid mariachis

At Salud America!, we're excited to discuss Latino health during Hispanic Heritage Month! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. How did this observance start? U.S. Rep. Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles introduced legislation on the topic. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover its current 30-day period. President Ronald Reagan implemented the expansion. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988. Why is the date of this observance important? Sept. 15 is significant ...

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Webinar: Walking Toward Justice



Housing segregation caused many social justice issues throughout the 1900s. One big one is neighborhood walkability. You are invited to join America Walks’ quarterly webinar series, Walking Toward Justice, to examine past and present walkability issues in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color, and search for solutions. Charles T. Brown of America Walks, who helped create the series, will moderate each webinar. The first webinar on 9/27/17 Register here for the first webinar of the series, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Government Segregated America, at 2 p.m. EST Sept, 27, 2017. The webinar will feature author Richard Rothstein. Rothstein’s book debunks myths about racial discrimination. It also provides evidence of how governments prevented ...

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Nearly 30 Million Americans are Still Uninsured



There is good news and bad news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) when it comes to new data on the U.S. and health insurance. First, the good news. The country saw a decline in the number of uninsured adults of nearly 500,000 from January through March of 2017, compared to the same time frame in 2016. Now, the bad news. Nearly 9% of the population are still without insurance, especially Latinos. This translates to almost 28 million people, according to a report from the CDC. “[The drop of nearly 500,000] from the same period last year … isn’t considered a significant change,” the CDC said in the report. Insurance & Latinos Latinos have made great strides in recent years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with the ...

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Study: Latinos Are Closing the Big Gap in Access to Healthcare


latino doctor with patient

Latinos have far less health insurance coverage than their white and black peers. But disparities in access to healthcare have narrowed for Latinos, compared to whites, thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and healthcare.gov in English and Spanish, according to a new report. The Commonwealth Fund report shows: The uninsured rate for Latinos adults dropped by 12 percentage points from 2013 to 2015. That's a larger decline than among blacks (9 percentage points) and whites (5 percentage points). The share of Latino adults who skipped doctor’s visits because of costs decreased by 5 percentage points, from 27% percent to 22%. That's a larger decline than among whites (2 percentage points). The share of black and of Hispanic adults age 18 and older without a usual ...

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Back-to-School = Time for Kids to Get Covered


kids at school bus stop

Schools are welcoming back students for another year of education. It’s also the time of year for parents to think about getting children covered with health insurance. Latinos are currently the largest ethnic and racial minority in the United States. They are also the largest uninsured population in the country. As their population continues to grow, it is going to be crucial for all Latinos to have access to quality healthcare. This starts with Latino children. The Connecting Kids to Coverage campaign was created for purposes such as these. With the goal of helping parents and families find the resources they are eligible for, such as Medicaid and CHIP, the campaign has launched a series of online, bilingual resources. “The Campaign lets families know who is ...

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The State of Latino Obesity in the U.S.



Obesity rates are showing signs of leveling off, but rates among Latino adults and children remain much higher than whites, according to a new report. In nine heavily Latino-populated states, the adult obesity rates were at or above 35%, according to the 14th annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America report by Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Latino adults are more obese (42.6%) than their white peers (36.3%). Similarly, among children, Latinos have are more obese (21.9%) than their black (19.5%) and white (14.7%) peers, according to the new report. This means much work is left to promote a healthy weight. Adult Obesity by the Numbers This year, the adult obesity rates were over 35% in five states: ...

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An Analysis of Child Care Deserts by Zip Code in 8 States


Latino health early childhood development

Although research has shown the many health, social and emotional, and cognitive benefits of quality early child care and education, Latinos have the lowest participation in these programs. Why? Child care deserts may be the answer. Although affordability, work schedules, and waiting lists are also factors, location is often the first major consideration for families. Center for American Progress looked into the location of child care centers across eight states, which accounts for 20% of the population under age five. The authors define child care desert as a ZIP code with at least 30 children under the age of five and either no child care centers so few centers that there are more than three times as many children under age 5 as there are spaces in centers. See ...

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