An Analysis of Child Care Deserts by Zip Code in 8 States


Latino health early childhood development

Although research has shown the many health, social and emotional, and cognitive benefits of quality early child care and education, Latinos have the lowest participation in these programs. Why? Child care deserts may be the answer. Although affordability, work schedules, and waiting lists are also factors, location is often the first major consideration for families. Center for American Progress looked into the location of child care centers across eight states, which accounts for 20% of the population under age five. The authors define child care desert as a ZIP code with at least 30 children under the age of five and either no child care centers so few centers that there are more than three times as many children under age 5 as there are spaces in centers. See ...

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Report: Latinos Hit Hardest by Housing Market Collapse



When the housing market collapsed in 2006, it led to one of the hardest-hitting, wide-reaching financial crises that the United States had felt in decades. The Great Recession, as it became known, had a disproportionate impact on minorities – especially Latinos – that still impacts their ability to achieve the goal of home ownership. It also keeps many Latinos from fully participating in the economy. A study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis found that the housing prices during the recession fell more in urban, low-income areas and that minorities had far larger shares of their personal wealth “tied up” in their homes than whites. “The housing market collapse affected millions of American families across the country, but it hit black and Latino families ...

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Is Fast Food Keeping its Promise for Healthier Kids Menus?



Latino kids tend to live in neighborhoods with more access to fast food restaurants and less access to healthier food options, according to Salud America! research. Regularly eating high-calorie, high-sugar, and high-sodium meals at these restaurants can have devastating long-term health impacts, such as obesity, heart disease, and more. In an effort to combat these worsening trends, some of the largest fast-food restaurant chains pledged to offer healthier meal options on their kids’ menus. Some pledged to remove sugary drinks, and other pledged to add healthier options. Were they able to keep their promises? Fast food study The Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity, a nonprofit research and public policy organization based out of the University of Connecticut, ...

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Do Latinos Live in the Safest Cities in America?



It’s a fact. Where you live greatly affects your health. Live near a major road? A power plant? Or a densely populated neighborhood? Are you close to a supermarket? All of these factors – and more – impact your health on a day-to-day basis. For many low-income and Latino families, live in areas that have been classified as food deserts, with little to no access to healthy food options, safe places for physical activity, or access to quality health care. Many of these highly segregated areas are high in crime and poverty. The data analyzation web site, Niche, has compiled a ranking of the “Safest Places to Live” for 2017. How does this list impact Latinos? Most and Least Safe Cities in the U.S. By studying FBI reports on numerous crime factors in cities (9,932 of them) ...

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The Growth of the Latino Population is Slowing Down


population of united states

While still on the rise, the annual growth rate of the U.S. Latino population has dropped from 3.7% in 2006 to 2% in 2017, according to new stats from Pew Research Center. U.S. Asians now account for the highest growth rate (3% in 2017). The black population rose slightly (0.9), while whites slightly decreased. Why the leveling off of Latino population growth? "Following a Hispanic population boom in the 1990s that was driven by immigration and high fertility rates, the Hispanic population’s annual growth rate peaked at 4.2% in 2001," according to Pew's Jens Manuel Krogstad. "It then started to decline as fertility rates fell and immigration slowed, a trend that accelerated during the Great Recession." But that doesn't mean the Latino population is in decline. Rather, ...

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Report: Heavily Latino Cities Named Least Educated in U.S.



Latinos have historically lagged behind whites in education. They have made strides, like a declining dropout rate and increased college enrollment, but are still more disconnected (not in school, not working) and lag in college completion. Education is key to health, income, and the economy. That's why the financial website WalletHub analyzed 150 U.S. metro regions with nine factors—like public school quality and college graduate rates—to find the "most educated" and "least educated" areas. Unfortunately, the five least-educated areas were all heavily Latino. The McAllen-Edinburg-Mission metro area in South Texas (85.77% Latino) was the least educated city in the country. The area came in 150th on the Educational Attainment and 104th on the Quality of Education & ...

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Latinos are Well-Represented in Both the Most & Least Educated Cities in the U.S.



Having an education, quite frankly, is very important. A person’s education level determines much about how their life will unfold. Education is associated with overall health, income level, career paths, access to resources, and housing. More and more Latinos are finding their way into two- and four-year colleges and universities, making great strides in education. As more and more schools develop programming to help Latino students succeed, the number of Latino college graduates is expected to steadily rise. The Economic Policy Institute proposed a theory stating that college degree holders earn more money and thus contribute more to a city’s tax base over time. With this in mind, the financial website WalletHub recently analyzed the 150 largest metropolitan areas in the ...

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World Breastfeeding Week 2017: Sustaining Breastfeeding Together


Latino health breastfeeding equity sustainability

Sustainable development is essentially about ecology, economy, and equity. We cannot achieve sustainable development without multi-level partnerships at all levels. World Breastfeeding Week 2017 is about sustaining breastfeeding together across four thematic areas: Nutrition, Food Security and Poverty Reduction Survival, Health and Wellbeing Environment and Climate Change Women's Productivity and Employment Breastfeeding is one conversation in getting us to think about how to value our health and wellbeing from the start of life, how to respect each other, and how to care for the world we share. Learn more about how breastfeeding is a component of sustainable development. Together, we can attract political support, media attention, and participation of young ...

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Language Barriers Often Keep Latinos from Being Home Owners



Where people live determines a great deal; it impacts education, income, access to resources, and overall health. Home ownership is often a great source of pride for many individuals, including Latinos. However, many Latinos often run into significant barriers that keep them from becoming homeowners. One of the main barriers is language. Often times, Latinos are unable to find Spanish-language or even bilingual information that could help them in the home buying process. In Sioux Falls, South Dakota (3.31% Latino population), Spanish-language home-buyer education classes have been started by the Sioux Empire Housing Partnership to encourage the growing Latino population to become home owners, the Sioux City Journal reports. i The group now offers Spanish-language versions of ...

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Texas Education Agency Creates Bilingual Materials for Latino Parents



Latinos have made great strides in education over the past decade. More and more Latinos are graduating from high school; dropout rates are at all-time lows, and even more are attending colleges and universities for the first time ever. Historically, one of the major obstacles in the way of Latinos attaining academic success have been language barriers. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has designed a new STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) report card that will share end-of-year test results that are bilingual and constructed in an “easy-to-understand format.” These report cards are mailed to parents and they can use their child’s unique code to log in and learn more at the Texas Assessment Management System website. There are practical resources for ...

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