Heavily Latino-Populated States are the Best for Jobs



According to the recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the economy added 138,000 jobs in May with the overall unemployment rate falling to 4.3%. This is the lowest the rate has been in 16 years. While the job rate was not as high as had been predicted, these are indicators that the economy overall has sufficiently rebounded from the Great Recession of the mid-2000s. What does this mean for Latinos? For many Latinos, financial security that comes from employment is crucial to their long-term health. With better paying jobs comes better access to healthcare, better access to physical activity, better access to education for family members, and better access to opportunity. The financial website WalletHub recently ranked the best and worst states for job seekers based ...

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Nearly Half of all Americans Struggle Financially in Retirement



Stress is a major problem for many Americans, including Latinos. Everyday stresses—such as paying bills and juggling childcare—can have short- and long-term health effects, such as a stomach ache, higher blood pressure, etc., the American Psychological Association (APA) reports. One of the greatest stressors plaguing Latino families has to do with finances. The situation might be even worse long-term. In a recent GoBankingRates study, 69% of adults admitted to having less than $1,000 in the bank, while 34% said they actually don't have any savings at all. But apparently, this collective lack of savings doesn't get all that much better with age. According to USA Today, the problem is that dying nearly broke isn't just a matter of denying one's beneficiaries an inheritance; ...

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The One Sure-Fire Way to Recruit Latinos for Beneficial Studies


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Editor's Note: American Heart Association News originally published this article. For years, many U.S. Hispanics have been excluded from treatment studies because they don’t speak English. So a handful of Southern California researchers got creative when recruiting patients for a recent project. Would having Spanish-speaking staff and Spanish-language materials result in significantly more Hispanic participants than they’d seen in previous studies? It did. And it was unexpectedly easy to sign up Spanish speakers once researchers started speaking their language, said Nerses Sanossian, M.D., the study’s lead author and associate professor of neurology at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. The study, published recently in the journal ...

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Medical Nonadherence: A Growing Health Problem for Latinos



Many Latinos face numerous barriers that keep them from attaining the best healthcare possible. These range from a lack of access and a lack of coverage to a language barriers and cultural stigmas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recently uncovered another barrier: medical nonadherence. According to the CDC, not following instructions for prescribed medications accounts for 125,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Medication nonadherence also accounts for 11% of all hospitalizations and between $100 and $300 billion in spending. Medical nonadherence has become a major public health concern, especially for minority and low-income families. In order to reduce health disparities, it is critical to address inequities in programs, practices, and ...

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Caffeine Use Among Kids on the Rise, Latinos May Be Targeted



Caffeine use among children is increasing.   Sodas as well as energy drinks are a major source of caffeine for kids. A recent study shows 29% of 7th and 8th graders can’t judge what has caffeine and what doesn’t. Between 30% and 50% of teens and young adults reported using energy drinks. Energy drinks account for up to 58% of a person’s beverage budget for those on government assistance. For Latinos, there are 22% more ads for energy drinks on Spanish radio as compared to English radio. This targeting to Latinos could increase future energy drink use in the Latino community. Why is this a problem? The American Academy of Pediatrics says caffeine might have health risks for kids. Sodas, energy drinks, or other caffeinated drinks often have large amounts of ...

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June Is Men’s Health Month—Get Involved!


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SaludToday Guest Blogger Ana Fadich, Vice President, Men's Health Network Did you know there was a month entirely dedicated to raising awareness for issues impacting the health and wellness of men and boys? June will honor the 23rd annual Men’s Health Month. The month also coincides with Men’s Health Week (June 12-18, 2017), a special awareness period created by Congress, and the #ShowUsYourBlue campaign on June 16 where men and women are encouraged to wear blue to work that day to show their support for the health and wellbeing of Latino and all boys and men. See our easy list of things to do to be active, aware, all month long. June is Men’s Health Month – spread the word and make sure every loved male in your life is living well. Early screenings! They ...

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A Team Approach for Improving Access to Mental Health Care for Latino Children



One in five children ages 3 to 17 have a mental health condition. While most kids do not receive care for mental health conditions,  it is even less likely for a Latino child to see a mental health provider. Latino children made 58% fewer visits to any mental health provider compared to white children. Latino kids were also less likely than white or black children to see a doctor. In 2013-2014, only 11.6% of Latino kids under age 18 went to a doctor’s office or clinic compared to 7.4% of white and 8.6% of black kids. A lack of mental health care can impact a child in many aspects of life. Kids with untreated mental health conditions are at a higher risk of suspension from school, dropping out, and even have a higher risk of being put in jail. One way to bridge the gap is to ...

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Large Numbers of Older Latinos Have Tapped into Retirement Accounts



A recent poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that older Latinos are more likely than whites or African Americans to borrow money from a retirement account. Whether do to a pressing financial concern or a medical emergency, 34% of all Latinos surveyed (compared to 24% of whites and 25% of African Americans) have at least partially “tapped into” a retirement account. Nearly 1/3 of all the respondents reported withdrawing money to pay monthly bills such as rent and utilities. Many Latinos, especially those born outside of the United States, have little to no savings. In these cases, an emergency of any kind can be devastating financially. “Latinos are using retirement accounts for emergencies,” said Ernest Gonzales, sociology ...

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VIDEO: A Tale of Two Zip Codes



"When it comes to predicting how long you will live, your zip code is more important than your genetic code," George Takei narrates in A Tale of Two Zip Codes, an animated short film by the California Endowment's 10-year Building Healthy Communities initiative. Where you live determines your opportunities, thus your health and life expectancy. Consider not having healthy food options, clean air, safe sidewalks, nearby parks, quality schools, public transportation and preventive health care-the root causes lie in racial and economic discrimination. Struggling so much to find healthy options can be an overwhelming source of chronic stress, which is a serious health risk factor. If we are all going to be healthier, we need to look at inequality. Countries with the ...

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500 Cities Project: Local Data for Better Health


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How can you use data to improve health in your area? The 500 Cities dataset tries to provide an answer. The data set, which contains estimates of adult chronic disease, unhealthy behaviors, and preventive care for census tracts in 500 of the largest American cities, launched in 2016 thanks to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the CDC Foundation. The Urban Institute released a research report in May 2017 on how to use the data to reach change-making partners. Access the data set here and register for a webinar on Tuesday, June 13, from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. (EST) with Urban Institute to learn how to host a local event centered on the new 500 Cities neighborhood-level health data. Census tract-level data allows cities ...

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