Two PE Teachers Bring 60 Minutes of Daily Physical Activity to Students Before or After School



Many Latino students don’t meet daily recommendations of physical activity because they lack access to quality activity opportunities during school and they are burdened by barriers to access quality activity opportunities after school, such as safety, availability and cost. Kids that don’t meet daily recommendations of physical activity are at increased risk for obesity and other adverse health outcomes. Two PE teachers in Edmonds School District in Washington developed a before/after school program as well as a recess program to help kids reach 60 minutes of recommended daily activity on most days of the week. They developed these programs to be implemented in schools to reduce accessibility barriers associated with safety, availability and cost. EMERGENCE: Awareness: Jennifer ...

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Kids Get Healthy Eating Lessons at Farmers Markets in Oregon



When parents bring kids to farmers markets, it’s a great opportunity to learn about new food and healthy options, but that educational opportunity often goes unrealized. A group of managers of farmers markets in Oregon teamed up to create a club to teach Latino kids and other kids who come to the market about farming, fresh produce and healthy eating. Now kids ages 5-12 who visit local Farmers Markets, like Forest Grove Farmers Market in Ore., (23.1% Latino) are engaged in the Market Sprouts Kid Club, where they participate in fun, interactive activities alongside farmers and volunteers that teach about healthier foods and healthier choices. EMERGENCE Awareness: Officials with Adelante Mujeres, a non-profit organization in Forest Grove, Ore., which focuses on Latinos, have been ...

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“Fields for All” Brings Soccer Fields and Futsal Courts to Recreation Deserts in Multnomah County



Many Latino kids live in “recreation deserts,” which lack access to safe, affordable physical activity opportunities. Therefore, they often do not meet daily physical activity recommendations and are at increased risk for obesity. One way to reduce these barriers and increase physical activity among Latino children is to provide free, safe recreation facilities in their neighborhood with culturally relevant programming. Two community-driven initiatives in Multnomah County, Ore., have crossed paths in their efforts to reduce recreation deserts in disadvantaged neighborhoods by building and fixing soccer fields and futsal courts. EMERGENCE Awareness:  Oregon residents Shawn Levy and Ricki Ruiz love soccer and know it is good for kids and adults. But each found that soccer, and ...

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Health Navigator + School = Latino Parents Connected to Health Services



Latinos face many barriers to health care, including language differences; complex and confusing documents and processes; lack of knowledge of available services; unreliable transportation; and fear of using government services. One way to increase health equity among Latinos is to remove these barriers. Rocio Muñoz, community health navigator at Benton County Health Department (BCHD), in partnership with the school district, worked to embed bilingual, bicultural health navigators into elementary schools in Corvallis, Ore. (7.4% Latino), to address these identified barriers. The partnership resulted in a model where health navigators are placed in schools to coordinate with students, parents and teachers regarding students’ health records in order to boost access to health ...

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Creating a Curriculum for Healthy Nutrition



What so great about beans? Grad student Kelly Atterberry has the answer in her new bean-based garden and nutrition curriculum for K-12 students in Washington. By encouraging kids to learn to garden and try nutritious pulse crops (beans, lentils, peas, etc.), she hopes her curriculum can help combat obesity and diet-related health problems among children. EMERGENCE Awareness: Kelly Atterberry originally wanted to go nursing school. Then she learned about agriculture and growing healthy food while working on a farm and again later while working in the Agriculture Research Station at Washington State University (WSU) in Mount Vernon, Wash. (33.7 % Latino). So she switched her career course. As a grad student at WSU, she studied agriculture, which united her interest of health, ...

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Innovative Health Education for Kids, by Kids in Schools



In a Florida school district that didn’t provide health classes in high schools, a health educator, Risa Berrin, and her sister, Valerie Berrin, worked together to raise the bar on health education with their Health Information Project (HIP). HIP is a peer-to-peer program that allows students to teach each other about health problems, prevention, and how to access to local health resources toward reducing obesity, suicide, depression and other issues. EMERGENCE Awareness: Risa Berrin was a health reporter for her college newspaper when she first started seeing how teens were unaware or misinformed about health and prevention. She became part of the solution, starting a career as a certified human growth and reproductive health educator. While teaching law classes at a Miami-area ...

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Dr. “Dunk the Junk” Uses Counter Marketing to Teach Kids Better Nutrition



Healthy eating is not usually promoted in rap songs or graffiti art, but what if it would help improve kids’ diets? To compete with the unhealthy marketing that kids—especially Latinos—are bombarded with daily, Dr. Kevin Strong founded the “Dunk the Junk” movement to work in schools and through social media to tailor health messages to kids in a fun way to counter junk food advertising. He uses rap, hip-hop dance, basketball, and graffiti art to change what kids think is cool to eat. EMERGENCE Awareness: In his many years as a community pediatrician in Maine, Dr. Kevin Strong saw countless kids with poor nutrition habits. While interning for University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Strong saw that Latino immigrant families who start eating the “American ...

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San Antonio Unpacks the Truth Of Sugary Beverages



To inform and educate the San Antonio community on just how much sugar is in the beverages people consume daily, health officials and community leaders partnered to launch the bilingual Sugar-Packed marketing campaign. After San Antonio’s previous attempts to tackle sugary drink consumption fizzled out, Nelson Wolff, judge of Bexar County, which includes San Antonio, and his partners reignited a campaign against sugar with hopes to change the way residents look at sugar in beverages and its effect on health. The campaign includes print and online materials, including a sugar calculator tool, educational brochures, and posters. EMERGENCE Awareness: In 1997, Bexar County’s Health Collaborative formed as a coalition of health agencies that aim to improve the health status of the ...

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Latino Student Leaders Work to get Healthier Lunch Options at School



When Latino kids choose to eat more fresh fruits and vegetables and less soda and chips, they set a good example for friends and family. But what if they can’t maintain their healthy lifestyle at school? Read what happens when youth leaders work with their school board to get healthy, vegan and vegetarian-approved lunch items into their cafeteria, not only to satisfy their desire to eat healthy but to empower other students to make healthier choices. EMERGENCE Awareness/Learn: For Sandra Garcia, it took planting a garden to realize just how powerful healthy food can be, not only for a community, but for a culture. “When SWU [Southwest Workers’ Union] started the Roots of Change Garden in 2007, I realized how beautiful it was to grow your own naturally organic food,” said ...

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Latino Youth Help Communities to Step Up vs. Big Soda



Latino and African American youth as well as individuals belonging to a local coalition of health leaders joined forces to launch Open Truth, a counter-advertising campaign that exposes big soda companies’ marketing tactics aimed at youth and communities of color. The result was a series of poems and videos created by youth, as well as dozens of ads viewed by millions, a website, and a viral social media campaign aimed at getting those targeted by soda companies to speak out against Big Soda. EMERGENCE Awareness:  By 2008, Christina Goette of the San Francisco Public Health Department and Shape Up San Francisco (Shape Up SF), a coalition of community groups and leaders interested in preventing chronic disease and promoting better health for the region, were already very ...

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