Melanoma Diagnosed Later in Latinos, Blacks



Melanoma skin cancer is becoming more common among Hispanics and whites, and it is more likely to be diagnosed at a more advanced stage among blacks and Hispanics, new research shows. Melanoma is the least common but most deadly type of skin cancer. University of Miami researchers focused on 41,072 Florida residents diagnosed with the disease between 1990 and 2004. As expected, most cases — more than 39,000 — were seen in non-Hispanic whites. An additional 1,148 occurred in Hispanic whites, while 254 cases occurred among black men and women. Non-Hispanic whites accounted for most of the melanoma cases, but the timing of their diagnoses steadily improved. In contrast, timing of diagnoses did not improve in blacks and Hispanic whites, according to a news report about the study, which ...

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Cancer Survival Disparities Increase among Latinos, Minorities As Cancers Become More Treatable



Racial and ethnic disparities in cancer survival are greatest for cancers that can be detected early and treated successfully, including breast and prostate cancer, according to a new study, Medical News Today reports. Disparities are small for pancreatic, lung and other cancers with more limited early detection and treatment options. The study, published in the October 2009 issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention, found that, compared with whites, substantial survival disparities existed in more treatable cancers in Latinos, African-Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and several Asian/Pacific Islander population subgroups. The finding highlight the need to develop specific health policies and interventions to address social ...

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NIH Launches Program to Combat Obesity Among Latinos, Others



The National Institutes of Health is launching a $37 million research program on human behavior to develop more effective interventions to reduce obesity. The program, Translating Basic Behavioral and Social Science Discoveries into Interventions to Reduce Obesity, will fund interdisciplinary teams of researchers at seven sites. Investigators will conduct experimental and formative research to increase understanding of populations being studied, small studies known as proof of concept trials, and pilot and feasibility studies to identify promising new avenues for encouraging behaviors that prevent or treat obesity. The program’s studies focus on diverse populations at high risk of being overweight or obese, including Latino and African American adults, youths, low-income populations, ...

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Increasing the Diversity of the Cancer Research Workforce



Latinos and African Americans make up nearly 25 percent of the U.S. population. Yet, in 2005, they comprised only 3.2 percent of funded principal investigators on National Institutes of Health (NIH) research project grants and 5.5 percent of research trainees supported by NIH training grants. A concerted move is under way to change that, particularly at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), where several programs are focused on increasing the diversity of the cancer research workforce. Read more about this effort ...

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NEW! Latino Cancer PSA: Breast Cancer



Please watch our new Latino cancer PSA: "Fast Life." This true-to-life PSA shows that, despite busy lives, Latinas ages 40 and older should set aside time to take care of their own health and get their mammogram each year that can detect breast cancer early, when it is most treatable. Watch in English: Or watch in Spanish: How did this PSA affect you? Did it move you? Why or why not? Let us know in the comments ...

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San Antonio School Starts Wellness Campaign



After watching some middle-schoolers use soda machines to buy “lunch,” Principal Dr. John Kennedy decided that changes were needed at St. Anthony Catholic School in the predominantly Latino city of San Antonio, Texas. He was approached by some parents who also were interested in addressing student health, and the Mi Vida (My Life) wellness campaign was born. Mi Vida is an acronym for a short poem they wrote: My life includes Veggies, fruits & fun in meals with everyone, daily walks or climbing trees, and learning at St. Anthony’s! The motto of Mi Vida is “Play Often. Eat Well.” “The paths toward healthy minds, bodies, and spirit are interconnected, and achieving this overall health is part of our community goals at St. Anthony’s,” said Dr. Kennedy. ...

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Lessons Learned on Increasing Physical Activity in Special Populations (Including Latinos)



The Active Living by Design program, community action model and lessons learned from 15 grantee communities are featured in a supplement of the December 2009 edition of the The American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The practice-based special issue describes community partnerships representing a range of lead agencies with emphasis on increasing physical activity in special populations, including Latinos. There are examples of the process of planning and implementing comprehensive approaches to increase community levels of physical activity, including how to engage partners, secure resources, increase community participation, design policy and environment interventions, increase political or community support, address challenges or minimize barriers, and keep the momentum going ...

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Latinos, Here’s Help to Quit Smoking



Need inspiration or help finding the way to quit smoking? There is good news: The Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR), the team behind SaludToday, has developed ¡Buena Vida! A Guide to Help You Quit Smoking. The booklet offers Latinos info, tools and tips for quitting smoking, and tells the stories of five Latinos who have quit, like Estefanía Villareal (pictured at right). Read the booklet in English. Read the booklet in Spanish. Find out more about the IHPR's materials to help Latinos quit ...

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SaludToday Profile: Dan Hughes



Periodically we'll feature a faculty member from the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday. Today it's Dan Hughes. Daniel Hughes, who came to the U.S. from Mexico City as a child, went on to get his chemical engineering degree and spent two decades working his way from engineering to middle management at Dow Chemical. But, in his mid-40s, his life changed. A close friend and long-time colleague suffered lung cancer with complications for years before succumbing to the disease. Several close family members also died of cancer, including close cousins and the aunt who brought him to the U.S. He reflected on his life’s work—a “serious midlife crisis,” friends and family called it. He called it a ...

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