Researchers Get $82 Million to Push for Minority Health Solutions


group of latino people

A dozen new research centers will tackle Latino and minority health problems thanks to $82 million for the next five years from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Latinos suffer worse rates of obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers and diseases. Why? They face cultural and language barriers, lack of access to resources, and a drastic lack of health care coverage. With this new round of funding, the NIMHD will create 12 "Centers of Excellence" to investigate preventable diseases like heart disease and diabetes, along with exposure to substance abuse, violence, and trauma, which disproportionately affect minorities. “We need strong collaborations and research based upon asking the right questions in specific areas,” said Dr. Eliseo J. ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/24: Improving Health Literacy and Advocacy For Latinos



About half of Latino adults lack basic health literacy. Health literacy is how well a person understands health info, and uses it to make health decisions. The lower your health literacy, the worse your health. Fortunately, advocates have many ways to improve health literacy in schools and communities! Let's use #SaludTues on Oct. 24, 2017, to share how to push for health literacy among local families, and celebrate #healthliteracymonth! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Healthy Literacy and Advocacy TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Society of Health and Physical Educators (@SHAPE_America); March of Dimes nacer sano  (@nacersano); University of Texas Center for Health Communication ...

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Celebrating a Culture of Health for Latinos



Two majority-Latino communities are among the eight winners of this year's Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize. Chelsea, MA (62% Latino) and San Pablo, CA (55% Latino) were chosen from 200 applicants along with Algoma, WI, Allen County, KS, Garrett County, MD, Richmond VA, Vicksburg, MS, the Seneca Nation of Indians in Western New York. These communities made strong efforts to ensure their residents have the opportunity to live healthier lives. Winning communities get a $25,000 prize and will have their inspiring stories shared by RWJF. “For the past five years, RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities have inspired hope across the country,” said Dr. Richard Besser, RWJF President and CEO in a news release. “We welcome these eight new prize ...

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Why Everybody’s Free to Wear Sunscreen in New York


Getting ready for the beach

As temperatures blaze this summer, don't forget the water and the sunscreen! Latinos, who face a shockingly high risk of skin cancer, should wear head covering, sunglasses, and sunscreen to protect against the sun. What if you can't afford find or afford sunscreen, though? A cool new initiative in New York City (28.9% Latino population) offers free sunscreen dispensers in all five city boroughs, CityLab reports. “The mix of raising awareness about the problem of melanoma and providing a free preventive measure [sunscreen] is an easy step towards reducing skin cancer,” said Bright Guard CEO and Co-Founder Ryan Warren told CityLab. The Myth of Latinos and No Skin Cancer It is true that skin damage from the sun, which can lead to skin cancer, affects those with lighter ...

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Community Center in Pittsburgh Creates Outreach for Latina Health



There are many barriers that exist that keep some Latinos from achieving the best health possible. Cultural stigmas, language barriers, and a lack of access are just some of these barriers. For Latinas, the problems can be even more frightening. Lack of insurance, lack of transportation, and even isolation are common problems that keep many Latinas from receiving medical treatment. At the Latino Community Center in Pittsburgh, PA (2.72% Latino population), has recognized this growing problem and has decided to do something about it, as reported by The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Using an idea based on the promotores de salud concept, the center has recruited and trained women to become “liaisons” in heavily Latino-populated neighborhoods in the city. These liaisons will ...

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Detroit Partnership Combines Literacy & Swimming for Kids


Latino Health Swimming Pools

Since 2010, Detroit Swims has taught more than 5800 kids how to swim and aims to teach all kids in the Metro Detroit. Swimming is excellent for mental and physical health, as well as academic achievement, but of f the 120,000 children in the city, it’s estimated 100,000 of them can’t swim, according to one source. Detroit Swims is a nonprofit started by lifeguards in 2010 at the Boll Family YMCA to reduce disparities in swim ability.  The lifeguards contributed $2000 out of their paycheck to teach the first 35 kids how to swim. Latino kids across the country often lack access to pools and swimming lessons, thus face higher rates of drowning and obesity related chronic disease compared to white kids. Detroit Swims has expanded to over six locations, and works with local ...

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Latino Parenting Master Classes Help Young Kids Succeed



Latinos are the nation’s largest racial/ethnic minority group. They are expected to grow from 1 in 6 people today to 1 in 4 by 2035 and 1 in 3 by 2060. The long-term health and success of Latinos is going to be crucially important to the United States for decades to come. In the Pacific Northwest community of Walla Wall, WA (23.68% Latino population), one group has taken steps to ensure their Latino community has all the tools necessary for their success. The Walla Walla Valley Early Learning Coalition is offering a free, 10-week series of parenting master classes aimed at Latinos. Using “cultural perspective” and taught in Spanish, the Abriendo Puertas (Opening Doors) program is designed to support Latino parents in their roles as family leaders and teachers to their ...

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At-Risk Residents Get a Cooking Class You Can Take Home for Dinner



Noemi Villarreal sees Latinos in San Antonio struggle with disease, and wants to help. That’s why she has helped launch family support connectors, and also developed farmers markets in the Eastside, a heavily Latino section of the city. The farmers markets did not work. How could Villarreal and neighborhood leaders still bring cooking and nutrition education to families to help prevent disease? Thinking outside the box, they created a series of classes that include a chef demonstration—and take-home bags so families can replicate nutritious food recipes at home. Encouraging Healthy Eating for Latinos San Antonio’s Eastside Promise Neighborhood (EPN) is home to 18,000 residents (67.5% Latino) who face health issues due to inequities in income, education, access to health ...

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#SaludTues Bilingual Tweetchat 5/30: Connecting Minority Youth to Opportunity


rwjf county health rankings brownsville latina girl painting

More Latino and Black youth are “disconnected”—not in school and not working—than their White peers, according to recent County Health Rankings data. How can we connect more minority youth to healthy, successful futures? Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, May 30, 2017, to tweet about the latest strategies and resources to connect Latino and other minority youth to opportunities in education, jobs, and civic engagement from the earliest ages into adulthood: WHAT: #SaludTues Bilingual Tweetchat: “Connecting Minority Youth to Opportunity” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, May 30, 2017 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: County Health Rankings (@CHRankings), The United Way (@UnitedWay) Optional hashtags: ...

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