Heavily Latino City among Worst in U.S. with Income Inequality



The term “income inequality” is one that has gained a great deal of attention in recent years. Referring to the “extent” in which income is distributed in an uneven manner in a population. In the U.S., according to the Institute for Policy Studies, the gap between the rich, poor, and everyone else has grown markedly in the past 30 years. The Economic Innovation Group (EIG), a a bipartisan public policy organization created to advancing solutions that empower entrepreneurs and investors to forge a more dynamic economy in the U.S., recently completed a study that determined that San Antonio, Texas (64.34% Latino population), has one of the worst income inequalities in the country. In San Antonio, the gap between the wealthiest zip code in the city and the poorest is among ...

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10% of NYC Public School Students Were Homeless in 2016



During the 2016-17 school year, the number of homeless students in the New York City public school system rose again for the second year in a row. The increase, according to The New York Times, put the overall student population at a shocking milestone: one in every 10 public school students was homeless during the year. These numbers translate into 111,500 students in New York City (28.92% Latino population) that were homeless the last academic year. This was a 6% increase over the 2015-2016 school year. Across New York state, 148,000 students overall were homeless which is 5% of the state’s public school population. “After rising steadily for about five years, the number of homeless students reported to the state shot up in the 2015-16 school year, reaching nearly 100,000 ...

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California to Invest Billions in New Affordable Housing



California state legislators recently approved three bills to boost the supply of local affordable housing. Senate Bills 2, 3, and 35 expect to raise billions to pay to build thousands of new homes for the state’s low-income residents. The bills also also aim to ease local regulations on home-building to help middle-class Californians who are now overwhelmed by costs. “The poverty rate in California, everyone talks about it,” said state Sen. Toni Atkins, author of Senate Bill 2 in an interview with The Los Angeles Times. “Look at everything we do. For child care, for education, for minimum wage, for health care. All those things are significant. And because of housing costs, it negates all those good things.” Action for Affordable Housing More than most states, ...

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SF to Consider Universal Childcare for Residents



$11,000 is a lot of money. You can get a pretty decent car. You can buy a year's worth of groceries to feed a family of four. You could even get 11 of the new iPhone X. Or you can pay a year of childcare for one child. With the average cost of center-based daycare at $11,666 a year, many low-income Latino families struggle to afford childcare. Or it comes at the expense of healthy food or preventive medical care. That's why city leaders in San Francisco (15.3% Latino) are exploring how to provide affordable universal childcare to residents to ease parents' financial burdens. District 6 City Supervisor Jane Kim plans to introduce the measure on the November 2018 ballot. “If we truly believe that families are the backbone of our city, then we all have to do what we can to ...

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New Tool Focuses Equity Lens on Local Policies for Latinos



Hey, city leader... Are your policies and programs equitable for Latinos, Blacks, and other minorities? Fortunately, a new tool helps local governments add an "equity lens" to involve the community and create policies and programs that account for racial/ethnic minorities. The tool, Racial Equity: Getting to Results from the Government Alliance on Race and Equality, enhances the Results-Based Accountability (RBA) methodology to empower policymakers to make “good decisions and advance racial equity.” “Currently across the country, regardless of region, racial inequities exist across every indicator for success—including health, criminal justice, education, jobs, housing, and beyond,” according to the new tool. “We know these inequities are incongruent with our ...

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Celebrating a Culture of Health for Latinos



Two majority-Latino communities are among the eight winners of this year's Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize. Chelsea, MA (62% Latino) and San Pablo, CA (55% Latino) were chosen from 200 applicants along with Algoma, WI, Allen County, KS, Garrett County, MD, Richmond VA, Vicksburg, MS, the Seneca Nation of Indians in Western New York. These communities made strong efforts to ensure their residents have the opportunity to live healthier lives. Winning communities get a $25,000 prize and will have their inspiring stories shared by RWJF. “For the past five years, RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities have inspired hope across the country,” said Dr. Richard Besser, RWJF President and CEO in a news release. “We welcome these eight new prize ...

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Webinars: Walking Toward Justice



Housing segregation caused many social justice issues throughout the 1900s. One big one is neighborhood walkability. You are invited to join America Walks’ quarterly webinar series, Walking Toward Justice, to examine past and present walkability issues in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color, and search for solutions. Charles T. Brown of America Walks, who helped create the series, will moderate each webinar. The first webinar on Sept. 27, 2017 The first webinar of the series, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Government Segregated America, was held at 2 p.m. EST on Sept, 27, 2017. The webinar featured author Richard Rothstein. Rothstein’s book debunks myths about racial discrimination. It also provides evidence of how governments prevented ...

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Report: Latinos Hit Hardest by Housing Market Collapse



When the housing market collapsed in 2006, it led to one of the hardest-hitting, wide-reaching financial crises that the United States had felt in decades. The Great Recession, as it became known, had a disproportionate impact on minorities – especially Latinos – that still impacts their ability to achieve the goal of home ownership. It also keeps many Latinos from fully participating in the economy. A study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis found that the housing prices during the recession fell more in urban, low-income areas and that minorities had far larger shares of their personal wealth “tied up” in their homes than whites. “The housing market collapse affected millions of American families across the country, but it hit black and Latino families ...

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City Looks to Increase Minimum Wage; Faces Resistance from State



Few factors are as important to a person’s health as their income. Millions of Latinos and other minorities struggle to make ends meet financially because of low-wage jobs. Low wages lead to housing instability, food insecurity, and poor health. In recent years, cities across the country have pursued efforts to raise the minimum wage so that workers will have a better chance of getting ahead, accumulating wealth, and provide better living environments for their families. One such example is found in Kansas City, MO (14.54% Latino population), in which voters overwhelmingly approved raising the minimum wage from $7.70 to $10 an hour. This would precede annual increases up to $15 by 2022. “We are so pleased that Kansas City has demonstrated a progressive political perspective ...

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