SF to Consider Universal Childcare for Residents



$11,000 is a lot of money. You can get a pretty decent car. You can buy a year's worth of groceries to feed a family of four. You could even get 11 of the new iPhone X. Or you can pay a year of childcare for one child. With the average cost of center-based daycare at $11,666 a year, many low-income Latino families struggle to afford childcare. Or it comes at the expense of healthy food or preventive medical care. That's why city leaders in San Francisco (15.3% Latino) are exploring how to provide affordable universal childcare to residents to ease parents' financial burdens. District 6 City Supervisor Jane Kim plans to introduce the measure on the November 2018 ballot. “If we truly believe that families are the backbone of our city, then we all have to do what we can to ...

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Do Latinos Live in America’s Most Livable Cities?



Where you live has an impact on almost every aspect of your life. While the U.S. is a rich, diverse country that has attracted people to its cities for centuries, not all of these cities are equal. Some are simply more livable than others. For many Latinos, especially those from low-income families, they often have to live in areas that are high in poverty and crime and often lack access to safe physical activity spaces and healthy food options. America's Most Livable Cities + Latinos In an effort to determine the “best” of these cities, the financial web site 24/7 Wall St. has created an index of the 50 best cities for Americans to live in. What makes a city livable? Some of the factors considered by 24/7 Wall St. include crime rate, economy, and overall ...

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Pediatricians Prescribe Books to Boost Literacy in Latino Families



Pediatricians play a big role in a child's health. But not in the way you might think. Treating flu and other illnesses is only 10% of what makes a person healthy. The rest is genetics (20%), environment (20%), and daily behaviors (50%). That's why it's so important for pediatricians to engage parents and kids to improve daily behaviors—like reading to young children and playing outside—especially among Latinos who have limited safe places to play and early educational gaps. Two amazing reading programs are doing just that. Reach Out and Read Latinos often enter kindergarten developmentally behind their non-Latino peers, Salud America! research shows. For example, as early as age four, children in low-income families hear 30 million fewer words than than their middle and ...

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Poll: More than 3 in 4 Latinos Say Latinos Face Discrimination


Latin family sitting in the street

Three in four U.S. Latinos (78%) believe Latinos face discrimination in America today, compared to 92% of blacks and 55% of whites who say they face discrimination, according to a new poll. Who is doing the discriminating? Nearly half of Latinos (47%) believe personal prejudice is the bigger problem. A smaller amount (37%) say say discrimination based in laws and government policies is the bigger problem. About 14% say they're equally problematic. The data is from a new poll by National Public Radio (NPR), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "Basically what we have found is that discrimination is a type of stressful life experience that has negative effects on health similar to other kinds of stressful experiences," ...

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5 Big Things to Know for Open Enrollment 2018


obamacar ACA health coverage insurance enrollment

Open enrollment for health insurance kicks off today! Millions of people have used the Insurance Marketplace to enroll for healthcare coverage. In fact, the amount of Latinos with no coverage dropped from 26.2% to 15.1% under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) from 2013 to 2016. But it's still much higher than the drop among uninsured whites from 14.1% to 6.6% in that same span, according to a Salud America! research review. How can more people get covered? 5 Things to Know for Open Enrollment 2018 Here are some important things to know for those seeking healthcare coverage: Open Enrollment for 2018 runs from November 1 through December 15, 2017. Coverage begins Jan. 1, 2018, if you buy coverage during this time. You can apply for coverage four ways: online, phone, ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 11/7: Open Enrollment—What You NEED to Know



How can Latinos and all people achieve good health? A good first step is getting health insurance. But 1 in 10 people still don't have coverage, especially among Latinos. Despite making significant gains in coverage since the passing of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Latinos are the largest uninsured population in the nation. In 2015, 15.1% of Latinos lacked health coverage, compared to just 6.6% of whites. Why is this? What can be done? What is being done? With Open Enrollment for health insurance now underway (Nov. 1-Dec. 15, 2017), let’s use #SaludTues on Nov. 7, 2017, to discuss the importance of health care coverage for everyone! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Open Enrollment—What You NEED to Know” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 WHERE: ...

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Researchers Get $82 Million to Push for Minority Health Solutions


group of latino people

A dozen new research centers will tackle Latino and minority health problems thanks to $82 million for the next five years from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Latinos suffer worse rates of obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers and diseases. Why? They face cultural and language barriers, lack of access to resources, and a drastic lack of health care coverage. With this new round of funding, the NIMHD will create 12 "Centers of Excellence" to investigate preventable diseases like heart disease and diabetes, along with exposure to substance abuse, violence, and trauma, which disproportionately affect minorities. “We need strong collaborations and research based upon asking the right questions in specific areas,” said Dr. Eliseo J. ...

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Fewer Latinos Signed Up Online for Health Insurance than Whites, Blacks



Only 1 in 10 who enrolled for healthcare coverage via HealthCare.gov last year were Latino, a lower rate than their black and white peers, according to new federal data. In recent years, Latinos have made health coverage gains under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The percentage of Latinos with no health care coverage dropped from 26.2% to 15.1% from 2013 to 2016 under the Affordable Care Act (ACA); but it remains much higher than the percent drop among uninsured non-Latino whites from 14.1% to 6.6% in that same span, according to a Salud America! research review. The new data demonstrates ongoing disparities. Of HealthCare.gov users who provided racial/ethnic data during the last enrollment period from Nov. 1, 2016 to Jan. 1 2017, 76% were white, 12% black, 10% Asian, and 10% ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/24: Improving Health Literacy and Advocacy For Latinos



About half of Latino adults lack basic health literacy. Health literacy is how well a person understands health info, and uses it to make health decisions. The lower your health literacy, the worse your health. Fortunately, advocates have many ways to improve health literacy in schools and communities! Let's use #SaludTues on Oct. 24, 2017, to share how to push for health literacy among local families, and celebrate #healthliteracymonth! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Healthy Literacy and Advocacy TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Society of Health and Physical Educators (@SHAPE_America); March of Dimes nacer sano  (@nacersano); University of Texas Center for Health Communication ...

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