7 Tips for Latinos to Start a Mental Health Journey



People these days are talking about mental health more than ever before, from real mothers to nonprofit groups to NBA stars to entire TV shows. But it's not always clear how to start your own mental health journey. This is especially unclear among Latinos, who face higher rates of depressive symptoms than many of their peers. And fewer Latinos (8%) than whites (14%) reported that their child had ever used mental health care services, according to a Salud America! research review. "If you’re just embarking on your mental health journey, it’s a scary and stressful time," writes Joe Rodriguez of remezcla.com. 6 Big Tips Rodriguez talked with Latina mental health activist Dior Vargas (formerly of Project UROK) and therapist Omar Torres to create a six-step guide to "help you ...

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No More Us vs. Them: Trauma Training is Rebuilding Police-Community Trust



Police came to four-year-old Fatimah Muhammad’s house in Newark, N.J. (34% Latino), after an altercation between her parents. They came in with force. They had guns. They aggressively grabbed and body-slammed her father before taking him away, Muhammad said. “I was completely terrified,” she said. “Instead of feeling grateful.” As a kid, Muhammad didn’t have a name for some of the traumas that she and her neighborhood were experiencing, like police aggression, domestic violence, and mass incarceration. But she felt an “us vs. them” sense when it came to police. Years later, amid a wave of unlawful policing in Newark, Muhammad helped seize an opportunity to unite police and community to explore trauma and rebuild trust. ‘Unconstitutional’ Law ...

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Call for Help: Mental Health Helpline Coming to South Texas


Hope Famil Health Center mental health warm line

Struggling with behavioral or mental health issues? If you're in South Texas, there will soon be a phone number you can call to get help. Hope Family Health Center is starting a "Warm Line," a phone line that will connect callers to peers who have dealt with and overcome behavioral and mental health issues, The Monitor reports. "There may be somebody that will be going through a crisis or close to a crisis and need somebody to talk to and [they're] isolated and don’t want to call the hospital for help or don’t have the resource," Rebecca Stocker, leader of Hope Family Health Center in McAllen, told The Monitor. "They can call the warm line and speak with someone who has gone through something similar and help them build on their internal resources and move on." How 'Hope ...

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Watch: Salud Hero John Hernandez Joins the 100th Dropout-Prevention Webcast



In the past decade, the National Dropout Prevention Center has aired 99 free webcasts to push for school success and dropout prevention. The 100th webcast, will feature John Hernandez, a Salud America! Salud Hero extraordinaire, on Aug. 14, 2018. Hernandez is the director of student services at East Central Independent School District (ECISD) in San Antonio, TX (68% Latino). He began to uncover that the reasons for student absenteeism went beyond Texas' at-risk indicators—a parent in jail or in hospice, loss of a loved one, immigration or deportation of family members, bullying, food insecurity, unstable housing arrangements, divorce, and many more. So Hernandez started got the support of the ECISD superintendent and started a committee to address these ...

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Program Helps Doctoral Students Give Mental Healthcare to Spanish Speakers



Mental health isn't talked about enough in the Latino community. Even if they want to talk, their doctors are rarely equipped to overcome language and cultural barriers to answer questions. That's starting to change in Missouri. A new residency program is recruiting doctors-in-training to provide Spanish-language mental healthcare services to Latinos in clinics across the state. The program is a collaboration between Ponce Health Sciences University in Puerto Rico, which operates a satellite campus in Missouri, and Compass Health Network, a nonprofit with healthcare clinics serving rural residents across Missouri, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports. "Very few Missouri clinics have therapeutic staff who speak Spanish," according to the news report. "Compass Health Network ...

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Study: How Latino Youth Cope With Stress, Parental Separation


Latino farm boy in poverty and food insecurity

We know that children of migrant workers, who are predominantly Latino, grow up exposed to a high level of trauma, such as neglect, abuse, poverty, and low access to healthy food and safe places to play. Separation between parents and children also is "incredibly harmful," according to a report. Zoe E. Taylor, a researcher at Purdue University who is studying mental health and resiliency in the children of Latino migrant farmworkers, says parent attachment is critical to childhood well-being. "In these populations, teens are used to contributing to the family and the value of family has tremendous cultural significance," Taylor said, in a press release. "These teens may have additional burdens, making this an even more stressful situation. And at the same time, they are often a ...

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‘1 in 5 Minds’ Campaign Urges Sharing Stories to Bust Childhood Mental Health Stigma



"Will they think I’m crazy? Will they think my child is crazy?" Parents and kids worry what other people will think if they talk about childhood mental health issues. Negative stigma often keeps them from seeking help. This isn't news to Michele Brown, vice president of marketing and development at Clarity Children’s Guidance Center in San Antonio, Texas (63.7% Latino). Brown knows the shocking stats all too well: 1 in 5 kids suffer from mental illness. Of those, only 1 in 5 receives treatment. These stats spurred Clarity's "1 in 5 Minds" campaign to share stories, counter mental health stigma, and boost support, Brown said. The Problem of Mental Health Stigma Stigma is when someone, or even you yourself, views a person in a negative way just because they have a ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 7/10: Minority Mental Health: Curing Stigma & Creating Healthier Minds



July is Minority Mental Health Month. Why is it important to acknowledge Minority Mental Health Month? First and foremost, mental illness does not discriminate. However, Latinos are far more likely than their peers to have mental health issues, according to a Salud America! Research Review. Furthermore, these issues often go unaddressed and untreated. Let's use #SaludTues on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 to tweet about promoting healthier minds in communities of color in honor of Minority Mental Health Month. What: #SaludTues Tweetchat – Minority Mental Health: Curing Stigma & Creating Healthier Minds Time/Date: 1-2 P.M. ET (Noon-1 P.M. CT), Tuesday, July 10, 2018 Where: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Mental Health America ...

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Making Mental Healthcare that Works for Latino Youth


austin child guidance center 2

Latinos comprise almost half of all youth in Austin, Texas. These kids are more likely than their peers to deal with mental health issues, from fear of being deported to bullying to financial stress, according to a Salud America! Research Review. And, sadly, these issues go largely untreated. One group—The Austin Child Guidance Center—took notice and is trying to make a positive change. “We’ve just been seeing a lot more fear and a general sense of unpredictability, which raises everybody’s anxiety level,” Julia Hoke, director of psychological services for the Austin Child Guidance Center, told the Austin American Statesman. “We want to be a counterpoint to that.” The Austin Child Guidance Center The center started a task force to meet the needs of their ...

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