Search Results for "water drink"

Tennessee Encourages Community to Drink More Clean Tap Water



The Tennessee Clean Water Network (TCWN) is working on goals to help enforce state and federal anti-pollution laws towards clean water, but also encouraging the state to drink less sugary beverages and instead opt for free, clean tap water. The state is currently dealing with high rates of obesity, at 31.2%, according to a 2014 report, with Latinos at a high rate of obesity at 31.7%. The movement towards drinking more tap water will also help reduce large numbers of plastic beverage bottles being disposed of in the state's landfills, explains a recent article. Efforts have been taken by TCWN to install water fountains in local community areas with messages, such as "Water first for thirst' and decorations of local art on the fountains. The drive to encourage the community to ...

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A Campaign Asks Latino Youth To Drink Tap Water



The Delta Dental of Colorado Foundation and Westwood Unidos are collaborating on a campaign aimed at Latino families and Latino youth to show that tap water is safe to drink daily. The Cavities Get Around campaign is an initiative of The Delta Dental of Colorado Foundation, hoping to eradicate childhood tooth decay and improve oral health for children. According to recent studies, Latino kids ages 0-5 consumption of sugary drinks is higher than the overall average. Rumors of how the tap water may be safe in the Westwood neighborhood has caused many Latino families to believe that the tap water is unsafe to drink. Also, many families are immigrants and are not used to drinking water directly out of the sink, explained Jessica Mahaffey, a marketing specialist for Denver Water in a ...

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Listen to the water fountain and ‘Drink Up’



Many people have heard the phrase, "You need to drink more water." But what if you heard a talking water fountain say that to you? Drink UP, is a collaboration that is working with the Partnership for a Healthier America to encourage everyone to drink more water. Using talking water fountains, and sharing videos online about how everyone should "drink up", they hope to encourage more people to simply drink more water. Bilingual videos are also shared to encourage Latino families to "Bebe Con Ganas". Latino's are more likely to drink more sugary beverages than their peers. Encouraging Latino kids to drink more water is a healthy step towards a healthier life. Watch the talking water fountain ...

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‘Drink Up Philly’ Promotes Water in Corner Stores and Beyond



Drink Up is a new national effort powered by Partnership for Healthier America that has engaged millions of people and brought together nearly 50 supporters from the public and private sector, all committed to encouraging people to drink more water more often. Drink Up Philly will be the first city-focused effort. In the next year, The Food Trust, in partnership with the City of Philadelphia Department of Public Health’s Get Healthy Philly initiative, the Philadelphia Water Department and other local partners, will increase the availability and marketing of water in Philadelphia corner stores, schools, farmers’ markets, and Night Market events, reaching more than half a million residents with the message that water is a healthy choice. This far-reaching campaign ...

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Poll: What’s the Best Way to Get Youths to Drink More Water?



What is the best way to get young people to drink more water? That's the question of a new poll on PreventObesity.net. Answers range from removing local and state taxes on water to banning marketing of sugary drinks to kids to installing free water taps and water bottle-filling stations nationwide. Among Latino youths, consumption of sugary drinks—soft drinks, sports drinks, fruit-flavored drinks, and other caloric but non-nutritious beverages—is higher than the overall average, which contributes to increased rates of obesity, diabetes, and other health issues that disproportionately affect Latinos, according to a research review by Salud America!, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation research network on Latino childhood obesity that is based at the Institute for Health Promotion ...

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Hydration Stations Start a Water-Drinking Movement in Washington



Latinos are the fastest-growing minority group in Washington State. Because Latino kids tend to drink more sugary drinks than their White peers, healthy beverage policies have the potential to impact Latino kids’ health in big ways. In Washington, community partners are teaming-up with schools and lawmakers to come up with ways to encourage kids to quench their thirst with water, not sugar. EMERGENCE Awareness/Learn: Childhood obesity is a problem in the state of Washington, which is 11% Latino. In 2012, 25% of Washington children ages 2-4 who received benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC; Latinos comprise about 41% of WIC participants) were overweight or obese, according to the state’s Department of Health. About 23% ...

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Study: Availability of Drinking Water in U.S. Public School Cafeterias



Starting in the 2011-12 school year, schools participating in the federally-funded National School Lunch Program were required to provide students with access to free drinking water during school meals, in the location where meals are served. New research by Bridging the Gap describes how schools are meeting this requirement and provides insight about the cleanliness of drinking fountains. The report found that most participating schools met the water requirements, but that there is still work to be done to improve water quality and access. Check out the full research ...

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Swapping Sugary Drinks for Water Coolers For a Healthy Start



Research shows that children who consume too many sugary drinks risk developing diseases related to unhealthy weight. Latino children, because they tend to consume more sugary drinks than their peers, are at an even higher risk. Health leaders, school officials, and parents in one Latino community in California worked to create a policy to bump sugary drinks out of early-childcare centers and help kids fall in love with water at a young age. EMERGENCE Awareness: More than 44% of children overall in Madera County, Calif., are overweight or obese, and Latino children have even higher rates. Public health groups across California are recognizing these issues and working to reduce them. CA4Health, directed by the Public Health Institute (PHI) in California, is a statewide healthy-living ...

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The First Lady Urges Kids to Drink More Water



In the newest effort to combat childhood obesity in United States, the Partnership for America's Health along with First Lady Michelle Obama has launched a new campaign to encourage kids and adults alike to drink more water, Drink Up. The First Lady helped kick-off the campaign in Watertown, Wisconsin, and spoke at a local high school According to the press release, In the next year, supporters will carry the Drink Up logo on nearly 300 million packs of bottle water; more than half a billion bottles of water; 200,000 packages of reusable bottles; and more than 10,000 reusable bottles. Additionally, more than 10,000 outdoor public taps are expected to carry the brand over the next few years. Check out ...

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