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“A Fit Family With Help from the School”



Christine Sinatra, mom to a kindergartner attending an Austin Independent School District school, talks about how brain breaks and FitnessGram help to create a healthy learning environment for children. In this blog she asks parents to support her quest for keeping FitnessGram in Schools. ...

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“Active Video Games Can Battle Childhood Obesity”



Although video games are often viewed in a negative context, for possibly keeping kids from participating in physical activity, researchers from George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services in Washington, D.C., are finding that active video games may provide a new avenue for kids to participate in physical activity. Already many schools have begun to use interactive video games as part of their curriculum. ...

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“Advocacy Works! GDOT Adopts Complete Streets Policy”



This blog recounts the story of how bike advocates pushed for the development of a Complete Streets Policy in Georgia. Interestingly, some officials working with the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) were under the impression that a Complete Streets Policy was already in place. It took the efforts of bike advocates to create awareness that such a policy did not in fact exist. Soon GDOT created a task force to create a Complete Streets Policy and on September 20, 2012 the policy was enacted. ...

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“Amarillo Region PE Teacher Workshop”



A group of 75 teachers attended an in-service at Canyon Independent School District’s Gene Howe Elementary gymnasium to learn about bike safety. BikeTexas was invited by PE teacher Janet Sheen to train educators, using the SuperCyclist Curriculum 2.2 Teacher Master Page Series. This event allowed teachers from throughout the district to learn how they can encourage their students to bike to school using "6 simple steps." ...

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“Are NJ students getting enough exercise at school?”



Three individuals discuss their support of legislation that would give elementary school students in New Jersey 20 minutes of recess a day, by law. ...

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Initiative Challenges Latino Familes to Go a ‘Day Without Sugar’



Unhealthy diets are a big contributor to the Latino childhood obesity epidemic. A new initiative is calling for Latino children and their families to embrace a healthier diet by limiting their sugar intake. For the Day Without Sugar Challenge, launched by Arte Público Press, the nation’s largest and oldest publisher of U.S. Hispanic literature, participants are encouraged to complete one full day without any sugary drinks, candies, cookies, or sweet baked goods, and avoid foods with added sugars. The initiative encourages community organizations, educators and families to address the issue of high sugar consumption, which can contribute to the risks of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 9 teaspoons of sugar per ...

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Latino Family Will be Featured in Diabetes Documentary



San Antonio residents Myra Martinez and her 17-year-old son, both diabetics, will be featured in a documentary about the health condition, WOAI-TV reports. Filming is taking place at the Texas Diabetes ...

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Spanish Report: Summit Tackles Problem of Latino Childhood Obesity



Last week in San Antonio, the 4th Annual Salud America! Summit brought together experts from around the country to discuss the latest advancements to reduce and prevent Latino childhood obesity. Learn more in this Univision video news report by Monica Navarro about Salud America!, a national research network funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and directed by the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. The video features Salud America! director Dr. Amelie ...

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Report: Becoming an American Can Be Bad for Your Health



A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes, according to a New York Times report. According to the report: For Hispanics, now the nation’s largest immigrant group, the foreign-born live about three years longer than their American-born counterparts, several studies have found. Why does life in the United States — despite its sophisticated health care system and high per capita wages — lead to worse health? New research is showing that the immigrant advantage wears off with the adoption of American behaviors — smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles. Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of the Salud America! Latino ...

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