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Study: Liver Cancer in Latinos Linked to Diabetes, Obesity



Liver cancer rates among South Texas Latinos are higher than in other U.S. Latinos, as are their rates of obesity and diabetes—and the relationships between these ailments are being mapped by researchers at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday. In a study published April 18, 2012, in the journal PLoS ONE, the researchers looked at overall liver cancer rates among U.S. Latinos and compared this to a Texas sample and a South Texas subset from 1995-2006. They also compared prevalence among Latinos of lifestyle-associated factors that contribute to liver cancer: heavy alcohol use, smoking, obesity and diabetes. They found that from 1995 to 2006, annual age-adjusted liver cancer incidence ...

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Clinical Trials and You



A new National Institutes of Health website, NIH Clinical Research Trials and You, is designed to help people learn about clinical trials and how they can participate. The resource, offered in English and Spanish, answers basic questions such as What are clinical trials and why do people participate? and What do I need to know if I am thinking about participating? In addition, the website offers volunteer stories, researcher stories and educational resources. You can also get help finding a clinical ...

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Where to Locate Schools? What to Consider – and Why It Matters



Forty years ago, nearly half of all students walked or biked to school. Now, only 14 percent do. Why the change? One major factor is school siting, the decisions school leaders make about where to build or rehabilitate schools. Over the past several decades, schools have increasingly been built on the outskirts of communities, too far from children’s homes for walking or biking to be practical. Meanwhile, obesity rates in children and adolescents have more than tripled, and a third of children are overweight or obese. Locating schools closer to where families live can make it easier for kids to walk and bike to school—and more convenient for families to use school fields and other facilities after hours, when school is closed. When it comes to ethnicity and socioeconomic ...

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New Guide Can Help Open School Property to the Public for Physical Activity



Nearly a third of U.S. kids and adolescents are overweight or obese, especially minority groups, including Latinos. Many are urged to get more exercise but can’t follow this advice very easily where they live. Schools, for instance, have many recreational facilities—gyms, soccer fields, tracks, basketball courts, playgrounds, even swimming pools—but they keep them closed after hours due to security, liability and maintenance concerns. But communities around the country are resolving these issues through what’s known as a joint use agreement: a written contract between a school district and, usually, a city agency, spelling out a formal arrangement that lets the two share the costs and maintenance and liability responsibilities. Playing Smart is a new nuts-and-bolts ...

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Highlighting the Need for Diverse Health Care Fields



Editor’s Note: This post is part of an ongoing series that will highlight the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s work in Latino communities across the country. On May 5, 2012, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) will team up to provide Hispanic media with an in-depth look at a health care issue that’s key to the Latino community. The panel discussion, “Reflection in the Mirror: Latino leaders inspire young Hispanics to see themselves in the health and health care field,” will address the importance of diversifying this country’s health and health care fields. Prominent Latinos will detail their respective journeys and the importance of having health professionals reflect the communities in which they ...

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Exposure to Recreation Center Increases Use by Latino Families with Children



Community recreation centers that develop culturally tailored programs that invite Latino families inside can increase sustained use of the center for physical activity in this population at heightened risk for childhood obesity, according to a new study in Childhood Obesity. Living near community recreation centers (CRC) is associated with increases in adolescent and adult physical activity. However, the efficacy of efforts to increase use among Latino parents and children is unknown. So researchers, led by Dr. Shari Barkin, a Vanderbilt University researcher and grantee of Salud America!, compared 66 Latino parent–child pairs who had participated in a culturally tailored healthy lifestyle program at a community recreation center and completed a 12-month follow-up ...

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New-Look Nutrition Icon Tags ‘Heart-Healthy’ Foods



The American Heart Association (AHA) has introduced a fresh, new look to its nationally recognized nutrition icon—the Heart-Check mark. More types of food can now be certified as heart-healthy, including fish and nuts, to help meet the AHA's goal of dramatically improving the nation's cardiovascular health. All shoppers need to do at the grocery store is look for the familiar Heart-Check mark to find foods that make the heart-healthy grade. “With these enhancements, the Heart-Check program will help consumers easily identify and choose even more heart-healthy foods for themselves and their families,” said Dr. Rachel Johnson, a professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont and the vice chair of the American Heart Association nutrition committee. Foods such as salmon ...

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South Texas Study Seeks to Motivate Breast Cancer Survivors to Get Fit



Do encouraging, personalized messages, received on a regular basis, inspire women to exercise after they’ve been treated for breast cancer? To find out, the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio is enrolling Hispanic survivors of breast cancer for a 16-week clinical research exercise study conducted in South Texas' Lower Rio Grande Valley to address this topic. Changed thinking that leads to self-confidence leads to changed behavior—that’s the idea behind the study. The study requires two visits to the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio's Regional Academic Health Center campus in Harlingen to answer questionnaires, do a complete physical fitness assessment and develop each woman’s individualized comprehensive ...

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The Latest Advances in Fighting Latino Childhood Obesity



How do: Researchers contribute to policy changes for healthier cities? (Pg 1) Hunger and obesity become the focus of a TV series? (Pg 3) Latino tiendas differ in healthy food options? (Pg 4) Find the answers and more in the new Salud America! E-Newsletter. Also check out much more news, research and funding inside the E-newsletter, and discover the preliminary research results of a quartet of Salud America! grantees working in Latino after-school programs, community recreational centers and more. Salud America!, which is dedicated to preventing Latino childhood obesity, is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and is headquartered at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind ...

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