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How to Overcome Latino Children’s Low Physical Activity Levels



Editor's Note: This is Part 3 of a series on new Salud America! research briefs examining Latino youth nutrition, physical activity and marketing. Today's focus is physical activity. Preventing obesity among Latino youth will require a sizeable decrease in energy intake and/or a reciprocal increase in physical activity. A new Salud America! research brief shows that: Latino parents report more barriers to their children’s physical activity than do white parents, including transportation problems, concerns about neighborhood safety, and the expense and availability of local recreation opportunities. Latino children living in lower-income communities and unsafe neighborhoods are more likely to be physically inactive, overweight and/or obese. Immigrant Latino children are ...

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VIDEOS: Training on Patient Navigation & Latino Cancer Issues



Redes En Acción: The National Latino Cancer Research Network has released three videos on cancer issues and research methods that were used to train Redes En Acción researchers and patient navigators in Miami and San Antonio and Austin, Texas, who are involved in a study examining how patient navigators who use the LIVESTRONG Cancer Navigation Services Program can improve the quality of life of Latino breast, colorectal and prostate cancer survivors. The videos are designed specifically for the study, funded by the National Cancer Institute; but the videos may be useful in any patient navigator studies involving Latinos. Video 1 teaches researchers and patient navigators the proper steps on how to manage a potential mental health emergency or psychological related emergency that may ...

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Latino Children Struggle to Avoid Unhealthy Foods



Editor's Note: This is Part 2 of a series on new Salud America! research briefs examining Latino youth nutrition, physical activity and marketing. Today's focus is nutrition. The modern urban environment, replete with convenience stores and fast-food restaurants, has provided easy access to generally unhealthy foods and beverages, while not always providing access to healthy ones, especially in Latino communities. A new Salud America! research brief shows that: Families and youth residing in low-income, Latino neighborhoods often face limited access to supermarkets, chain grocery stores and healthy foods. Latino high school students have greater access to both unhealthy and healthy food choices than do other high school students. Compared with the national average, food ...

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Marketing Has Heavy Influence on Latino Childhood Obesity



Editor's Note: This is Part 1 of a series on new Salud America! research briefs examining Latino youth nutrition, physical activity and marketing. Today's focus is marketing. As with other children and adolescents, marketing may also have a powerful influence on the health behaviors of Latino youth. A new Salud America! research brief shows that: The amount of time young people spend with entertainment media has risen dramatically, particularly among Latinos. Latinos are avid users of digital media, including the Internet and mobile phones, among other new media platforms (e.g., Facebook, MySpace). Latino youth, have been identified as an important target market segment among fast-food and soda companies. Children viewing Spanish-language TV in the U.S. are heavily exposed ...

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VIDEO: Challenges to Healthy Eating Along the Texas-Mexico Border



Food access and mobile food vendors make eating healthy food a challenge in Texas colonias—rural, predominantly Latino settlements along the U.S.-Mexican border that often lack water, electricity, and other infrastructure. Check out a video discussion of colonia issues with Dr. Joseph Sharkey, a professor at The Texas A&M Health Sciences Center and a Healthy Eating Research ...

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Èxito! Grad Testimonial: Maria Priscilla Brietzke



Editor's Note: This is the testimonial of a graduate of the 2011 Summer Institute of Èxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training. Read more testimonials here or apply by March 1 for the 2012 Èxito! program. Maria Priscilla Brietzke Houston, Texas After seeing how media can help improve Latinas’ health behavior during a practicum along the Texas-Mexico Border, Maria Priscilla Brietzke believes that small changes have big power to help the disadvantaged. Brietzke, who currently is a research assisting at the University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston School of Nursing, is focusing on making both small and large changes in age-related chronic illness. Because she had questions about balancing work and life in a doctoral-level research career, she took a friend’s ...

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Hispanics Urged to Get Flu Vaccine



For National Influenza Vaccination Week Dec. 4-10, 2011, the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) is inviting Hispanics ages 6 months and older to get vaccinated against the influenza. The first and most important step to protect against flu is to get vaccinated, according to the CDC's Spanish-language flu website. The vaccine reduces one's risk of illness, hospitalization, or even death and can prevent the spread of the virus to loved ones. There is good news: More Hispanic children, 43 percent, have been vaccinated this year than black children at 36 percent or white children at 34 percent, UPI reports. Go to flu.gov in English or Spanish to learn ...

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Chat Live on Facebook with Hispanic Health Expert on 12/7/11



The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Effective Health Care Program will host a live chat on its Spanish-language Facebook page with Scientific Review Officer Dr. Ileana Ponce-Gonzalez at 2 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011. This Facebook live chat is part of AHRQ’s recently launched Toma las riendas campaign, a nationwide effort to encourage Hispanics to take control of their health and explore treatment options. The campaign promotes a wide variety of resources produced by the Effective Health Care Program, such as consumer-friendly publications that summarize treatment options for common health conditions and help Hispanics work with their health care teams to select the best possible treatment option. Access to reliable information is essential when ...

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Latino Father Helps Pediatric Cancer Patients and Their Families Travel to Chemotherapy Appointments



Editor’s Note: This post is part of an ongoing series that will highlight the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s work in Latino communities across the country. When his only child Emilio died of cancer shortly before his sixth birthday, Richard Nares found his world was shattered. As he and his wife tried to put their lives back together, Nares realized his priorities had changed. “All I wanted to do was help other families who were going through what we went through,” said Nares, who was an artist and picture framer. Putting his family’s tragedy and hard-earned knowledge to use, Nares and his wife Diane established the Emilio Nares Foundation to transport underprivileged families whose children are battling cancer to their medical visits at Rady Children’s Hospital ...

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