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Minorities Still Face Daunting Transportation Issues in U.S.



Many of us are familiar with the historic connection between civil rights and transportation, from Plessy vs. Ferguson in the 1890s to the Montgomery Bus Boycott in the 1960s, writes Angela Glover Blackwell, founder and CEO of PolicyLink, in a recent e-mail to PolicyLink followers. Today, transportation remains a 21st century civil rights issue for minorities and low-income people. For example, nearly 20% of African American households, 14% of Latino households, and 13% of Asian households lack access to automobiles, compared with nearly 5% of white households. Also, nearly 60 percent of public transportation riders are people of color. For decades, advocates all over have continued to push for much-needed reforms in America’s transportation policies that will help ...

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Cancer Survival and the Hispanic Paradox



A new study of cancer survival among Hispanics found important variations by Hispanic subgroup. The study, published in the journal Cancer Causes Control, indicates that, for cancers of moderate outcome, the adjusted risk of death was higher among all Hispanic populations in comparison with non-Hispanic Whites: 6% higher for Cubans, 11% for Puerto Ricans, and 13% for U.S.-born Mexicans. Foreign-born Mexicans, even with incomplete follow-up, had a 24% higher risk of death. No evidence of a Hispanic advantage was found in cancer survival. The researchers, who studied all 1.2 million cancer cases diagnosed during 1995-2003 in Florida and Texas, suggest improvements are needed in mortality follow-up procedures for Latinos, especially for those without a valid social security number. "By ...

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San Antonio School District Transforms Cafeterias into Healthy Cafés



Students at Northside Independent School District cafeterias in San Antonio are noticing changes as they choose their food. New options are fresh fruit bowls, veggies, salads, lean meats and whole-grain rolls. Gone are white-flour breads, high-fat cheese, fried food and sodas. Even the cafeteria name is gone—“café” has taken its place. The Northside Child Nutrition Department has spent $1.5 million over the last two years to provide more fresh fruits and salads, and new entrée options with less sodium and fat, in order to improve access to healthy foods. The district also has revamped the marketing of its healthy foods and has a mascot named NIC (Nutrition Instructional Chimp) to visit schools and tout healthy choices. “If you take this food away from the ...

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Free Bilingual Children’s Books Teach Healthy Lifestyles to Latino Kids



A Latino boy plays soccer and encourages kids to play and eat right. A Latina girl and her classmates learn about “veggie cousins.” These are two storylines from the new ¡Salud, familia! children’s book series, from Houston-based publisher Arte Público Press, in which young protagonists make choices about healthy eating and active lifestyles to reduce Latino childhood obesity and diabetes. The free books are distributed free through community partners to low-income Hispanic families with school-aged children in both urban and rural areas across the U.S. “Childhood obesity and diabetes among Latinos are already at pandemic levels; we hope to positively influence Latino attitudes towards healthy lifestyles and nutrition at the grass-roots and policy levels,” said ...

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See Who’s Stepping Up Vs. Latino Child Obesity



How can... Bilingual kids' books teach Latinos about healthy lifestyles? (Page 1) School cafeterias transform into healthy cafés? (Page 3) Researchers more easily investigate American childhood obesity? (Page 4) Find the answers and more in the latest Salud America! E-newsletter. Also find out the latest in Latino childhood obesity policy, news and updates on Salud America!, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) network to prevent obesity among Latino kids. The network is directed by the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, which developed SaludToday. To sign up to receive Salud America! E-newsletters, go ...

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Arthritis Takes Varying, Heavy Toll on Hispanic Groups



Rates of arthritis vary among different Hispanic groups, but its overall effects appear to be substantial across groups, according to an analysis of national CDC survey data, MedPage Today reports. According to the report: Subgroups of Hispanic patients reported different rates of doctor-diagnosed arthritis, with 11.7% of Cubans and Cuban-Americans saying they had some form of arthritis, compared with 21.8% of Puerto Ricans -- similar to rates of 22.6% among non-Hispanic whites and 21.4% among non-Hispanic blacks, reported Louise Murphy, PhD, of the CDC, and colleagues. At the same time, more than 20% of all Hispanic subgroups with some form of arthritis also reported suffering one or more of its effects -- activity and work limitations and severe joint pain -- Murphy and her ...

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Hispanics, Other Minorities Less Likely to Get Treatment for Depression



The percentage of white adolescents who received any major depression treatment was higher (40%) than blacks (32%), Hispanics (31%), and Asians (19%), according to a new study. Black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents were also significantly less likely than whites to receive treatment for major depression from mental health professionals or medical providers, and to have any mental health outpatient visits (all after adjusting for demographics and health status). The adjustment for socioeconomic status and health insurance status accounted for only a small portion of the estimated differences in major depression treatment measurements and outpatient utilization across racial/ethnic groups. Other factors, such as stigma and limited proficiency in English, possibly contributed to ...

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Educating Hispanics About Diabetes is Critical



For clinicians providing health care for vulnerable populations, such as low-income patients, ethnic minorities or immigrants who speak little English, educating about the risks of diabetes can be daunting, but it is especially critical among Hispanics, the Clinical Advisor reports. Health care practitioners may need to navigate language barriers, cultural differences and health-literacy challenges to effectively educate patients, according to the news report.  Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. Hispanics face many grim diabetes disparities, according to the report: 10.5% percent of Hispanics ages 20 or older have diabetes 8.2% percent of Cubans 11.9% percent of Mexican Americans 12.6% percent of Puerto Ricans Other data show that Hispanics ...

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Liver Cancer Rapidly Increasing in Latino Men in California



Rates of liver cancer in U.S.-born Hispanic men in California have increased by 87%, according to scientists at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California (CPIC), who looked at a recent 16-year span of statewide cancer registry data, Hispanically Speaking News reports. These men are at a significantly higher risk of liver cancer than California Hispanic men born outside of the U.S. Liver cancer risk is also higher among both Hispanic males and females in more ethnically isolated and lower income areas of the state. The results of this study, which is the first to examine liver cancer rates by neighborhood acculturation level and socioeconomic status, were recently published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. “California Health Interview Survey data show ...

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