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Finally, Some Good News for the Health Insurance of Latino Kids



Latino kids and adults experienced historic increases in healthcare coverage when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded the amount of resources to Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). But CHIP is set to expire on Sept. 30, 2017. Fortunately, good news is on the horizon for CHIP and kids. The U.S. Senate recently announced a bipartisan deal for funding to extend the “life” of the program, The New York Times reports. The new agreement would fund CHIP for an additional five years. Bill Frist, a Forbes contributor and former legislator, urged legislators to finalize the extension. "Healthier children. A more productive workforce. Less financial ruin for working families," Frist said of the benefits of CHIP. The impact of CHIP CHIP was ...

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Celebrating a Culture of Health for Latinos



Two majority-Latino communities are among the eight winners of this year's Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize. Chelsea, MA (62% Latino) and San Pablo, CA (55% Latino) were chosen from 200 applicants along with Algoma, WI, Allen County, KS, Garrett County, MD, Richmond VA, Vicksburg, MS, the Seneca Nation of Indians in Western New York. These communities made strong efforts to ensure their residents have the opportunity to live healthier lives. Winning communities get a $25,000 prize and will have their inspiring stories shared by RWJF. “For the past five years, RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities have inspired hope across the country,” said Dr. Richard Besser, RWJF President and CEO in a news release. “We welcome these eight new prize ...

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A Unique Way to Help Latino Families Avoid Unneeded ER Trips



Too often, a lack of healthcare coverage forces Latinos into the emergency room for non-emergency healthcare. Now, thanks to a new grant, the Center for Healthy Neighborhoods at California State University-Fullerton (CSUF) will create a promotores program to help local Latino families avoid unnecessary ER trips, according to The Orange County Register. Why are ER trips an issue? The community in Fullerton, Calif. (35.24% Latino population), faces numerous obstacles that prevent them from obtaining quality health care, which leads to extremely high rates of preventable ER visits, according to Kaiser Health Foundation-Anaheim. These obstacles include being “linguistically isolated,” lacking awareness, and affordability. How the new program will reduce ER trips The $40,000 ...

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Latino Group, U.S. Army Team Up to Promote STEM among High Schoolers



The science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce is no more diverse than it was 20 years ago. In fact, less than 2% of the STEM workforce is Latino youth, although they make up about 20% of the population, according to a factsheet by the U.S. Department of Education. Vacant STEM jobs and gaps in this growing career field mean gaps in income, health, and quality of life. It also means Americans lag behind in: advancing alternative energy source curing diseases predicting natural disasters preventing cybercrime protecting our citizens securing sustainable food supply In order to promote STEM careers among Latino youth, we need to improve STEM programming beginning as early as preschool, promote STEM programs for Latinos, and boost high school ...

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Largest Urban Natural Area in Texas Gets Natural Playscape and Discovery Trail



Texas State Parks are opening new natural play areas for children and people with disabilities to play and connect with nature. Latino kids in Texas (39.1% Latino), and across the country, lack safe outdoor places to play and be active, which is known as a nature deficit disorder. Families struggle to find green space that is both fun and appropriate for all age ranges. Particularly Latino families, which are often multigenerational. Childhood development leaders, architects, educators and urban planners worked together to design plans for natural playscapes in various outdoor spaces, like state parks, local parks, zoos, and botanical gardens to better engage kids and families with nature. Natural playscapes are designed to be built using natural materials and include boulders, ...

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Fresno Community Blue and Green Spaces Program Opens School Pools


Latino Health pools blue space swimming

Schools in Fresno, CA (52.8% Latino) opened their green and blue spaces to the public. Green spaces are parks, playgrounds, sports fields and other outdoor play spaces. Blue spaces are swimming pools, lakes and rivers. Latino kids lack safe green and blue spaces, thus face higher rates of chronic disease, drowning, and drowning related injuries compared to white kids. In June 2016, the Fresno Parks, After School, Recreation, and Community Services Department (PARCS) started a new Weekend Recreation and Fitness Program (WRFP) to get help kids and families stay more active. With a $1.2 million dollar budget from the City of Fresno, Fresno Unified School District, and Central Unified School District, they opened school facilities, like playgrounds, sports fields and green space, ...

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Mississippi Governor Urges Training Day Care Workers to Improve Early Education



The first few years are critical for preparing kids for life, yet early childcare employees are the least prepared. They often only have a high school degree, thus aren’t equipped to give kids the care and services they need during their formative years. Mississippi Governor, Phil Bryant, told residents at the Neshoba County Fair in July 2017 that he plans to improve early childhood education across the state by training day care workers. He hopes to use federal and state funds to provide training through the state’s 15 community colleges, at no cost to the workers, according to one source. According to Governor Bryant’s Twitter account, “Our community colleges are now educating our childcare workers on early childhood education best practices. Our children deserve the ...

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How to Help Latinos Enroll, Graduate from College


Learning latin female student with curly hair

Did you know: In King County, Washington (9.28% Latino population), only 1 in 4 of all Latino high-school graduates go on to earn a college degree? This is in stark contrast to the region’s 1 in 2 Asian and white students who earn a degree. In an effort to help Latinos both enroll in and succeed in college once they get there, Highline College has created the innovative Puente program. As part of this initiative, just 25 students – most are first-generation Latino students who are the first members of their families to attend college – are “banded” together for the course of their studies. Culturally focused learning community Education determines a lot about a person’s life. Education factors into their health, where they live, their access to resources, and their ...

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Latino Parents Suing for Equity in Education in Massachusetts



Latino parents in Holyoke, MA (49.49% Latino population) have taken drastic measures in an effort to achieve a better standard of education equity for their children, according to The Boston Globe. In August 2017, the group Padres de Latinos de las Escuelas de Springfield y Holyoke (PLESH) filed a lawsuit against the Holyoke Public School District claiming that there was a failing to “provide adequate translation of educational documents” for parents with limited English proficiency. Nearly half of the 5,300 students in Holyoke live in homes where English isn’t the primary language. Per The Boston Globe report, 80% of all students in the district are Latino and the lawsuit focuses heavily on minority children in special education. “Nothing has changed,” said Glorimar ...

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