Search Results for "rural"

Dr. David Acosta: Meeting the Need for Latinos in Medicine



Growing up, David Acosta was blessed to be part of a loving Latino family with his mother and father, four brothers, and an abuelita in Southern California.   They found joy in helping each other and others.  Acosta realized in childhood he wanted to choose a future career that would bring joy to others – he decided to become a doctor.  "I knew from an early age that I wanted to go into medicine and help out,” Acosta said. “My family [was] probably most instrumental in me going down this path.”  Acosta went on to get his medical degree, practice medicine, and now serves as chief diversity and inclusion officer at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).    But his path wasn’t always easy.  The Cultural Side of Medicine   Acosta was ...

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#SaludTues 10/3/2023: Addressing Inadequate Transportation to Improve Health


Addressing Inadequate Transportation to Improve Health

Many Americans face transportation barriers that threaten quality of life. When burdened by transportation costs and lack of safe, feasible options, families are forced to make tradeoffs, such as foregoing spending on food and medications or skipping trips to essential destinations such as medical care, the grocery store, workforce development, and other resources, and services. Inadequate transportation not only contributes to inequities in health but also contributes to inequities in social and economic outcomes which exacerbate inequities in health. To reduce inequities and improve overall health, we need both individual-level and community-level strategies to mitigate the symptoms and consequences of inadequate transportation. Let’s use #SaludTues on October 3, 2023, ...

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Join Komen’s Patient Navigation Training Program



Susan G. Komen, a national breast cancer research and advocacy organization, has launched its Navigation Nation interactive learning community for patient navigators – those who help guide cancer patients to overcome barriers toward quality healthcare.  The program brings individuals through a Patient Navigation Training Program and access to courses, webinars, and other educational events.  “The training program gives navigators the tools and resources to overcome barriers for those experiencing breast health inequities and provides a peer network and support system,” according to the Komen website.    Learn more about this free program and what it entails, and how you can join.   What is Komen’s Patient Navigation Training Program?  This program was designed ...

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CDC: Mistreatment During Maternity Care Contributes to Maternal Health Disparities


mistreatment maternity care

Despite the heaviest spending on healthcare, the United States has the highest maternal mortality rate among developed nations. Sadly, this historic trend has worsened over time and disproportionately impacts women of color. The reasons for America’s maternal health crisis is multi-faceted, but a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs survey highlights one potential reason for this worsening health trend – mistreatment of women by healthcare workers during pregnancy and delivery care. Let’s explore the survey results and how mistreatment during maternity care affects Latinas and all women. Mistreatment During Maternity Care for Women of Color The survey, which included data from 2,402 women, found that 1 in 5 women (20%) experienced ...

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Rosa Escalante Lopez: Resilient Latina Overcomes Health Crisis to Help Latinos Heal Invisible Wounds



A young Rosa Escalante Lopez curiously looked around the therapist’s room as her mother and the therapist chatted in Spanish. “The elementary school thinks she may have a learning disability,” Rosa’s mother said. “She’s struggling in math.” “According to my evaluation, your daughter is developing normally,” the therapist said with a smile. “She can continue to the next grade; she may just need extra tutoring in her math class.” As the two continued to talk, Rosa reflected on her session with the therapist. She was fascinated with the idea of helping people heal a wound that may not be visible, such as a learning disability or a mental health condition. “In my last year of elementary school, I remember thinking, ‘I'm going to be a psychologist and ...

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Banker Turned Psychiatrist: How Dr. Octavio N. Martinez, Jr. Found His Calling


Dr. Martinez cover

“Now remember, you must return your books on time,” said the librarian at the local public library in Austin, Texas. She peered down at 6-year-old Octavio N. Martinez, Jr., who eagerly nodded in agreement. She smiled and handed the child his first library card. From there, Octavio fell in love. Hard. He loved books and became a ferocious reader. With each page turn, his passion for learning grew. By the time he reached sixth grade, he knew he was destined for college and had even earned the nickname “professor” among his friends. Now a grown man, Dr. Octavio N. Martinez, Jr. has since earned four college degrees, including a Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health. He is also one of the nation’s leading mental health advocates and philanthropists, ...

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Serving the Medically Underserved: Guadalupe Clinic Brings Goodwill to Wichita Latinos


Guadalupe Clinic patient

The drive to Guadalupe Clinic from rural Coffeyville, Kansas, was just over two hours, but it felt like a lifetime for the Pascual family. As their older vehicle putted along the back roads, the Pascuals anxiously awaited much-needed medical care. With no health insurance and limited income, getting basic healthcare was a constant struggle. Finally, the family’s car turned onto St. Francis Street in downtown Wichita, Kansas. Their destination was nestled between two scrap metal yards and surrounded by railroads and small housing lots. Pulling into the parking lot, the Pascuals breathed a sigh of relief. They had safely reached the Guadalupe Clinic and were welcomed with open arms – no questions asked. For families like the Pascuals, Guadalupe Clinic in Wichita, ...

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How Many Latinos Graduate College?



About half of Latinos who enroll in a four-year college do not end up graduating, according to a new analysis from ¡Excelencia in Education!  Latinos’ college graduation rate (52%) also is lower than their White peers (65%).   How can we increase Latino college graduation rates?   Let’s dive into to the numbers and explore how to close the Latino education gap, and better support Latino students.    Latino College Graduation by the Numbers  28% of Latino adults (age 25 and older) currently have an associate degree or higher, compared to 48% of non-Latino White adults.  To better understand that gap, the new analysis from ¡Excelencia in Education! highlights 4 measures that track degree completion:  1. Graduation Rate: Total percentage of students who ...

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Thomas Brittain Dedicates Retirement Years to Caregiving; “It Could Be You That Needs Care One Day.”


thomas brittain

Thomas Brittain and his immediate family gathered in the neurologist’s office, eager to hear the health status of their beloved family member, 67-year-old Sarah Cadena. “Your mother has a cognitive impairment,” the neurologist said. “We recommend that she transition to living with family for her own safety.” Without a second thought, the Brittain family began planning how to care for Sarah Cadena. That was 13 years ago. Since then, Sarah Cadena has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, a disease that can lead to progressive memory loss and ability to perform daily activities. Thomas, Sarah Cadena’s son, a retired San Antonio police officer, is now her primary caretaker. Sarah Cadena lives with Thomas and his family, and as far as caretaking goes, Thomas said he and ...

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