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Cliff Despres

Cliff Despres, who has more than a decade of experience in journalism and public relations, is communications director for Salud America! and its home base, the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio.


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Articles by Cliff Despres

Apply Now: Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Training and Internships!


Exito-Research-Leadership-Training-Group-Shot-2019-applynow

Apply now for the 2021 Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training program and optional $3,250 internships from the Institute for health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio! Each year, Éxito! recruits 25 U.S. master’s level students and professionals to participate in a five-day, culturally tailored Éxito! summer institute to promote pursuit of a doctoral degree and cancer research. COVID-19 postponed the 2020 Éxito! program. Now applications for 2021 are open with limited spots available. At the next Éxito! summer institute, set for June 7 -11, 2021, in San Antonio, participants will interact with Latino researchers, mentors, and doctoral experts. They will learn about Latino cancer, succeeding in a doctoral program, and the diversity of careers ...

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Get Help Quitting Smoking for the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 19!


man quitting and stopping smoking by smashing cigarettes

You don't have to stop smoking in one day. Start with Day 1. On Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, you can join thousands of people who will begin their smoke-free journey with the Great American Smokeout. This annual event from the American Cancer Society encourages smokers to make a plan to stop smoking. Need help? Sign up for Quitxt, a free English or Spanish text-message service that turns your phone into a personal "quit smoking" coach from UT Health San Antonio. To join Quitxt, text "iquit" (for English) or "lodejo" (for Spanish) to 844-332-2058. "For the Great American Smokeout, we're excited to share Quitxt to provide real-time help with motivation to quit, setting a quit date, handling stress, and much more, all on your phone," said Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of the ...

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Update: Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States


latino men doing arm bump wearing face masks for covid-19 coronavirus case prevention

The coronavirus COVID-19 can affect anyone. But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities. What are the data really showing? UPDATE 11/18/20: Various new data state and U.S. data! COVID-19 Case Rates for Latinos Coronavirus is disproportionately sickening U.S. Latinos. The U.S. COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate is 217.2 per 100,000, according to CDC data updated on Nov. 13, 2020. Hospitalization rates for Latinos are 4.2 times the rate among Whites. As of November 2020, the United States is experiencing record-highs for single-day new coronavirus cases. Latinos again face a heavier burden of cases. Here are some state examples of Latino coronavirus case disparities: Utah is 14% Latino. ...

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Honoring Latino Military Heroes on Veteran’s Day


Lt. Evita Salles, a Latino Military Personnel for Veteran's Day

Veteran's Day is on Nov. 11, 2020. We at Salud America! are excited to honor all U.S. military personnel, including the Latinos, who have served our country. Latinos in the Military: History Latinos have a “proud and indeed enviable” record of military service that dates back to the Civil War, according to a U.S. Army historical website. About 20,000 Latino serviceman and women participated in Operation Desert Shield/Storm in 1990-1991, 80,000 in the Vietnam War in 1959-1973, and more than 400,000 in World War II in 1939-1945. Latinos have received more than 40 Medals of Honor, according to the Department of Defense. “Whether their heritage can be traced to Spain, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, or one of dozens of other Spanish-speaking countries or cultures, they’ve ...

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USDA Extends Free School Meals for All Kids for 2020-2021 School Year


Latina girl drinks milk at cafeteria free school meals

By CDC Healthy Schools Guest Blogger for Salud America! Even though parents are used to juggling multiple roles and responsibilities, 2020 has brought on challenges. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has particularly impacted Latinos, many parents are helping their children with virtual learning while also balancing responsibilities at work and at home. If one of your new responsibilities is making sure your student is set up for success with breakfast and lunch, but you are stressed over buying groceries and making nutritious meals during the school day, there are solutions! The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is providing free school meals for all kids younger than 18 years during the entire 2020-2021 school year. USDA previously enabled free school meals ...

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How ‘Breast Friends Forever’ Support Group is Uplifting Young Breast Cancer Survivors


breast cancer survivors on podcast

Breast cancer affects different women differently. That's why the Breast Friends Forever (BFF) support group enables young breast cancer survivors to share their experiences in San Antonio, Texas (64% Latino). Recently, some BFF leaders joined the "Health Conversations with Anna Smith" Podcast. They talked about the need for the group and its origins in celebration of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. These include: Sandra L. San Miguel, BFF co-founder and program director at the National Cancer Institute; Brenda Garza, BFF co-founder and a survivor; Stanlie Murray, BFF executive director and a survivor; and Erica Ann De Zaiffe, BFF member and a survivor. Listen to the podcast Part 1 and Part 2. "BFF was a pioneer in those days, combining outreach and education activities with ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/27: How to Reduce Breast Cancer and Improve Survivorship among Latinas


breast cancer prevention latinas diverse women tweetchat

Breast cancer doesn’t impact every women the same. Among Latinas, breast cancer is the No. 1 cancer killer. Many Latinas face unique survivorship journeys, shaped by cultural and spiritual beliefs and struggles with barriers to care, screening, patient-doctor communication, and other social determinants of health. To recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October), let’s use #SaludTues on Oct. 27, 2020, to tweet about the latest progress in Latina breast cancer data and research, the importance of breast cancer screening, and tips and stories for prevention and survivorship! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “How to Reduce Breast Cancer and Improve Survivorship among Latinas” WHERE: Twitter WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020 HOST: Salud ...

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Tanya Enriquez DelValle: Keep Going, and Going, to Overcome Breast Cancer


Tanya Enriquez DelValle

By Tanya Enriquez DelValle Breast Cancer Survivor in San Antonio Five years after being diagnosed with breast cancer at age 27, I got my first tattoo…the energizer bunny with the pink ribbon on the drum. I was going to keep going and going. Here I am now 50 and still cancer free! I have an incredible life. I am a counselor at Legacy of Educational Excellence (LEE) High School, married to the man of my dreams for 15 years, and excited about the next adventure in my life. Twenty-three years ago, on Nov. 21, 1997, my world changed when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I remember asking my doctors if I was going to die. They said, "Not anytime soon." That was all I needed to hear. From that point forward I decided that cancer was NOT going to get the best of me. ...

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