Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States

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Coronavirus can affect anyone. But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities.

What are the data really showing?

UPDATE 6/30/20: Various new data state and U.S. data!

COVID-19 Case Rates Disparities for Latinos

Coronavirus is disproportionately sickening U.S. Latinos, The Guardian reports.

Latinos and black people together comprise 55% of coronavirus cases, nearly double their U.S. population makeup, according to CDC data released June 15, 2020. Overall, Latinos were 33% of COVID-19 cases and Blacks were 22% in an analysis of 1.3 million coronavirus cases reported to CDC during January 22-May 30, 2020.

That number has risen among Latinos, who now comprise 34.4% of coronavirus cases in the United States, according to CDC data on June 23, 2020. That is second-most, behind Whites (34.7%). On June 30, race/ethnic data was not available on the CDC website.

Here are some state examples of Latino coronavirus case disparities:

coronavirus covid symptoms usa today analysis 6-1-20Moreover, these data might not even show the full disparity.

In fact, one-third more Latino households than other households said someone in their home is experiencing coronavirus symptoms ranging from a dry cough to difficulty breathing, according to a June 1 analysis by USA Today of a marketing research company survey of 1.6 million people.

“Public health experts warn that the official statistics may be underestimating the virus’s toll on Latino communities wary of seeking medical care due to a lack of health insurance, and in many cases fear that going to a hospital will expose them to immigration authorities,” according to The Guardian.

COVID-19 Case Rates Disparities for Latinos, By Age

CDC is also tracking coronavirus case rate data by race/ethnicity and age.

As of June 23, 2020 (updated data not available on June 30):

Ages 0-17

  • Latinos: 52.4% coronavirus case rate
  • Blacks: 16.8%
  • Whites: 18.8%
  • Asians: 3.2%

Ages 18-44

  • Latinos: 43.3% coronavirus case rate
  • Blacks: 20.2%
  • Whites: 26.7%
  • Asians: 3.9%

Ages 45-64

  • Latinos: 33.3% coronavirus case rate
  • Blacks: 23.3%
  • Whites: 33.4%
  • Asians: 4%

Ages 65-74

  • Latinos: 19.9% coronavirus case rate
  • Blacks: 25.3%
  • Whites: 45.1%
  • Asians: 3.7%

Ages 75+

  • Latinos: 12.3% coronavirus case rate
  • Blacks: 18.1%
  • Whites: 61%
  • Asians: 3.1%

COVID-19 Death Rates for Latinos

The U.S. population is 18.3% Latino right now.

The CDC shared racial/ethnic data on provisional death counts for COVID-19 on June 24, 2020. They update this data once a week.

16.6% of U.S. COVID-19 deaths are among Latinos.

Economic Fallout LatinosHowever, the Latino death rate became a more out-sized 27.7% when CDC used weighted population distributions. This is higher than the 26.7% mark from data at the end of May 2020.

“The weighted population distributions ensure that the population estimates and percentages of COVID-19 deaths represent comparable geographic areas, in order to provide information about whether certain racial and ethnic subgroups are experiencing a disproportionate burden of COVID-19 mortality,” CDC wrote.

CDC also warns this data may be incomplete.

It doesn’t include all deaths that occurred during a given time period, given a one-to-two-week lag.

COVID-19 Death Rates for Latinos by State

CDC also had data on state distribution of COVID-19 deaths, as of June 24, 2020.

Again, they included unweighted and weighted population distributions to add context for geographical outbreaks.

Alabama (4.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 3.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Arizona (31.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 23.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 31.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Arkansas (7.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 5.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 8.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

California (39.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 41.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 47.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Colorado (21.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 23.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 24% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Connecticut (16.5% of total state population is Latino)

  • 9.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 18.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Delaware (9.5% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 9.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

D.C. (11.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 12.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

rural latino hispanic farm worker health care coronavirus covid-19Florida (26.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 25.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 46.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Georgia (9.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 10.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Illinois (17.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 21.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 25.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Indiana (7.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 10.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Iowa (6.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 7.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Kansas (12.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 14.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Kentucky (3.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Louisiana (5.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 8.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Maine (1.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • N/A% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 2.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Maryland (10.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 10.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 14.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Massachusetts (12.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 6.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 12.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Michigan (5.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Minnesota (5.5% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 6.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Mississippi (3.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 2.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Missouri (4.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 3.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Nebraska (11.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 22.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 12.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Nevada (29% of total state population is Latino)

  • 21.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 31.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New Hampshire (3.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • N/A% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 6.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New Jersey (20.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 20.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 22.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New Mexico (49.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 13.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 45.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New York (11.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 15.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 18.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

North Carolina (9.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Ohio (3.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Oklahoma (10.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 14.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Oregon (13.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 12.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Pennsylvania (7.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 5.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Rhode Island (15.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 6.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 22.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

South Carolina (5.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • N/A% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 6.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Tennessee (5.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 7.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Texas (39.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 34.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 41.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Utah (14.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 25.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 18.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Virginia (9.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 10.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 15.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Washington (12.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 11.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 10.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Wisconsin (6.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 10.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

That means 37 of 41 reporting states and D.C. have an over-representation of Latino deaths, according to the weighted CDC data.

COVID-19 Case and Death Data in 5 U.S. Cities with Largest Latino Populations

Not much, if any, city race/ethnicity data is weighted geographically to highlight disparities amid large outbreaks.

Here is a look at the most Latino cities.

1. New York City

29.1% of the total population is Latino.

Latinos have the largest number of confirmed deaths due to COVID-19.

COVID-19 Confirmed Deaths

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 5,451
  • Blacks: 4,900
  • Whites: 4,448
  • Asians: 1,347

COVID-19 Case Rates (per 100,000 population)

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 1,497 per 100,000 population
  • Blacks: 1,587 per 100,000 population
  • Whites: 988 per 100,000 population
  • Asians: 598 per 100,000 population

Source: NYC Health, accessed 6/24/20. Race/ethnicity information is often missing because it is not on the test requisitions from providers.

2. Los Angeles County (Home of Los Angeles)

48.6% of the total population is Latino.

42% of COVID-19 deaths are Latino.

Latino hispanic man coughing sick health care ACACOVID-19 Deaths

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 42%
  • Blacks: 11%
  • Whites: 28%
  • Asians: 17%

Source: County of Los Angeles Public Health, 6/23/20.

3. City of Houston

44.8% of the total population is Latino.

More than half of cases are among Latinos.

As of June 23, 2020, here are the number of COVID-19 cases:

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 7,500
  • Blacks: 3,400
  • Whites: 3,400
  • Asians: 595

Houston lists cases by race/ethnicity on their coronavirus dashboard. They do not post death data by race/ethnicity.

4. Bexar County (Home of San Antonio)

60% of the total population is Latino.

72.9% of COVID-19 cases are Latino.

Also, between June 2 and June 25, 79.8% of COVID-19 local cases are Latino, according to local epidemiologists.

COVID-19 Cases

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 72.9%
  • Blacks: 7%
  • Whites: 18%
  • Asians: 1.7%

Source: San Antonio Metro Health Surveillance Dashboard, 6/30/20.

5. City of Chicago

29% of the total population is Latino.

31.5% of COVID-19 deaths are Latino. 47.7% of COVID-19 cases are Latino.

COVID-19 Deaths

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 31.5%
  • Blacks: 43.8%
  • Whites: 19.1%
  • Asians: 4.7%

COVID-19 Cases

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 47.7%
  • Blacks: 29.6%
  • Whites: 14.4%
  • Asians: 2.8%

Source: Chicago.gov, 6/23/20.

San Francisco’s Big Coronavirus Testing Blitz Reveals Wide Disparities

Dr. Diane Havlir, of the University of California, San Francisco, galvanized community support and tested over 3,000 adults and children for coronavirus, including the Mission District, one of the city’s largest Latino neighborhoods.

The results left her spellbound.

“While Havlir expected to see the Latinx community hit hard by the virus, the actual numbers came as a shock. About 2% of people tested positive for the coronavirus. Nearly all of them — 95% — were Latinx,” according to statnews.com. “The other 5% were Asian or Pacific Islander. Not a single white person tested positive, though 34% of the tract’s residents are white, according to the U.S. Census; 58% are Hispanic.”

Coronavirus covid-19 SF casesThe data also found that most of those who tested positive (82%) reported having been financially affected by economic fallout of the pandemic.

Only 10% reported being able to work from home.

“The virus exploits pre-existing vulnerabilities in our society,” Havlir said in a statement. “We have already seen that 84 percent of people coming into [Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center] for treatment for COVID-19 are Latinx, and our community-based screening study emphasizes how high infection risk continues to be for this population. Hopefully, with this data we can respond and start putting resources to work towards more equity in supporting this highly impacted community.”

What Does All This Coronavirus Case and Death Data Really Mean?

It means Latino face a heavy burden of coronavirus.

Latinos are highly exposed to the virus as essential workers.

Also, this population suffers from inequities in income, health care access, access to food, and more. Poverty rates also play a large role, as do fears of impact on daily life.

Latino undocumented immigrants often don’t benefit from unemployment aid or stimulus checks, either.

But we can overcome our biases.

We also need policies to address social support for Latinos in poverty, such as these 10 strategies.

“Capable and healthy adults are the foundation of any well-functioning society,” said Greg Duncan of University of California, Irvine, in a news release. “But because millions of American children are in families living below the poverty line, this future is not as secure as it could be.”

What Can You Do?

Here are 19 ways to push for health equity amid coronavirus.

You can also get a “Health Equity Report Card” for your area!

Health Equity Report Card - 1Select your county name and get a customized Health Equity Report Card by Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio. You will see how your area stacks up in housing, transit, poverty, health care, healthy food, and other health equity issues compared to the rest of your state and nation.

You can email your Health Equity Report Card, share it on social media, and use it to make the case for community change to boost health equity.

Get your health equity Report Card!

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28

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of Latino kids suffer four or more adverse childhood experiences (ACES).

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