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The Sad Reason More Latino Kids Don’t Participate in School Sports, Activities



Nearly 21% of Latino parents said their middle- and high-school children would not participate in any school activities in 2018-19, a higher rate than parents overall (18%), according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan. These kids miss the boost in educational achievement and personal development that stem from school extracurricular activities, from sports to student council. So why aren't more kids participating? The Biggest Reason: Cost Most middle- and high-schoolers will participate in at least one school activity in 2018-19. This includes 52% in sports, 43% in arts, and 51% in clubs/other, according to the poll. But cost is the biggest reason keeping other kids from participating. Many school ...

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Latinos Breathe More Unclean Air Because of White Consumption


unclean air pollution

It is a proven fact that people of color inhale more hazardous pollution than whites. Worse, the consumption of products that cause unclean air is coming from the community least affected by this kind of pollution — whites, according to recent research. Latinos, the group most impacted, will breathe 63% more contaminated air than what their consumption produces. “Even though minorities are contributing less to the overall problem of air pollution, they are affected by it more,” Jason Hill,  study co-author, University of Minnesota engineering professor, and who is also white, told USA Today. “Is it fair [that] I create more pollution, and somebody else is disproportionately affected by it?” Air quality detrimentally affects Latinos in childhood diabetes, lung ...

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5 Pediatrician-Approved Policies to Limit Kids’ Sugary Drinks (Including Soda Taxes)


Latino toddler kid with sugury drink obesity

In a joint policy statement today, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Heart Association (AHA) endorsed five public health measures—including excise taxes—to reduce kids’ consumption of sugary drinks. The statement appears in the April 2019 issue of Pediatrics. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that children and teens consume fewer than 10% of calories from added sugars. But data show that they now consume 17% of their calories from added sugars—half of which come from sports drinks, fruit-flavored drinks and sodas. Latino children consume more sugary drinks than their peers. "On average, children are consuming over 30 gallons of sugary drinks every year. This is enough to fill a bathtub, and it doesn’t even include added sugars ...

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Racial Bias Still Infects the Doctor’s Office


doctor bias

In medical school, physicians are trained to exclude their own personal upbringings, and that of their patients, from clinical decisions. That doesn't always happen in reality. In fact, doctors are often susceptible to their unconscious bias, research shows. Unconscious bias, also known as "implicit bias," happens when automatic processing is influenced by stereotypes. These stereotypes then impact your actions and judgments. Doctors & Implicit Bias Many studies have shown that physicians—especially white physicians—have implicit preferences for white patients. Implicit bias can lead to false assumptions and adverse health outcomes. For example: Implicit bias is a major reason why Latino men are much less likely to receive optimal treatment for high-risk ...

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As Trump Vows to End to HIV, Epidemic Continues Huge Rise among Latinos


latino hispanic young man adult writing

Just weeks after President Donald Trump unveiled a plan to end the HIV epidemic by 2030, a CDC report showed a rising trend in HIV cases among Latinos. Overall, the U.S. HIV rate declined by 6% from 2010-2016, according to the CDC. But the Latino HIV rate rose 14% over the same span. The disparity is even more stark among Latino gay and bisexual men, who suffered a 30% rise in HIV cases. The rate actually fell 16% among white gay and bisexual men. "This CDC report shows an alarming trend that is urgent to address," said Guillermo Chacon, of the Latino Commission on AIDS, in an email. "The messenger matters and in this case customized prevention strategies by population matters even more. It is critical to re-set and review the prevention and engagement efforts to reverse this ...

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Steady Housing Now a Big Factor in County Health Rankings


bus nieghborhood housing los angeles california suburb

Education. Access to medical care. Healthy food and safe places to play. Even housing. All these influence your health. That’s why annually, since 2010, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has released its County Health Rankings so each state can see how its counties compare on more than 30 factors that impact health, income, education, transportation, jobs, and more. The rankings help us understand what is making people sick or healthy, and what we can do to create healthier places to live, learn, work, and play. This year’s rankings took a deep dive into a new area: housing and health. Housing Ownership in Largely Latino Counties Owning a home can, over time, help build savings for education or for other opportunities important to health and future family ...

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Talc-Based, Potentially Cancerous Baby Powder Just Lost Johnson & Johnson $29 Million


Baby powder asbestos

A lawsuit that claims manufacturing giant Johnson & Johnson’s powder products cause cancer resulted in the company facing a multimillion-dollar payout. The verdict, reached last week in Almeda County, California (22.5% Latino), was filed by Teresa Leavitt, who was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a cancer of tissue lining, in August 2017. Johnson & Johnson has known about and covered up potential dangers in their talc-based products since the 1970s, according to the New York Times. The company, however, disputes these claims. Talc-Based Products and Latinos In the 1990s, Johnson & Johnson executed a national marketing campaign that targeted Latino and African-American women in Baby Powder advertising. “Johnson’s Baby Powder has a high usage rate among African ...

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The Eye-Popping Surge of Latino-Serving Colleges, Universities


Latino Hispanic college student studying in a university library

The number of Latino or Hispanic-serving colleges and universities has risen 98% in the past 10 years, from 264 in 2007 to 523 in 2018, according to a new report by Excelencia in Education. A “Hispanic-Serving Institution” (HSI) has 25% or more undergraduate full-time equivalent Latino enrollment. HSIs now constitute 17% of all colleges and universities. The Key Data Two of three Latino undergraduates attend an HSI. 46% of student enrollment at HSIs is Latino. HSIs are present in 27 states and Puerto Rico. That's up from 21 last year. HSIs are very concentrated geographically. 69% were located in three states and Puerto Rico. California has the most, followed by Texas and New York. Most HSIs are located in a city (273) or suburb (163). Fewer were in towns ...

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Disturbing Report Estimates Impact of SNAP Cuts


SNAP, food stamps

We already know that nearly a million SNAP participants could be affected by the Trump Administration’s proposed rule to tighten SNAP work requirements. However, there’s more bad news. The vast majority of those potentially impacted reside in deep poverty and live alone, according to a new analysis released by Mathematica, which is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “No one in America should go hungry or live in poverty,” said Giridhar Mallya, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, in a press release. “The findings of this analysis show that USDA’s proposed rule would disproportionately affect some of the most vulnerable SNAP participants. USDA should carefully consider whether this change promotes the ultimate goal of the SNAP ...

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