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Reports: People of Color are More Likely to Die from Coronavirus


People of Color More Likely Die Coronavirus

Systemic, health inequities impacting disadvantaged groups are rampant in America and they're causing those individuals to suffer worse, even fatal, COVID-19 outcomes. Early reports suggested that those disparities would play a role in the current coronavirus spread, making minority groups, including Latinos, more likely to suffer severe harm. Now, weeks into the American pandemic, early reports from hotbed areas—such as Oregon and New York City—are proving that prediction true. "There are clear inequalities, clear disparities in how this disease is affecting the people of our city," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio told the New York Times. "So many people struggle to get the healthcare they need, who didn't have the money to afford the healthcare they deserved. So many ...

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Are Latinos More Exposed to Coronavirus? Left Out of Testing, Treatment, Social Distancing?


latino man with child amid coronavirus covid-19 fears via AP Photo

COVID-19 can affect anyone. But, in reality, it's worsening the health and social inequities facing U.S. Latinos. Now the pandemic is raising fears of racial/ethnic and income disparities in coronavirus exposure, testing, prevention via social distancing, and treatment. "As the number of cases rises, citizens are rightfully concerned about who is getting tested and who will receive treatment," writes health equity adviser Brian Williams in a column for the Dallas Morning News. "For those who exist on the margins of health care justice, access to life-saving treatment is never guaranteed." Disparities in Coronavirus Exposure We know Latinos are more likely than their white peers to suffer from poverty, underlying conditions, and a lack of quality housing and transit. They also ...

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What Coronavirus Means for You, If You Have Heart Disease


senior Latino man suffering from bad pain in his chest cardiac arrest CPR heart coronavirus

Experts say people who have underlying health conditions should guard against COVID-19. In fact, CDC now says that U.S. adults with diabetes, chronic lung disease, and heart disease are at higher risk for severe COVID-19-associated disease than people without these conditions. Latinos face a heavier burden for several of these conditions. The American Heart Association even warned elderly people with heart disease or hypertension. "Based on current information, it appears elderly people with coronary heart disease or hypertension are more likely to be infected and to develop more severe symptoms," according to AHA. "Stroke survivors may also face increased risk for complications if they get COVID-19" According to the latest report from  State Department of Health, out of the ...

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Latinos: COVID-19 Disrupts Finances, Daily Life, Mental Health


latinos-say-covid-19-disrupts-finances-daily-life-mental-health

COVID-19 doesn't discriminate. But U.S. Latinos are more likely than all Americans to say the coronavirus pandemic changed their daily lives, and disrupts their mental health, finances, and jobs, according to new Pew Research Center surveys. "Latinos make up significant portions of the hospitality, construction, leisure and agricultural sectors of our labor market, and are the largest uninsured population in America," wrote Kristian Ramos, ex-spokesman for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, for The Hill. "These workers and uninsured families are unable to telecommute, will not be paid if their jobs are lost, and likely do not have immediate access to health care." Latino Daily Life During COVID-19 Early on in the outbreak, Pew Research Center reported that a higher percentage of ...

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Coronavirus Is Hitting People in Poverty the Hardest


Coronavirus Poverty Hardest

Lack of access to healthy food, insufficient health insurance coverage, living paycheck-to-paycheck — all issues that have impacted U.S. low-income families for decades. Sadly, experts say these problems are worsening as the current novel coronavirus, COVID-19, continues to spread. This leaves the millions of men, women, and children, including the 3 million people who have recently lost their jobs, at risk of more issues than just becoming sick. Latinos—many of whom fall below the poverty line—could face significant hardship without a dedicated response from local, state, and federal leaders. "What we are seeing around the country is that we're operating and telling people to do things from the position of wealth," Rev. William Barber II, co-chair of the Poor People's ...

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Walking and Biking Are Way Up During COVID-19, Revealing Big Inequities in Open Spaces


Walking and Biking Are Way Up During COVID-19

With schools and retail stores closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19, more people are going outside to walk and bike in communities across the country. Philadelphia and New York are closing some streets to cars and open them to people walking and biking. This gives people room to practice six-foot social distancing rules as they pick up groceries, get physical activity, and grab some fresh air amid the coronavirus lockdown. But some cities and states are closing parks amid virus fears. This worsens existing inequities in access to green and open spaces for Latinos and other disadvantaged communities. Equitable access to green and open spaces is more important than ever. Outdoor Recreation is Surging during Coronavirus Social media is abuzz about the spike in people outside ...

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Reports: Latino Workers Are Hit Hardest by COVID-19 Pandemic


latino workers hit hard by covid-19 coronavirus food service

Coronavirus can affect anyone. But experts warn that COVID-19 will cause more suffering among U.S. Black and Latino workers, due to societal inequities shaped by structural racism and low-paying jobs with no chance of telework. "When the COVID-19 pandemic has ended in this country, we will see an unequal distribution of infections and deaths along the intersecting lines of race and class," wrote labor historian Christopher Hayes in the New Jersey Star-Ledger. UPDATE 4/23/20: 26 million people have filed jobless claims in the past five weeks, NBC News reports. Why is this? Coronavirus Compounded: Income Inequities among Latino Workers These statistics show a glimpse of how much Latino workers earn: 1 in 3 Latinos live in poverty. 1 in 2 Latino families are ...

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Coronavirus and its Impacts on the Affordable Housing Crisis



The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting health equity in many ways, including homelessness, evictions, and affordable housing options. Low-income workers, the uninsured, those with unstable housing, and immigrant communities will bear the brunt of this crisis. Many U.S. cities were dealing with a homelessness crisis long before this outbreak. Now, the escalating pandemic has created a catastrophe threatening thousands of lives. Affordable Housing Crisis during COVID-19 Millions of Americans face housing cost burdens. Over half a million sleep on the streets any given night, according to a recent report. Worse, countless people and families pay more than they can afford to keep a roof over their heads every month. The coronavirus outbreak is a public health emergency that will ...

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Does Pollution and Poor Air Quality Raise the Risk of Coronavirus?


Pollution Poor Air Quality Risk Coronavirus

As the current novel coronavirus continues to spread, one fact has become clear: Governments around the globe were not prepared — especially concerning environmental impacts. While there is no direct link between pollution and the risk of developing COVID-19, yet, studies have shown that poor air quality can raise one's susceptibility to disease. Worse, high rates of toxic exposure can lead to poorer outcomes of those illnesses. Disadvantaged groups, including Latinos, are in greater jeopardy as they are the ones who live in the areas with more significant amounts of air pollution. "There's lots of evidence that air pollution increases the chances that someone will get pneumonia, and if they get pneumonia, will be sicker with it," Aaron Bernstein, interim director of the ...

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