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As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, People of Color Face Uncertain Path


COVID-19 Vaccine People Color Uncertain

Many people are longing for an end to the turbulent COVID-19 pandemic. Thankfully, healthcare and government leaders are focusing their efforts and funding to develop a vaccine to halt transmission of the virus that has killed over 140,000 people in the U.S. A COVID-19 vaccine is a worthy goal, but leaders also must address one sad fact before any treatment is made available — the widespread disparity found among the racial makeup of those who are immunized and those who are not. "It's racial inequality — inequality in housing, inequality in employment, inequality in access to health care — that produced the underlying diseases," Dr. Dayna Bowen Matthew, dean of the George Washington University Law School—who has spent her career focusing on racial disparities in medical ...

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Health Experts: Spanish Speakers at Elevated Risk for COVID-19


coronavirus job loss stress latino families surveys

U.S. Latinos are bearing an extraordinary burden of COVID-19 cases and deaths. Why is this? Health experts are trying to find an answer. They say the pandemic is worsening historical health and social inequities among Latinos and other people of color, affecting people of a certain age, and those who have diabetes, obesity, and cancer, as well as those who smoke. Now a study points to a new, but common, culprit: language barriers (and the healthcare system's failure to accommodate people who don't speak English). Latinos Face Language Barriers During COVID-19 Pandemic Language is a common barrier to health care. That's why Spanish translation is important in education, providing medical care, bullying prevention, healthcare access, and even podcasting. When it comes to ...

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Study: Chest X-rays Show Severe COVID-19 Cases in Latino Patients


Chest X-rays Severe COVID-19 Latino Patients

The coronavirus pandemic has had a devastating impact on people of color. Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, one fact has been proven correct time and again: Minority groups face a higher risk of infection and the many burdens associated. This fact has been proven in a recent study from Massachusetts General Hospital. "Radiologists from saw these disparities firsthand in April among patients admitted to the hospital with confirmed COVID-19 infection, and at one of the hospital's respiratory infection clinics in Chelsea, a city just north of Boston that is home to a predominantly Spanish-speaking Hispanic community," the researchers write. "A significant proportion of the patients who visited the Chelsea clinic had COVID-19, and the level of disease the ...

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Without Safeguards, SNAP Online Food Purchases Could Threaten Participants’ Privacy, Undermine their Health


SNAP Online Food Purchasing Program

Before COVID-19, families with SNAP federal food aid could not use their electronic benefits transfer (EBT) cards to buy groceries online. They had to go to into stores and risk infection. The good news is 37 states now have a SNAP online food purchasing programs. The bad news is that those online purchasing programs could “expose [SNAP] participants to increased data collection and surveillance, a flood of intrusive and manipulative online marketing techniques, and pervasive promotion of unhealthy foods,” according to the Center for Digital Democracy. The Center’s new report explains how federal and state policies fail to protect consumers against unhealthy food marketing, threatening the health of SNAP families. The report also recommends regulatory safeguards, industry ...

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Mimi Frazier White: If We Fight Together, We Will Win Against Breast Cancer


Mimi Frazier White collage

By Harmenia "Mimi" Frazier White Breast Cancer Survivor My journey began in 2015 when I was diagnosed with stage 3b invasive breast cancer. For years prior to the diagnosis, I was misdiagnosed and told that I had fibrocystic breast disease. If I didn't finally want to know what was going on with my body, I wouldn't be here today. Once I was diagnosed, I went into chemotherapy for 5 months and got married right after I finished. In July 2016 I got a double mastectomy and lymph node removal next, followed by 3 months of radiation. The next year, I had to get a salpingo oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes). At this point, cancer had taken nearly everything from me. Luckily, it didn't take my spirit or my strong will to live. I fought hard to maintain this ...

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Cities Need to Drastically Scale Up Contact Tracing to Slow Coronavirus Spread


Cities Need to Drastically Scale Up Contact Tracing to Slow Coronavirus Spread

For months now, health leaders have asked Americans to flatten the COVID-19 curve by behaving as if they have been exposed─stay home, stop hanging out with friends and family, avoid public places like gyms and bars, and wear a mask when around others. This individual behavior is needed to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. But, at the same time, public health departments must do their part, too. They are responsible for “contact tracing”─contacting people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and those in close contact with them to give them critical information to slow disease spread: understand the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they themselves do not feel ill; understand what they should do to monitor themselves for ...

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U.S. Latinos Reach Record-High 18.5% of Nation’s Population


U.S. Latinos are a rising population group

The U.S. Latino population grew to 60.6 million in 2019, a record 18.5% of the total population, according to new Census Bureau data. Here are all the details you need to know. The U.S. Latino Population Continues to Grow The U.S. population reached 328,239,523 in 2019. Latinos reached 60,572,237 in 2019. Now at 18.5% of the U.S. population, Latinos are the second-largest racial/ethnic group, behind non-Latino Whites (60.1%). They have greater numbers than Blacks (13.4), Asians (5.9%), and American Indians or Alaska Natives (1.3%). Latinos accounted for 16% of the U.S. population in 2010. In fact, the U.S. Latino population is up by 10,093,626 from 2010 to 2019, or 20% growth, according to the new Census Bureau data. Growth of the U.S. Latino Population Is Slowing Even ...

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Why You Should Answer Calls from Your Health Department about COVID-19


Why You Should Answer Calls From Your Health Department

Have you or someone close to you tested positive for COVID-19? You should have gotten a phone call from a local public health worker─a “case investigator” or “contact tracer”─who would give guidance on monitoring symptoms, quarantining to prevent spread, and more. But some cities don’t have enough people to make these important calls. Also, some people don’t answer or return phone calls from unknown numbers and may be uncomfortable answering questions. That is why, to reduce the spread of COVID-19, cities must invest in extensive contact tracing efforts and encourage the public to answer or return phone calls from the health department. “Case investigation and contact tracing, a core disease control measure employed by local and state health department ...

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