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Study: Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Children to the Hospital


Secondhand Smoke Sending Children Hospital

Exposure to the fumes from harmful tobacco products, such as cigarettes and cigars, can severely affect people, especially in children. Recent research shows that children who live with a smoker are more likely to become hospitalized than their peers living in smoke-free households. According to Dr. Ashley Merianos, an associate professor in the School of Human Services at the University of Cincinnati, this data does not come as a complete surprise. "In past studies, we found up to nearly one-in-two children who come to the pediatric emergency department are exposed to tobacco smoke," Merianos told The Denver Channel. "We also found that the children who had been exposed had increased respiratory-related procedures, increased diagnostic testing. So, for example, being tested for ...

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What Are COVID-19 Long Haulers and Are Latinos at Risk?


COVID-19 ‘Long Haulers’ Latinos Long-Term Risk

Not all COVID-19 experiences are equal. For some, the illness’s side effects can last for weeks or even months. This group of severely affected individuals, referred to as “long haulers” by experts, is experiencing infection and lasting consequences. These maladies include shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue, and other symptoms. While there is only a general understanding of those who deal with prolonged coronavirus side-effects, there is enough data to see there is a problem, according to officials. “Anecdotally, there’s no question that there are a considerable number of individuals who have a postviral syndrome that really, in many respects, can incapacitate them for weeks and weeks following so-called recovery and clearing of the virus,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, ...

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Study: Latino LGBTQ Youth at High Risk for Suicide


Latino LGBTQ Suicide

Latino LGBTQ youth are 30% more likely to attempt suicide than non-Latino LGBTQ youth, according to a new study by the Trevor Project, a non-profit focused on suicide prevention for LGBTQ youth. Part of the reason is the stress-related stigma, discrimination, and difficulties expressing gender and sexual identity, which many LGBTQ people of color face. But, unfortunately, Latino LGBTQ youth also often deal with the stress of immigration, which can take a heavy toll on a person’s mental health. “The higher risk of attempting suicide among Latinx LGBTQ youth compared to non-Latinx LGBTQ youth can be explained by greater worries about themselves or family being detained or deported due to immigration policies,” according to the Trevor Project. LGBTQ and Mental Health Members ...

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Let’s ‘Anchor It’ to Protect Kids from Deadly Tip-Overs



Many families are staying home more than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But only about 80% of parents realize that furniture tip-overs can lead to injuries and death among children. Only about half have safety anchored a TV or furniture at home, according to a recent survey by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which created the Anchor It! safety campaign. Parents who did not anchor said they didn't think it was needed, as long as they were watching the kids. That's why Anchor It! has a new English and Spanish video, "Even When You're Watching," to help parents understand the dangers of furniture tip-overs. "[The video] contains real-life footage that vividly demonstrates just how quickly a tip-over can happen, even when parents are in the same room watching ...

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How Cities are Using Community-Based Workers for Effective Contact Tracing


Community-Based Workforce

As we continue the battle against COVID-19, public health authorities are urging cities to increase their contact tracing efforts. “Contact tracing is key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and helps protect you, your family, and your community,” according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. But identifying people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and tracking their whereabouts and potential infection sources has its challenges. People may be skeptical to release information to contact tracers calling on the phone if they’re wary of scams. And because COVID-19 disproportionately affects Latino and other minority communities, there may be a language barrier or sense of fear when discussing health information with state employees. What can be done to face ...

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Why a Large Scale Alzheimer’s Study is Critical for Latinos


Large Scale Alzheimer Study Latinos

Among the countless disparities Latinos face, the way in which people's brains age might differ based on their race. That is what researchers at University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth will study after reciving increased funding for large-scale Alzheimer's biomarker study from the National Institute of Health (NIH). Mainly, they will be looking into health gaps in brains aging between Mexican Americans compared to their white peers. "To successfully battle and ultimately prevent or treat a complex disease such as Alzheimer's, we need to understand how this disease and other forms of dementia affect our nation's diverse communities differently," Dr. Eliezer Masliah, director of the NIA Division of Neuroscience, said in a press release. This award was made ...

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Texas’ Digital Divide and its Impact Latino Students


Texas Digital Divide Latino Students

Children across the Lone Star State have returned to school — still, some learners are adjusting to the new way of learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic better than others. As educators rely on web-based teaching more each day, the students who lack sufficient internet access face significant hardship. In Texas, 1.8 million K-12 public school students, many of whom come from disadvantaged groups, including Latinos, find themselves among those struggling to learn. “Families that are suffering from the digital divide are dealing with a lot,” Carlotta Garcia, a Central Texas Interfaith organizer, told The Texas Observer. “These are families dealing with life and death. Right now, they’re dealing with food, medicine, sickness, and the threat of displacement.” Lack of ...

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Report: ICE Allegedly Gives Detained Immigrants Hysterectomies Without Full Consent


ICE Detained Immigrants Hysterectomies

Among the horrific forms of treatment undocumented individuals face, a new report claims that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) performs hysterectomies on immigrant women. The shocking details, obtained through a complaint filed by Project South, assert that a gynecologist at the Irwin County Detention Center (ICDC) in Georgia performed these procedures — without providing a full understanding of the operation. Sometimes, they didn't even give these details in their native language, according to the report. Dawn Wooten, a former nurse at the detention center and the whistleblower of this complaint provided insight into the alleged practice. "Everybody [that the accused gynecologist] sees has a hysterectomy — just about everybody," Wooten said in the complaint. ...

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The Rise of Implicit Bias Training


Implicit Bias Training

Bias. We see it in the media every day. We see how police officers disproportionately target people of color. We see how COVID-19 affects Latino and Black people more than white people, which has brought racial disparities in healthcare to light. How do we address this bias? Many states are turning to mandatory implicit bias training for state employees. What is implicit bias? Implicit bias is defined as preconceived notions, or stereotypes, that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions about others—at a level beyond our conscious control, according to a Salud America! research review. This kind of bias happens when stereotypes influence your brain processing. Stereotypes like these then influence your actions and judgments: A widely held, simplified, and ...

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