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Get Moving with a Free Child Physical Activity Program You Can Do from Home!



Many Latino children have pressing mental health needs but are not getting adequate mental health care, studies have shown.  COVID-19 didn’t help, either.  The pandemic heightened social isolation, dependence on smartphones and social media, and mental health issues among young people.   Meanwhile, opportunities declined for physical activity – a proven method for treating disorders such as depression and anxiety.  Loss of physical activity can harm physical, emotional, social, and mental health.  This is why a PhD student at Michigan State University is offering a free online program geared to increasing physical activity to improve mental health in Latino children between the ages of 7 and 11.  About the Physical Activity Program  The program is part of a ...

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For Your Familia: Understanding Low Grade Glioma



U.S. Army soldier Tony Rentas, a native of Puerto Rico who dreamed of serving in the military all his life, had a seizure while on a mission in Kosovo. Tony was diagnosed with a low grade glioma, a rare type of brain tumor. He had no idea what a low grade glioma was. So, he started Googling. He found little that helped him understand this diagnosis and what it meant for him and his familia, and even less was available in Spanish. That is why Tony is sharing his story and participating in the International Low Grade Glioma Registry, which hopes to learn more about the best ways to treat these tumors across different groups of people, including members of the Hispanic/Latino community. “One of the biggest things that I wanted to do is help people as much as I can,” Tony ...

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How Do We Know if Complete Streets (or Any Streets) Are Meeting the Needs of Community Members?


How Do We Know if Complete Streets (or Any Streets) Are Meeting the Needs of Community Members?

We know little about which transportation investments or initiatives are reducing transportation barriers and meeting people’s transportation needs. For example, are Complete Streets policies meeting the needs of community members? As Smart Growth America releases its best practices to evaluate the success of Complete Streets efforts, we at Salud America! want to draw attention to how transportation needs and barriers have been conceptualized. Across the fields of urban planning, public health, and health care are claims about how transportation impacts health and quality of life. However, regarding these impacts, transportation is often conceptualized only in terms of physical activity, pollution, safety, and/or access to medical care. Although transportation is often ...

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7 Reasons to Do SDoH Screening in Healthcare


sdoh screening patient doctor latino woman pregnant baby

Where you live can have a big impact on your health. Non-medical factors like where we are born, live, work, and age — known as social determinants of health (SDoH) — can influence health for better or worse. However, the U.S. has struggled to identify and help people with SDoH issues. That's where SDoH screening comes in. SDoH screening is a questionnaire given to patients in a healthcare setting to help providers identify non-medical barriers to health. These include issues like financial hardship, transportation, housing, food, employment, and safety. Patients can then be referred to helpful community resources. Here are seven reasons to implement SDoH screening in your healthcare system, hospital, or clinic. 1. SDoH Screening Helps Patients Speak Up SDoH ...

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Healthy Vision Month: Reframe Your Future



This Healthy Vision Month in May, the National Eye Institute (NEI) is looking through a futuristic lens to bring awareness to eye health and share English and Spanish-language resources to protect the sight of your familia. Eye health and mental health go hand in hand, especially for some Latinos who lack access to eye care. “Reframe Your Future, aims to reach people with a visual impairment about steps they can take to thrive in their daily life, like seeking vision rehabilitation and mental health services,” according to an NEI news release. Here is what you should know about taking care of eye health for you and your family. What is Low Vision? Low vision impairs your ability to see. It makes it difficult to do day-to-day activities such as reading, driving, or see a screen ...

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7 Things You Should Know About Brain Tumors



Did you know about 90,000 people are diagnosed with a primary brain tumor every year? Similarly, over 1.3 million people in the United States are living with a primary or secondary/metastatic brain tumor. For ourselves, our familia, and our comunidad, we should know a few important things about brain tumors so we can help all those impacted by a tumor diagnosis. Thankfully, the American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA) has amazing resources to help. Let’s explore and learn! 1. Know the Types of Brain Tumors A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells that have formed in the brain. But not all brain tumors are the same. “Some brain tumors are malignant (cancerous), while others are not (non-malignant, non-cancerous or benign). A brain tumor can form in the brain or ...

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How Healthcare Professionals Can Help Address Climate Change Health Effects



The summer of 2023 was one of the hottest seasons on record for some areas across the US, bringing sweltering temperatures that caused heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Experts see this as a prime example climate change endangering health. While extreme weather events like heat are nothing new, the frequency of these events is cause for concern, especially when it comes to health and well-being. To tackle some of these issues, the World Health Organization (WHO) has launched a new toolkit to help healthcare professionals arm themselves with knowledge about climate change and health. Communicating on climate change and health toolkit for health professionals discusses the ways to start difficult conversations about climate change with patients, other providers, and officials, and find ...

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Houston’s Latino Children Struggle with Diabetes, Health Challenges



Nearly one of every two people are Latino in Harris County, Texas, which is home to Houston, the nation’s fourth-largest city. As the Latino community rises, equitable health, education, and opportunity is critical. That is why two Houston organizations, Children at Risk and Child Health Policy at the Baker Institute, published the 2024 Latino Child Health Initiative Report to examine the state of Latino child health in Precinct 2, one of four precincts in Harris County. The report identified high rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity among Latino children in Houston, as well as barriers to mental health services and kindergarten readiness. Let’s dive into the report and how it reflects the overall US Latino population. Latino Children and Risk for Diabetes, Obesity In ...

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Latinos: Share Your Cancer Journey or Caregiver Experience 



Researchers at Texas Tech University are interested in learning more about you and your family caregiver's experience with cancer. The research team is seeking participation from people who are 18 or older, speak English, identify as Latino or non-Hispanic White, and have been diagnosed with any form of cancer at any stage. Caregivers who want to participate must be 18 years or older, speak English, and identify as Latino or non-Hispanic White.  If you or your loved one meets these qualifications, you may be eligible to take part in this study, which consists of three different surveys.  These surveys will be spaced out and take 30 to 45 minutes to complete, and can be done online, by mail, or over the phone with the help of a research assistant.  The first will be given ...

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