Read More Resource Articles



Webinar 9/23/21: Metastatic Breast Cancer in the Latino Community


Breast Cancer Latino Community

Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in Latinas. Systemic health inequities contribute to lower rates of breast cancer screening among Latinos, which leads to cancer diagnoses at later disease stages. This is why we're sharing Susan G. Komen’s 2021 ongoing webinar series on metastatic breast cancer (MBC)! The next two webinars, "MBC in the Hispanic/Latino Community," are set for 6 p.m. CT Sept. 23, 2021, in English and 6 p.m. CT Sept. 30, 2021, in Spanish. Panelists are: Dr. Filipa Lynce, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Director, Inflammatory Breast Center, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Jose Pablo Leone, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Director, Program for Breast Cancer in Men, Harvard Medical School Panelists will foster a safe, collaborative space to discuss ...

Read More

The Latino Gap in STEM Jobs and How to Fix It



As a result of COVID-19 and systemic injustice, Latinos are not faring well in the job market. Worse, Latinos are experiencing the widest gap in one of the nation’s fastest-growing fields — a career in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The depth of the gap could consign Latinos to lower paying jobs, according to a recent report from the Pew Research Center. “Black and Latino workers remain underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce compared with their share of all workers, including in computing jobs, which have seen considerable growth in recent years,” the Pew researchers state. What Is the Latino Gap in STEM Jobs? Latinos make up 17% of the overall workforce in the U.S. However, they only make up 8% of those ...

Read More

Study: Language Isolation Affects Latino Health


Language isolation

Older Latinos who live in neighborhoods where little English is spoken are at a higher risk of poor health and early death, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. “If you are linguistically isolated, you’re very likely to be isolated socially, and we know social isolation contributes to mortality,” said Kerstin Emerson, a co-author of the study. The study has implications for how language barriers and social cohesion in a community can affect health, particularly among elderly Latinos. What Does the Study Say about Language Isolation? Researchers at the University of Georgia’s College of Public Health conducted the study to determine if neighborhoods that are linguistically isolated impact health. The study analyzed data from a survey of over 1,100 ...

Read More

Inside the Revamp of the Thrifty Food Plan and the Massive Expansion of SNAP


Thrifty Food Plan Expansion SNAP

Lack of nutritious food can result in countless physical, social, and mental health complications. For many Latino families, governmental assistance programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), put food on the table and uplift out of poverty. But health experts say federal food aid needs expansion to help families in need. Fortunately, the Biden administration recently announced the modernization of the Thrifty Food Plan—used to calculate SNAP benefits—and a 25% rise the average SNAP benefit, the largest single increase in the program’s history. “The background formula was based on food preparation costs and nutrition standards that were developed in 1975,” Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry told the Indy ...

Read More

5 Ways to Engage Latinos to Support Healthier Drinks, Not Sugary Drinks


voices for healthy kids sugary drink tax graphic

By Reena Singh Guest Blogger, Voices for Healthy Kids Voices for Healthy Kids recently completed research to get the Latino community’s take on sugary drinks and sugary drink taxes. The research identified several messaging findings and strategies to help engage the Latino community in efforts to reduce the consumption of sugary drinks. Specifically, the research found after receiving more information, support for sugary drink taxes jumped 28%. So, what did we learn about building relationships and engagement with Latino communities on efforts to increase access to healthy beverages and reduce the consumption of sugary drinks? 1. Materials and Messages Need to Be in Spanish and English 45% of Latinos in the survey reported they speak Spanish daily. The majority (62%) of ...

Read More

Join the AHEAD Clinical Trial to Help Our Familias Prevent Memory Decline!


AHEAD Clinical Trial Familias Prevent Memory Decline

Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s than their white peers. Its why diversity in clinical trials is absolutely critical. Fortunately, those studies can help us fight back against Alzheimer’s. If you are age 55 to 80, you can volunteer for the AHEAD Clinical Trial that aims to protect against the onset of Alzheimer's disease, led by the experts at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio. “I got involved with the AHEAD clinical trial because both of my parents had Alzheimer’s,” Dave Ralberer, an AHEAD study participant and study partner, said. “My mother was 72 when she passed away. My dad has been struggling with the disease for 13 years. I have the unusual opportunity to be working with ...

Read More

The COVID-19 Booster Shot and What Latinos Should Know


COVID-19 Booster Shot Latinos

As medical experts work to fight back the COVID-19 Delta variant, the CDC released new vaccine guidelines that a third booster shot will be necessary. The CDC recommends that a booster shot be implemented eight months after the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to provide “long lasting protection.” The booster shot is expected to roll out the week of Sept. 20, 2021. More than anything, health experts say this third dose will go a long way in maximizing vaccine-induced protection and prolonging its durability, according to CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky. “Our top priority remains staying ahead of the virus and protecting the American people from COVID-19 with safe, effective, and long-lasting vaccines especially in the context of a constantly changing virus and ...

Read More

UPDATE: Health Equity Report Card Covers Social Vulnerability, COVID-19


Health Equity Report Card Covers Social Vulnerability, COVID-19

We have updated our Health Equity Report Card to include place-based information on your county’s Social Vulnerability Index Score and COVID-19 cases, deaths, and hospitalizations. The Salud America! Health Equity Report Card, first launched in 2017, auto-generates Latino-focused and local data with interactive maps and comparative gauges, which can help you visualize and explore inequities in housing, transit, poverty, health care, food, and education. You will see how your county stacks up in these health equity issues — now including social vulnerability and COVID-19 — compared to your state and the nation. Then you can share the Report Card with your local leaders to advocate for healthy change! Get your Health Equity Report Card! Why We Need to Consider ...

Read More

Study: Less Money is Spent on Latino Healthcare


Study: Less Money is Spent on Latino Healthcare

Healthcare spending is disproportionately skewed toward white people, with less money spent on Latino patients, according to new research from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation and others. “This study found statistically significant differences in estimated healthcare spending across six race/ethnicity groups, with differences present for total spending, age-standardized spending, spending by type of care, and health-condition-specific spending per notified case,” according to the study. The disparity has significant implications for policies needed for equity in healthcare spending. “Despite making up 18.5% of the U.S. population, only 11% of healthcare spending goes toward Latinos. We can address this disparity by examining the ...

Read More