Read More Resource Articles



Study: Americans are Delaying Cancer Screenings, Believe Racism Affects Health Care



Almost 60% of Americans believe that racism can impact the health care an individual receives, according to the National Cancer Opinion Survey conducted by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The survey also found that about two-thirds of Americans have skipped or delayed scheduled cancer screenings due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is disproportionately harming Latinos. These results have wide-ranging implications for preventative care and the perception of health care disparities in the United States. About the Survey on Racism, Health Care The National Cancer Opinion Survey is conducted annually. This year, ASCO surveyed over 4,000 U.S. adults older than 18, with over 1,000 of them former or current cancer patients. “This survey assesses Americans’ ...

Read More

Tanya Enriquez DelValle: Keep Going, and Going, to Overcome Breast Cancer


Tanya Enriquez DelValle

By Tanya Enriquez DelValle Breast Cancer Survivor in San Antonio Five years after being diagnosed with breast cancer at age 27, I got my first tattoo…the energizer bunny with the pink ribbon on the drum. I was going to keep going and going. Here I am now 50 and still cancer free! I have an incredible life. I am a counselor at Legacy of Educational Excellence (LEE) High School, married to the man of my dreams for 15 years, and excited about the next adventure in my life. Twenty-three years ago, on Nov. 21, 1997, my world changed when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I remember asking my doctors if I was going to die. They said, "Not anytime soon." That was all I needed to hear. From that point forward I decided that cancer was NOT going to get the best of me. ...

Read More

Update: Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States


covid-19 case death rates coronavirsu latino child mom parent kid

Coronavirus can affect anyone. But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities. What are the data really showing? UPDATE 10/28/20: Various new data state and U.S. data! COVID-19 Case Rates for Latinos Coronavirus is disproportionately sickening U.S. Latinos. Latinos and black people together comprise 55% of coronavirus cases, nearly double their U.S. population makeup, according to CDC data released June 15, 2020. The U.S. COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate is 193.7 per 100,000, according to CDC data updated on Oct. 23, 2020. That is compared to 120.9 on July 24. Hospitalization rates for Latinos are 4.5 times the rate among Whites. Here are some state examples of Latino coronavirus case ...

Read More

Blame the Transportation System, Not the Pedestrian


Transportation for America "fixed" this NHTSA graphic.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is celebrating pedestrians by designating October as the first-ever Pedestrian Safety Month and creating a playbook with social media materials to raise awareness. This is good, because pedestrians deserve safety on a road, parking lot, or crosswalk. But it’s not all good. NHTSA is mostly focused on individual pedestrian safety, as opposed to systemic policy changes. This is a form of pedestrian-blaming. By blaming the pedestrian, like in victim-blaming or justifying inequities, Pedestrian Safety Month actually distracts from efforts to address the very transportation systems that endanger pedestrians in the first place. We are excited to see that Transportation for America’s Twitter thread that modified NHTSA ...

Read More

Study: Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Children to the Hospital


Secondhand Smoke Sending Children Hospital

Exposure to the fumes from harmful tobacco products, such as cigarettes and cigars, can severely affect people, especially in children. Recent research shows that children who live with a smoker are more likely to become hospitalized than their peers living in smoke-free households. According to Dr. Ashley Merianos, an associate professor in the School of Human Services at the University of Cincinnati, this data does not come as a complete surprise. "In past studies, we found up to nearly one-in-two children who come to the pediatric emergency department are exposed to tobacco smoke," Merianos told The Denver Channel. "We also found that the children who had been exposed had increased respiratory-related procedures, increased diagnostic testing. So, for example, being tested for ...

Read More

What Are COVID-19 Long Haulers and Are Latinos at Risk?


COVID-19 ‘Long Haulers’ Latinos Long-Term Risk

Not all COVID-19 experiences are equal. For some, the illness’s side effects can last for weeks or even months. This group of severely affected individuals, referred to as “long haulers” by experts, is experiencing infection and lasting consequences. These maladies include shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue, and other symptoms. While there is only a general understanding of those who deal with prolonged coronavirus side-effects, there is enough data to see there is a problem, according to officials. “Anecdotally, there’s no question that there are a considerable number of individuals who have a postviral syndrome that really, in many respects, can incapacitate them for weeks and weeks following so-called recovery and clearing of the virus,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, ...

Read More

Study: Latino LGBTQ Youth at High Risk for Suicide


Latino LGBTQ Suicide

Latino LGBTQ youth are 30% more likely to attempt suicide than non-Latino LGBTQ youth, according to a new study by the Trevor Project, a non-profit focused on suicide prevention for LGBTQ youth. Part of the reason is the stress-related stigma, discrimination, and difficulties expressing gender and sexual identity, which many LGBTQ people of color face. But, unfortunately, Latino LGBTQ youth also often deal with the stress of immigration, which can take a heavy toll on a person’s mental health. “The higher risk of attempting suicide among Latinx LGBTQ youth compared to non-Latinx LGBTQ youth can be explained by greater worries about themselves or family being detained or deported due to immigration policies,” according to the Trevor Project. LGBTQ and Mental Health Members ...

Read More

Let’s ‘Anchor It’ to Protect Kids from Deadly Tip-Overs



Many families are staying home more than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But only about 80% of parents realize that furniture tip-overs can lead to injuries and death among children. Only about half have safety anchored a TV or furniture at home, according to a recent survey by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which created the Anchor It! safety campaign. Parents who did not anchor said they didn't think it was needed, as long as they were watching the kids. That's why Anchor It! has a new English and Spanish video, "Even When You're Watching," to help parents understand the dangers of furniture tip-overs. "[The video] contains real-life footage that vividly demonstrates just how quickly a tip-over can happen, even when parents are in the same room watching ...

Read More

How Cities are Using Community-Based Workers for Effective Contact Tracing


Community-Based Workforce

As we continue the battle against COVID-19, public health authorities are urging cities to increase their contact tracing efforts. “Contact tracing is key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and helps protect you, your family, and your community,” according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. But identifying people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and tracking their whereabouts and potential infection sources has its challenges. People may be skeptical to release information to contact tracers calling on the phone if they’re wary of scams. And because COVID-19 disproportionately affects Latino and other minority communities, there may be a language barrier or sense of fear when discussing health information with state employees. What can be done to face ...

Read More