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How to Boost Your Mental Health Over the Holidays


Happy volunteer looking at donation box

Stressed-out and down this holiday season? You might have the "holiday blues." These are temporary feelings of depression associated with the extra stress, financial constraints, and unrealistic expectations of the season. These can harm long-term mental health. You might have "seasonal affective disorder." This is a seasonal depression that happens at the same time every year as the season change, such as the bleak wintertime months. These conditions are especially worrisome for people who suffer high rates of mental health issues. Latinos, for example, already face higher rates of depressive symptoms than many of their peers. Fewer Latinos than whites say their child had ever used mental health care services, according to a Salud America! research review. So what can you ...

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Why Telling Latinas to ‘Just Exercise’ is a Big Mistake



Eat right and exercise. You’ve probably heard this health message a thousand times. But there’s a growing case for health professionals to ditch the word “exercise,” as it actually may hinder Latinas from getting the disease-preventing physical activity they need. Why? Read on. Latina Physical Activity & Inactivity Physical activity, like walking, dancing, gardening, and playing with kids can improve blood glucose control and prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. New federal physical activity guidelines just came out confirming the health benefits of physical activity. However, Latinos are less likely than other groups to meet these recommendations, and physical inactivity is one reason Latinas have the highest lifetime risk for diabetes across all ...

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Texas Kids Are Most Uninsured in America


hispanic kid child girl cough sick no health insurance

The number of U.S. kids without health insurance is rising for the first time in 10 years. Texas has the highest number of children without health insurance in America, according to a new report by Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. The report found that more than 1 in 5 uninsured kids in the U.S. live in Texas, which is 835,000 as of 2017. From 2016 to 2017, Texas saw an increase of 83,000 uninsured kids. This is bad news for Latinos. Latinos, set to be the largest racial/ethnic population in Texas by 2022, are already the most uninsured U.S. group. Latino Kids and the Report This is the second-straight year Texas has had the nation's highest rate of uninsured children. There are many reasons for this, experts say. First, Texas has a greater ...

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The Colossal Latina Pay Gap


latina pay gap data 2

U.S. Latinas are paid 47% less than white men on average, according to the National Partnership for Women and Families. Furthermore, Latinas are paid 31% less than White women. Regardless of their job, where they live, or their education, Latinas are paid less. This is not good. In the United States, one in five women is Latina. Latina Wage Gap Latinos already suffer a wide wealth divide than their white peers. Latina women specifically are paid 54 cents for every $1 paid to white non-Latino men, according to the new data. “Latinas face biases for being women and for being people of color. These compounding biases contribute to the Latina pay gap and help explain the inequality Latinas experience in the workplace” said Rachel Thomas, president of ...

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Sally Diaz: Breast Cancer Survivorship Symbolizes Strength, Bravery


Sallie Diaz with Stanlie Murray

By Sally Diaz San Antonio Cancer Survivor On May 5, 2014, just 6 days before Mother’s Day, my world came crashing down. I was diagnosed with Stage 3 Triple Negative Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. I noticed my lump on accident while waking up from bed and stretching. I was 42, married, and a mother of a 10-year-old girl and a 12-year-old boy. I tested negative for genetic testing and I had no history of breast cancer in my family. Within two weeks of my diagnosis my roller coaster ride had begun and I was admitted into the hospital so that a medi-port could be implanted in my chest for chemotherapy. My life has never been the same. As a mother diagnosed with cancer, the first thought that comes to your mind is your children and the fear that you will not be there for ...

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How to Merge Public Transit with Complete Streets


Healthline station with pedestrian crossing and bike lanes. Source: FDOT

Florida reinvented how they implement Complete Streets a few years ago, even adding coordinators to help each district create roads for people who travel by foot, bike, car, and more. And they didn’t forget about public transit. In fact, the Florida Department of Transportation’s (FDOT) created a guidebook to instruct and show examples of how to make public transit─trains, buses, & trolleys─a big part of Complete Streets. Read more below in Part 2 of Salud America!’s three-part series on transportation changes in Florida. Part 1 examined Florida’s reinvention of Complete Streets. Part 3 will cover pedestrian death reduction. Integrating Transit and Complete Streets Complete Streets can save lives by providing safe options for people to walk, bike and use public ...

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The Scary Reason Latino Men Don’t Get the Best Prostate Cancer Treatment


latino man and nurse doctor pensive chart implicit bias

All of us have unconscious or involuntary stereotypes that affect our feelings and actions about other people based on characteristics such as race, ethnicity, age, and appearance. This is called "implicit bias." Implicit bias can harm relationships, policies, and even health. In fact, implicit bias is a big reason why Latino men are much less likely to receive optimal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer than White men, according to a new study in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This is bad news for Latinos. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men of all races, including Latinos. The Prostate Cancer Disparity Between 2010-2014, researchers from UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Stanford Cancer ...

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Rural Pharmacy Deserts Emerge Across the U.S.


closing of a walgreen's pharmacy from the Anniston Star

Hospital closures have become the norm in many rural areas. Now, rural pharmacies are headed on the same path, according to a U.S. News Report. Over the past 16 years, 1,231 rural, independently-owned pharmacies have closed. That's 16% of all rural pharmacies. Fewer than 6,400 pharmacies are left in rural communities. Rural communities that had at least one retail (independent, chain, or franchise) pharmacy in March 2003 had no retail pharmacy in March 2018, according to RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis Rural Policy Brief. Residents of rural communities now have to travel great distances for medications and/or turn to mail-order prescriptions that make it impossible for in-person consultation concerning questions about the medication. “Closure of ...

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4 Easy Actions to Promote Health Equity for Thanksgiving


smiling latina women with megaphone raise voice speak up

Thanksgiving is a time for giving back. It's a perfect opportunity to raise your voice and take action to create health equity for Latino and all families this holiday season! 1. Make a Comment on Public Charge! Every family deserves a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. But the Trump administration's proposed change to the Public Charge rule could penalize legal immigrants if they use public benefits, such as food assistance or housing, according to the National Immigration Law Center. The government wants your input on this by Dec. 10, 2018! COPY the below model comment. HIT "Comment Now" button. PASTE the comment with YOUR EDIT. Immigrant families deserve a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible, just like all people in (ADD ...

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