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Update: Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States


Latino mental health sad Latina with face mask covid

The coronavirus COVID-19 can affect anyone. But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities. What are the data really showing? UPDATE 12/1/21: New U.S., state, and city data! COVID-19 Case Rates for Latinos The U.S. population recently rose to 18.5% Latino. But coronavirus is disproportionately sickening Latinos. Variants like Delta and Omicron are rising. Latinos currently comprise 25% of COVID-19 cases in the United States, second only to Whites (54.7%), according to CDC data on health equity and cases on Nov. 30, 2021. Race/ethnicity data is available for 66% of the nation's cases. COVID-19-associated hospitalizations are also higher among Latinos. States are also experiencing Latino ...

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How Can We Fix Health Insurance for Latinos?


Fix Health Insurance Latinos

In the U.S., Latinos are uninsured nearly three times more than their white peers. Given that Latinos are projected to grow to 25% of the population by 2045, this lack of healthcare coverage will continue to endanger the health of many more individuals, families, and the healthcare system. A recent federal report shows just how large this problem is and why it is critical that civic and business leaders address it. “Latinos have consistently been overrepresented in the uninsured population,” states the report from the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). “Prior to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Latinos had the second-highest nonelderly uninsurance rate among ethnic and racial populations with more than 30% uninsured. “Studies ...

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New Health Equity Language Guide Helps Fight Implicit Bias & Discrimination


New Health Equity Language Guide Helps Fight Implicit Bias & Discrimination

The AAMC Center for Health Justice and American Medical Association (AMA) co-developed a new guide on inclusive language to advance health equity. “Designed for physicians and other health care professionals, Advancing Health Equity: AMA-AAMC Guide on Language, Narrative, and Concepts provides guidance and promotes a deeper understanding of equity-focused, first-person language and why it matters,” according to the AAMC Center for Health Justice. The guide is broken down sections on language to use to promote health equity, why these narratives matter, and a glossary that defines key terminology. Using inclusive language is important for healthcare providers to ensure that they are giving culturally comprehensive care that is absent of implicit bias or discrimination, which ...

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COVID-19 Pandemic Causing Loss of Children’s Primary or Secondary Caregiver



Many children in the U.S. have lost a parent or caregiver due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, 1 in 500 U.S. children have experienced COVID-19 associated orphanhood, and Latinos and others of color are particularly affected, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics.  “From April 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021, data suggest that more than 140,000 children under age 18 in the United States lost a parent, custodial grandparent, or grandparent caregiver who provided the child’s home and basic needs, including love, security, and daily care,” states the study, led by researchers at CDC, Harvard University, Imperial College of London, and others. The study found that the pandemic accentuated racial, ethnic, and geographical disparities associated with the deaths of ...

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Latinos Suffer Higher Rates of Liver, Cervical, and Stomach Cancers


Latinos Suffer Higher Rates Cancers

Cancer can affect anyone. But Latinos experience higher rates of infection-related cancers, ones that are preventable, than their white peers, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society (ACS). In fact, Latinos suffer two times higher rates of liver and stomach cancers—infection-related but preventable cancers—than their white peers. “Addressing this critical gap for Hispanic individuals in obtaining access to high-quality cancer prevention, early detection and treatment is going to be essential for mitigating the predicted growth in the cancer burden,” wrote Kimberly Miller, an ACS scientist, in the report. “In addition, more research is needed to assess not only the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the utilization of cancer care, but also the impact ...

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Try Cryotherapy for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Clinical Trial at UT Health San Antonio!


cryo trial

Medicine, radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery are common ways to treat breast cancer. Researchers are also exploring new, possibly better treatments and procedures in breast cancer clinical trials, which are carefully controlled research studies. In some cases, clinical trials may be the only way to get access to newer treatments. If you have breast cancer, you can find a new option for treatment by volunteering for the Evaluation of Cryotherapy and TRPA1 Receptors in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathy at Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio. Cryotherapy uses extreme cold to freeze and kill cancer cells and control pain. The trial, for women ages 18 and older, including Latinas, aims to better treat women who are suffering at the hands of breast cancer. “It’s ...

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The Latest on Alzheimer’s Disease Is Now Available in Spanish!


Alzheimers disease website dementia latinos spanish espanol

Did you know that every 65 seconds, someone develops Alzheimer’s disease? This number is most troubling for Latinos and women. Latinos overall are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s than their White peers. Two-thirds of Alzheimer’s patients are women. Latinas are at higher risk than non-Latinas. In response, the federal government created a website, Alzheimers.gov, for dementia information, resources, and clinical trials. Now that website is also in Spanish at Alzheimers.gov/es! Each website has: Information about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Knowledge and resources for caregivers and people living with dementia. Clinical trials and studies that people can join to help advance ...

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What Parents Should Know: Children Ages 5 to 11 Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine


What Parents Should Know: Children Ages 5 to 11 Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine

On Oct. 29, 2021, the FDA authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use for children ages 5 to 11. It had previously been approved for those ages 12 and older. The move will make the vaccine available to 28 million children in this age group. Getting children vaccinated is vital for controlling the spread of the pandemic, especially as many schools have returned to in-person learning. Do you have questions about the Pfizer vaccine and want to know more before your children get vaccinated? Here’s what Latino parents should know. Is the vaccine safe for children? Why was it produced so quickly? Yes. Numerous clinical trials with young children have found that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is safe and effective for children. COVID-19 vaccines are being ...

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Take a Survey: Latinos, How Has COVID-19 Impacted You?



The Rutgers Community Health Justice Lab is inviting Latinos to complete this brief anonymous survey to understand the long-term impacts of COVID-19 on Latino health. The survey, which takes 45 minutes to complete, is available in Spanish and English. You can also enter a raffle for one of five $100 gift cards. "Understanding how Hispanics and Latinos have been impacted by the COVID pandemic is critical to guide efforts in reducing health inequity," according to survey creators Pamela Valera and Humberto Baquerizo and their team at Rutgers University. Why Latinos Should Participate in this COVID-19 Survey? COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted the Latino community. COVID-19 pandemic is worsening historical inequities among racial/ethnic minorities. “This is robbing ...

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