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New Report: Housing Prices Outpacing the Rate of Wage Growth


Home Prices are Rising at Twice the Rate of Wage Growth- New Report

Nearly two-thirds of renters nationwide say they can’t afford to buy a home. According to ATTOM Data Solutions' latest Rental Affordability Report, home prices are rising at twice the rate of wage growth. “With rental affordability outpacing home affordability in the majority of U.S. housing markets, and home prices rising faster than rental rates, the American dream of owning a home, maybe just that — a dream,” ATTOM Data Solutions Director of Content Jennifer von Pohlmann told HousingWire. April marked the 10th consecutive month with year-over-year declines, according to the report, contributing to a positive outlook for the housing market. Despite a slight uptick in July, last year saw the lowest number of foreclosures since 2005. Last month, year-over-year ...

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Dr. Amelie Ramirez to Chair New Department of Population Health Sciences at UT Health San Antonio


Amelie Ramirez Latino Health Champion 2018

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at the the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio and a leading health disparities researcher, has been named chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, announced Dr. Robert Hromas, dean of the Long School of Medicine. The appointment is effective June 1. Dr. Hromas also announced that the department will be renamed the Department of Population Health Sciences. The new department will continue to provide services in all biological and medical analytical areas. It will also focus on efforts to use analytical tools to enhance the health of the unique populations in San Antonio and South Texas. Dr. Ramirez will continue to serve as director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research, ...

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Harmful Water Contamination Present in Nearly All U.S. States


PFAS contamination 43 states

Researchers now estimate that 19 million Americans face dangerous chemical exposure from the water coming from their sinks and faucets. Over 600 public water systems, military bases, airports, industrial plants, and other sites contain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination. Worse, this is a wide-spread problem affecting people in 43 states, according to new research from the Environmental Working Group (EWG). “The Environmental Protection Agency has utterly failed to address PFAS with the seriousness this crisis demands, leaving local communities and states to grapple with a complex problem rooted in the failure of the federal chemical regulatory system,” said Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group. Findings of EWG’s Report The study’s ...

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Rates of Fatty Liver Disease Rising in Latino Kids



A lack of access to healthy, sustainable food is causing Latino kids to develop severe health conditions including issues with their internal organs. One significant issue of concern is pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The rate of diagnoses is increasing among Latino kids, Kaiser Health News reports. “Fatty liver disease is ripping through the Latino community like a silent tsunami and especially affecting children,” said Dr. Rohit Kohli, chief of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition at the University of Southern California and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. The ailment is also linked to genetics as well as high levels of sugar and fat in diets. Fatty Liver Disease & Latino Kids Before 2006, many doctors did not know that children could develop ...

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Erika Zamarripa: Learning to Live After Breast Cancer


Erika Zamarripa breast cancer survivor San Antonio

By Erika Zamarripa San Antonio Cancer Survivor There is that "C" word again. Cancer can be defined as a "disease caused by an uncontrolled division of abnormal cells in a part of the body." Or it also can be defined as a "practice or phenomenon perceived to be evil or destructive and hard to contain or eradicate." Whatever you want to call it, it sucks. I was diagnosed with Stage 2 ER positive breast cancer at the age of 32 on Dec. 18, 2013. My twin boys were only 9 years old at the time and I was working at H-E-B Pharmacy. I remember one day taking a shower and I felt a lump on my breast. This lump hurt when I touched it and the longer, I felt it, the more I started to worry. I called my gynecologist and made an appointment. He felt it and sent me for a mammogram and an ...

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Latinos Diabetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations


Latinos Daibetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations Than Whites

Diabetes development can lead to numerous life-changing complications when the disease spirals out of control, including the amputation of limbs. As the prevalence of the illness continues to rise––30 million Americans are estimated to have diabetes––black and Latino patients are more likely to have an amputation compared to non-Hispanic whites, CNN reports. Diabetic foot complications exact a substantial clinical and economic toll in acute care settings, particularly among the rural and working poor. The Centers for Disease Control reports that in 2014, an estimated 29.1 million adults in the United States, or 9.3% of the adult population, had diabetes. In California (39.1% Latino), minority groups were more than twice as likely as whites to undergo amputations, ...

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E-Cigarettes: Nicotine’s Newest Red Herring


Vape chemical risk

For years, tobacco companies gained profits through lies and deception — now, e-cigarette producers are following in their predecessors’ footsteps, health experts say. Since its inception, vape manufacturers like Juul promoted their products as a “safer” alternative to smoking cigarettes, and even as a way to gradually quit smoking altogether. However, there is no substantial evidence backing these claims. Studies are actually beginning to show the exact opposite. The overall lack of knowledge concerning e-cigs is a notable risk to users, according to the FDA’s former Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb, and current Principal Deputy Commissioner, Amy Abernethy. “While we believe that currently addicted adult smokers who completely switch off of combustible tobacco and ...

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Medicare’s ‘What’s Covered’ Mobile App Now in Spanish


Medicare what's covered app

U.S. Latinos are at higher risk for diabetes, obesity, and other health conditions than their White peers. Yet they face many barriers in accessing Medicare and other healthcare coverage. A new app can help these Latinos. Medicare's first and only app, “What’s covered,” is now available in English or Spanish. The app delivers accurate cost, coverage, and eligibility details for Original Medicare Part A and Part B items and services. The app is free on both the App Store and Google Play. To download the app in Spanish, just search for “Qué está cubierto.” What Can the App Do? Medicare's new app takes some of the most popular information from the Medicare website. It ensures beneficiaries have personalized, accessible guidance to make informed decisions about their ...

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8 Unconventional Ways to Celebrate Cinco de Mayo


diverse group volunteering for environmental clean up

What are you doing for Cinco de Mayo? Many will use it as an excuse to party with margaritas and tacos. We at Salud America! invite you to think outside the box and celebrate Cinco de Mayo in one of six unconventional ways. 1. Find Out What Cinco de Mayo Really Means Cinco de Mayo ("Fifth of May") does not celebrate Mexico's Independence Day. Mexico won independence on Sept. 16, 1810. Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican Army's unlikely victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla, on May 5, 1862, under the leadership of General Ignacio Zaragoza. Still, it has evolved into an observance of Mexican heritage. "In the 1950s, Chicano activists turned Cinco de Mayo into a commemorative holiday used to educate Mexican Americans about their cultural heritage," ...

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