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Pramod Sukumaran

Sukumaran completed a PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology and an MPH in Population Health Analytics. He curates content for Salud America! on family support and health projects at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio. His emphases is on the latest research, reports and resources related to various disease and policies, to improve Latino health.


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Articles by Pramod Sukumaran

Latino Participation Vital in Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials


Latino Alzheimer Clinical Trials

Across the board, Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research. Without adequate Latino and minority representation in clinical trials, researchers cannot find differential effects among groups nor advance public health and medicine. To address this, researchers across the country, like those at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, are creating educational interventions to recruit certain racial/ethnic groups in diseases like Alzheimer's that are on the rise among minorities. "Studies should represent the demographics of the country," Dr. Jonca Bull, an assistant commissioner on minority health at the Food and Drug Administration, said in a recent statement. "We need to close that gap so we can better ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 11/10: Let’s Celebrate Our Caregivers!


Latino-man-and-woman-caregivers-tweetchat

8 million people are leaving the workforce to take care of elderly family members. These caregivers will enter an extremely high-stress situation. Latino caregivers may spend more hours a week meeting their sick relative’s needs, than caregivers from other ethnic groups. For National Family Caregivers Month in November, let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, to tweet about how we can address the problems and solutions to help caregivers! WHAT: #SaludTues: Let's Celebrate Our Caregivers! TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST (Noon-1 p.m. CST), Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: @UsA2_Latinos, @DiverseElders, @VocesenSalud, @SAresearch, @AlzheimersLA, @Wellmedgives Special Guest: Ernesto Quintero ...

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Latino Homeownership Is on the Rise (Even in a Pandemic)


Latino Homeownership on the Rise Despite Pandemic Impacts

In spite of the countless burdens of COVID-19 on Latinos, rates of increased household wealth have been on the rise. In fact, 40% of Latinos who do not own a home plan to become homeowners by 2025, according to a recent survey conducted by the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals (NAHREP). This presents a shift, not only in the housing market but in the state of race and class in the U.S., according to Veronica Figueroa, a veteran realtor in Orlando. “In recent years, Latinos have proven to be more confident than ever when it comes to homeownership and entrepreneurship," Figueroa told Click Orlando. "We are also seeing overwhelming confidence in Latino investors who choose to invest in real estate. Latinos are overcoming the stigma of being considered an ...

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New Bilingual Tool Helps People Get Affordable Insulin to Manage Diabetes


New Online Tool Helps People Get Affordable Insulin

Latinos and other people who have diabetes are getting more access to much-needed supplies amid COVID-19. Beyond Type 1—a diabetes nonprofit organization—launched a new bilingual tool last week: GetInsulin.org. This online platform is a tool to help those using insulin find inexpensive options. It also has assistance programs for patients in any financial circumstances. “The job losses we’ve seen during COVID-19 mean that many individuals who lost their employer-based health insurance due to COVID-19 are experiencing insulin access issues for the first time in their lives,” Christel Marchand Aprigliano, Beyond Type 1's chief advocacy officer, told Healio. “List prices for insulin are high, so a sudden insurance loss may leave an individual facing a high price tag at ...

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Berkeley Bans Junk Food in Store Checkout Aisles


BerkeleyPasses Ban Junk Food in Store Checkout Aisles

The United States has one of the highest childhood obesity rates in the world. That statistic sounds worse when considering the ways companies target unhealthy foods and drinks to Latino and other children of color — all contributing to health inequities and a higher obesity. This is why civic leaders in Berkeley, Calif., passed legislation to make it the the first U.S. city to ban junk food and candy in grocery checkout aisles. The will will go into effect early next year. "Placement of unhealthy snacks near a register increases the likelihood that customers will purchase these foods and drinks when willpower is weak at the end of a long shopping trip," City Council member Kate Harrison said in a press release. The Ban of Junk Food in Store Checkout Aisles Although a ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/6: Let’s Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Our Abuelos and Abuelas, Like Coco


coco theme tweetchat on alzheimer's for abuelos for hispanic heritage month

Just like in the movie Coco, our abuelos and abuelas are more susceptible to Alzheimer's Disease. Studies suggest that Latinos in the United States are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than white non-Latinos. This is because of genetics, lifestyle, socioeconomic risk, and other factors, even amid the coronavirus pandemic. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, to tweet about how we can prevent dementia and Alzheimer's in our abuelos and abuelas, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month. WHAT: #SaludTues: Let’s Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Our Abuelos and Abuelas, Like Coco TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST (Noon-1 p.m. CST), Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS:@UsA2_Latinos ...

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Why a Large Scale Alzheimer’s Study is Critical for Latinos


Large Scale Alzheimer Study Latinos

Among the countless disparities Latinos face, the way in which people's brains age might differ based on their race. That is what researchers at University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth will study after reciving increased funding for large-scale Alzheimer's biomarker study from the National Institute of Health (NIH). Mainly, they will be looking into health gaps in brains aging between Mexican Americans compared to their white peers. "To successfully battle and ultimately prevent or treat a complex disease such as Alzheimer's, we need to understand how this disease and other forms of dementia affect our nation's diverse communities differently," Dr. Eliezer Masliah, director of the NIA Division of Neuroscience, said in a press release. This award was made ...

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More Cities, States Pass Ban on Flavored Vaping amid COVID-19


More Cities and States Passes Ban on Flavored Vaping Amid COVID-19

Since the start of the pandemic, many health experts say smoking and vaping increase the risk of COVID-19. This happens by weakening the function of the lungs making it more susceptible to coronavirus — as well as its overall impacts. Moreover, new data from Stanford University shows that young people who vape are more susceptible to COVID-19 than those who do not. That data—collected from a May 2020 national survey of 13- to 24-year-olds—showed that vapers are five times more likely to get COVID-19. Many cities and states across the US are passing bans on flavored vaping products during the COVID-19 pandemic. Flavored Vaping Bans Across the Country Last month the California State Assembly passed a ban on the sale of flavored tobacco products, including e-cigarettes and ...

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