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Pramod Sukumaran

Sukumaran completed a PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology and an MPH in Population Health Analytics. He curates content for Salud America! on family support and health projects at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio. His emphases is on the latest research, reports and resources related to various disease and policies, to improve Latino health.


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Articles by Pramod Sukumaran

Why Do Latinos Have a Harder Time Quitting Cigarettes?



Latino adults smoke cigarettes at a lower rate (12.1%) than their white peers (19.4%). However, once they’ve started, Latinos are more likely to keep smoking and only half as likely as whites to successfully quit smoking, according to the UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center. Experts say the reasons why fewer Latinos quit is complex. “You’re looking at a population with fewer alternatives to cope,” David Williams, a public-health professor at Harvard University, told whyy.org. "That makes it harder for them to give up that aid.” 'Hard to Quit' Reason: Little Access to Help Latino smokers lack access to support for quitting smoking. They have the lowest rate of health insurance coverage among racial/ethnic groups. They also experience lower levels of ...

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Why Are Fewer Latinos Enrolling in Obamacare This Year?


obamacar ACA health coverage insurance enrollment

Healthcare agencies are seeing a big decline in the number of Central Texas Latinos signing up for Obamacare health insurance through HealthCare.gov, TPR reports. This decline might be happening in other Latino-populated parts of the U.S., too. In fact, with less than a week before the sign-up period for 2019 Obamacare plans ends on Dec. 15, 2018, national health insurance sign-ups are down 11% through the first five weeks compared with the same time last year via HealthCare.gov, the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchange. Why the Decline? Experts who have been following ACA enrollment closely cite several factors. According the latest reports, the Trump administration erased a Latino outreach guide from the ACA website. This violates ACA regulations ...

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The Midterms: Big Wins (and Losses) for Affordable Housing


affordable housing sign (via Associated Press)

U.S. housing is at its least affordable in 10 years, according to a recent report. So it was no surprise to see lots of affordable housing and rent control measures on local and state ballots during the Nov. 6 midterm election. Voters showed mixed results for affordable housing. Wins occurred in Texas, North Carolina, and Washington. Arizona suffered a big loss. California felt like a split decision. “Tremendous local and state victories on ballot initiatives to address homelessness and housing poverty mean new affordable homes for the people most in need and new alliances and momentum for bigger victories to come,” Diane Yentel, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, said in a statement. “And yesterday proved that housing is a winning campaign ...

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Major Steps toward Affordable Housing in Austin, Texas


M Station affordable housing units in Austin, Texas (via Hatch + Ulland Owen Architects)

Access to safe, affordable housing is a priority for good health. Access to housing protects families and promotes feelings of security that can reduce stress. Affordable housing located near safe parks, full-service grocery stores, and living-wage employment helps to build community and encourages healthy eating and exercise. Two new initiatives will try to help solve the lack of affordable housing in Austin, Texas (34.5% Latino). $250 Million for Affordable Housing In November 2018, Austin voters overwhelmingly approved a $250 million bond for affordable housing. Here's where the money will go: $100 million for the Austin Housing Finance Corporation to buy land. The city then can give the land to affordable housing developers. $94 million to go to ...

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Colorado City Could Mandate More Affordable Housing


construction hard hat housing development

Longmont City Council preliminarily approved an ordinance that would mandate 12% of the livable square footage in a new residential development be dedicated to units affordable to low- and moderate-income home buyers and renters. Home buyers making 80 percent of the area median income and renters making 60 percent of the area median income can afford these units. The ordinance still needs final council approval. In many “big cities” in the United States, housing costs force some low-income and Latino families to make difficult financial decisions, new initiatives like these must be promoted in many cities. Longmont, Colo., has a population of 90,719 people with a median age of 36.9 and a median household income of $62,847. Longmont has 26% Latino population. The ...

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Study: Latinos Underestimate their Own Contributions in the United States



Most Latinos in America underestimate their contribution to the United States, according to a new study from the We All Are Human foundation. The study of more than 2,500 Latinos ages 14 and older analyzed their political, business, and educational views. Participants shared thoughts on 16 positive Latino accomplishments, such as launching more new business and achieving higher levels of education More than 77% of participants expressed disbelief around six of these significant Latino achievements. "Overwhelmingly, Latinos are saying that they're under-valued and that their contributions aren't fully appreciated," said Claudia Romo Edelman, founder of We All Are Human, in a press release. More Study Findings on Latino Confidence 82% of Latinos feel their community should ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 11/20: Enrolling Latino Families in Healthcare Coverage


Health Overhaul Texas

Only 1 in 10 who enrolled for healthcare coverage via HealthCare.gov were Latino, a lower rate than their black and white peers, according to the federal data. Many Latinos thus miss out on better healthcare access. How can we help? Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018, to tweet how to help Latino parents and kids get the healthcare coverage they need before the end of Open Enrollment on Dec. 15! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: How to Encourage Latino families to Enroll in Healthcare Coverage TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, November 20th, 2018 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: The National Hispanic Medical Association (@NHMA) OPTIONAL HASHTAGS: #GetCovered #OpenEnrollment ...

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Most People Underestimate Latinos’ Environmental Concerns—Even Latinos


Are Latinos are concern about Environment

Most Americans underestimate just how concerned Latinos and other minority groups are about environmental threats, including members of those groups, according to a new study by Cornell University. Researchers surveyed 1,200 Americans about their levels of concern for the environment. They found widespread underestimation of the environmental concerns of a broad range of racial/ethnic and sociodemographic groups. This underestimation was largest for judgments of minorities’ and low-income Americans’ concerns—groups that indicate high levels of environmental concern in public opinion surveys. Also, most people associate the term "environmentalist" with whites and the well-educated. "We found a very consistent pattern that if the American public thought a group was very ...

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Study: Latino Men Born in the U.S are More Inclined to Obesity



Latino men who are born or live in the United States for more than five years are twice as likely to be obese than those born outside the U.S., according to a new study from Florida State University study in the American Journal of Men's Health. This could become a problem for the U.S. workforce. "[Latinos] are also gradually becoming the majority of blue-collar workers. It is important to know about the health conditions of our labor force. If we do not, those conditions could become a public health burden in the future," said Amy Ai of Florida State, who led the study, in a press release. Why More Obesity in U.S.-Born Latinos? Ai and her team found that those who lived in the U.S. for more than 21 years were 1.5 times more likely to become obese than other foreign-born men. ...

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