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Pramod Sukumaran

Sukumaran completed a PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology and an MPH in Population Health Analytics. He curates content for Salud America! on family support and health projects at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio. His emphases is on the latest research, reports and resources related to various disease and policies, to improve Latino health.


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Articles by Pramod Sukumaran

Coronavirus and its Impacts on the Affordable Housing Crisis



The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting health equity in many ways, including homelessness, evictions, and affordable housing options. Low-income workers, the uninsured, those with unstable housing, and immigrant communities will bear the brunt of this crisis. Many U.S. cities were dealing with a homelessness crisis long before this outbreak. Now, the escalating pandemic has created a catastrophe threatening thousands of lives. Affordable Housing Crisis during COVID-19 Millions of Americans face housing cost burdens. Over half a million sleep on the streets any given night, according to a recent report. Worse, countless people and families pay more than they can afford to keep a roof over their heads every month. The coronavirus outbreak is a public health emergency that will ...

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How Does Coronavirus Impact People with Cancer, Diabetes, and Heart Disease?



The spread of coronavirus, COVID-19, is now a global pandemic. Health officials are working tirelessly to inform the public. They are working on a fast-paced method for widespread testing, and doing everything possible to slow the spread of the coronavirus. What is still scary? This disease impacts those with underlying conditions more significantly, especially Latinos who suffer vast health disparities. "People with diabetes, heart disease, lung disease and other serious underlying conditions are more likely to develop serious outcomes, including death [due to coronavirus]," said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CNBC reports. Coronavirus COVID-19's Impact on People With Underlying Illnesses Reported ...

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Coronavirus Hospitalizations a Rising Concern for Young Adults


young adults walking exercise coronavirus covid-19

Older people are highly susceptible to the coronavirus COVID-19, but young adults aren't off the hook, either. Almost 40% of U.S. coronavirus patients who were sick enough to need hospitalization were between the ages of 20 to 54, according to recent CDC data. "I think everyone should be paying attention to this," Stephen S. Morse, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, told the New York Times. "It's not just going to be the elderly. There will be people age 20 and up. They do have to be careful, even if they think that they're young and healthy." Why Coronavirus is a Concern for Young People Globally, officials are reporting 246,276 confirmed cases or coronavirus, with 90,000 recoveries and 10,000 deaths. Out of the 508 U.S. ...

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Big Win: FDA Approves Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarette Packs!


fda graphic warning labels for cigarette packs smoking child

FDA approved listened to public input and approved 11 new anti-smoking graphic warning labels that it will require tobacco companies to add to cigarette packs starting June 18, 2021. The warnings feature written statements with photo-realistic color images depicting some serious health risks of cigarette smoking. These include impact to fetal growth, cardiac disease, diabetes, and more. Last year, over 402 members of the Salud America! network sent emails to FDA to speak in favor of the warning labels for cigarette packages and advertisements. "The 11 finalized cigarette health warnings represent the most significant change to cigarette labels in more than 35 years," said Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products, in a news release. "[This] will considerably ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 3/24: What You Should Know About the Coronavirus Infection


Liver cancer and hepatitis viruses

The coronavirus outbreak has sickened many and continues to spread around the world. The World Health Organization on March 11th, 2020 declared the novel coronavirus outbreak a pandemic. The virus is spreading rapidly and according WHO all countries should focus on containment and spread the precautionary information among public. Let’s use #SaludTues on March 24, 2020, to tweetchat about ways to prevent the spread of Coronavirus! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “What You Should Know about Coronavirus Infection!” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Mar, 24, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS:  Public Health Maps @PublicHealthMap, Everyday Health @EverydayHealth Communicate for Health Justice @_CFHJ COVID-19 ...

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Health Experts: Coronavirus Risk Increased by Smoking, Vaping


coronavirus smoking mask disease risk

Health experts say smoking and vaping weakens the function of the lungs and could leave people more susceptible to coronavirus (COVID-19), which has sickened many and continues to spread around the world. Coronavirus is now a pandemic, according to the World Health Organization. Serious consequences of COVID-19 feature pneumonia and affects the lung function, and is especially worrysome for those with weak lung or immune systems, reports Guardian Australia. Basically, this means now is a good time to quit smoking. "For most respiratory infections, you worry about people who smoke a bit more," said UK Professor Christopher Whitty, The Tab reports. "They’re more likely to get [coronavirus] and their immune system is less good." Are Smokers More Susceptible to Coronavirus ...

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SNAP’s Online Grocery Program Provides Healthy Food


Online food shopping SNAP Latinos

Food deserts cause countless American families to struggle with access to nutritious, healthy meals. While this issue is pervasive, government agencies are trying to make progress in this issue with novel approaches — using the ever-growing technological landscape. In 2014, the Farm Bill passed by congress introduced an Online Purchase Pilot (OPP) that gave beneficiaries an option to use SNAP to purchase groceries online for delivery. A recent study out of Yale University found this program has the potential to help those families who live in areas that lack access to fresh foods and produce. "For individuals using SNAP, there's been a lot of bad rap about the quality of food that they purchase, and there's not been a lot of focus on trying to support individuals getting ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/25: Healthy Latino Hearts


hispanic man heart attack

February is American Heart Month. While awareness is important for all people, certain groups—like Latinos—are at a higher risk for heart-related diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of death in the United States. For Latinos, it is the second-leading cause of death behind cancer. Let’s use #SaludTues on Feb. 25, 2020, to tweetchat about ways to promote heart health for Latinos and all people! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Healthy Hearts: Celebrating American Heart Month!” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: The Heart Truth (@TheHeartTruth), Public Health Maps (@PublicHealthMap), U.S. Department of Health and Humans Services' Region 2 ...

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How Vital is Affordable Housing for Single Latino Parents and Kids


Sad mother no affordable housing evicted eviction home

The number of children living in single-parent households has grown significantly over the past 50 years. In fact, it has actually doubled — jumping from 13% to 32% in 2017, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of US Census Bureau data. High cost-of-living, including necessities such as food and transportation, can significantly impact single parents. Worse, it can prohibit their ability to break cycles of poverty or build substantial wealth. Single Latino Parents In the US, there about half of each sing-parent race group are white, roughly 15% are Black, about one-fourth are Latino/Hispanic, and a small share are Asian. "These gaps are driven largely by racial differences among the large share of solo parents who are mothers," Gretchen Livingston with PEW ...

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