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Pramod Sukumaran

Sukumaran completed a PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology and an MPH in Population Health Analytics. He curates content for Salud America! on family support and health projects at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio. His emphases is on the latest research, reports and resources related to various disease and policies, to improve Latino health.


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Articles by Pramod Sukumaran

Can Raising Smoking Age to 21 Reduce Smoking Rates Among Young Latinos?


21 smoking age San Antonio

Rules on the age for smoking cigarettes are tightening up across the nation. Texas (19.6% Latino) legislators have taken a significant step in this issue — passing legislation that will raise the legal minimum age to purchase cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and other goods to 21. Gov. Greg Abbott signed Senate Bill 21 into law earlier this month and will go into effect on September 1. Government officials and medical professionals hope passing tobacco 21 bills across the country will make significant shifts in addiction rates. “Any teen using any type of tobacco product or e-cigarette raises their harm from zero to a level that is unacceptable,” Jeffrey Hardesty, research program manager at Johns Hopkins University’s Institute for Global Tobacco Control, told TIME. “Any ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/25: How to Address Alzheimer’s & Brain Health in Latinos


latino alzheimer's disease dementia tweetchat brain health

June marks Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month. This is a time to reflect on the many challenges and inequities facing people of color in the United States when it comes to Alzheimer's Disease and overall brain health. Sadly, U.S. Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than whites, studies show. Alcohol, sleep deprivation, and diabetes play a role in this gap. Worse, Latino caregivers can experience high levels of stress when supporting their family members with the disease. To understand and address these disparities, people must pay more attention to the role of the social determinants of health. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, June 25, 2019, to tweet about the latest research and beneficial strategies and programs to prevent and reduce ...

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New Affordable Housing Bill Aims to Add 1.9M Units Nationwide


Affordable Housing for Seniors- A Reality Check

A bipartisan effort led by Senators and Representatives alike proposes a new plan to help solve America's widespread lack of access to homeownership. The Affordable Housing Credit Improvement Act of 2019, also known as the Low Income Housing Tax Credit, would expand and strengthen the Affordable Housing Tax Credit. Senator Maria Cantwell introduced the bill on the Senate floor last week, urging fellow-legislators to act in this issue. "We know that this challenge of moving forward on affordable housing is something that is a bipartisan issue," Cantwell, one of the bill's sponsors, said. "The tax credit has had bipartisan support for many years in the United States Congress. We just need to put the pedal to the metal and provide more of the tax credit so we can get more ...

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Priced Out: How a Brilliant Cartoon Explains the Housing Crisis in San Francisco


characters from the priced out series on housing in san francisco

Media producers Joseph Smooke and Dyan Ruiz have seen the harsh impact of unaffordable housing on Latino families in San Francisco. Rents rise. Wages don't. Latinos get priced out of their homes—forced to move further away from health-promoting assets like jobs, transit, and medical care. Many people don't know why this happens, or what to do. Smooke and Ruiz, who created a media group to advocate for equitable public policies, wanted to empower families who face housing crises and build public demand for solutions. So they went to the drawing board—literally. San Francisco and Unaffordable Housing Looking for an affordable place to live in San Francisco is like searching for a needle in a haystack. Especially in places like the city's Mission District. The ...

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Can Taxing Empty Apartments Help the Affordable Housing Crisis?


Affordable Housing for Seniors- A Reality Check

Some houses, apartments, and other living spaces can remain unoccupied for most months in the year. Meanwhile, America faces a dilemma of affordable housing options. As government officials grapple with potential solutions that will ensure people can afford a physical home, one study suggests implementing an empty-house tax can change the housing crisis status quo. Cities that have implemented such legislation have seen positive results in their economy and rates of unoccupied homes. “Housing prices are impacted by supply, and if there are thousands of homes that sit unused, even a fraction of that becoming available will have a real impact on prices,” Alex Tran, Housing Community Development Commissioner of San Jose told the San Jose Spotlight. “We are looking at these ...

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Redlining Is Illegal, But It’s Still Hurting Latino Families


redlining map of new orleans housing

Historically, white people easily got mortgages to live in America's nicest areas, while aspiring racial/ethnic home buyers from the inner-city were refused loans from banks and federal programs. That is what is called "redlining." This racially discriminatory mortgage lending practice, which gripped the nation in the 1930s before its ban in the 1960s, created a racial wealth gap and neighborhoods that lacked health-promoting assets, like healthcare, jobs, and transportation options. Even today, three of four neighborhoods “redlined” on government maps 80 years ago continuing to struggle economically, according to a new study, Washington Post reports. “It’s as if some of these places have been trapped in the past, locking neighborhoods into concentrated poverty,” ...

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How Affordable Housing Influences and is Influenced by Climate Change


Affordable Housing and Climate Change

The threats posed by climate change are growing every day, and they threaten severe impacts on public health, society, and housing. As climate change causes more powerful storms like Hurricane Harvey with increased frequency and intensity, housing developers are increasingly interested in disaster resilience. How Climate change affect housing? Some of America's most significant cities face the highest risks, as most are near a coast. Worse, these urban hubs contain high populations, capital assets, and ports that influence the national economy. Protecting the nation and the world's most populated areas should be at the forefront of every government official's mind in the immediate future. Recently published assessments of Califonia cities' carbon footprint found that, for ...

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New Report: Housing Prices Outpacing the Rate of Wage Growth


Home Prices are Rising at Twice the Rate of Wage Growth- New Report

Nearly two-thirds of renters nationwide say they can’t afford to buy a home. According to ATTOM Data Solutions' latest Rental Affordability Report, home prices are rising at twice the rate of wage growth. “With rental affordability outpacing home affordability in the majority of U.S. housing markets, and home prices rising faster than rental rates, the American dream of owning a home, maybe just that — a dream,” ATTOM Data Solutions Director of Content Jennifer von Pohlmann told HousingWire. April marked the 10th consecutive month with year-over-year declines, according to the report, contributing to a positive outlook for the housing market. Despite a slight uptick in July, last year saw the lowest number of foreclosures since 2005. Last month, year-over-year ...

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Latinos Diabetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations


Latinos Daibetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations Than Whites

Diabetes development can lead to numerous life-changing complications when the disease spirals out of control, including the amputation of limbs. As the prevalence of the illness continues to rise––30 million Americans are estimated to have diabetes––black and Latino patients are more likely to have an amputation compared to non-Hispanic whites, CNN reports. Diabetic foot complications exact a substantial clinical and economic toll in acute care settings, particularly among the rural and working poor. The Centers for Disease Control reports that in 2014, an estimated 29.1 million adults in the United States, or 9.3% of the adult population, had diabetes. In California (39.1% Latino), minority groups were more than twice as likely as whites to undergo amputations, ...

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