What Parents Should Know: Children Ages 5 to 11 Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine


What Parents Should Know: Children Ages 5 to 11 Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine

On Oct. 29, 2021, the FDA authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use for children ages 5 to 11. It had previously been approved for those ages 12 and older. The move will make the vaccine available to 28 million children in this age group. Getting children vaccinated is vital for controlling the spread of the pandemic, especially as many schools have returned to in-person learning. Do you have questions about the Pfizer vaccine and want to know more before your children get vaccinated? Here’s what Latino parents should know. Update 1/19/22: Greater than COVID shared new videos in English and Spanish featuring doctors answering questions about the COVID-19 vaccines for kids 5-11. Is the vaccine safe for children? Why was it produced so ...

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Take a Survey: Latinos, How Has COVID-19 Impacted You?



The Rutgers Community Health Justice Lab is inviting Latinos to complete this brief anonymous survey to understand the long-term impacts of COVID-19 on Latino health. The survey, which takes 45 minutes to complete, is available in Spanish and English. You can also enter a raffle for one of five $100 gift cards. "Understanding how Hispanics and Latinos have been impacted by the COVID pandemic is critical to guide efforts in reducing health inequity," according to survey creators Pamela Valera and Humberto Baquerizo and their team at Rutgers University. Why Latinos Should Participate in this COVID-19 Survey? COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted the Latino community. COVID-19 pandemic is worsening historical inequities among racial/ethnic minorities. “This is robbing ...

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What Is Infectious Disease and Why Should Latinos Care?


Infectious Disease Latinos Care

The term “infectious disease” covers a wide range of harmful illnesses. Influenza, chickenpox, and COVID-19 are some infectious diseases caused by germs or viruses that sicken people and can spread to others. Latinos face a heavier burden than their peers for several infectious diseases, from HIV/AIDS to coronavirus to tuberculosis. Fortunately, we can each do our part to prevent infectious disease — including learning more about them. “Infectious disease may be an unavoidable fact of life, but there are many strategies available to help us protect ourselves from infection and to treat a disease once it has developed,” according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. What is Infectious Disease? The kinds of organisms that can transmit infectious ...

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4 Compelling Communication Strategies to Build COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence


4 Compelling Communication Strategies to Build COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread, public health experts are focusing on addressing concerns with vaccine efficacy and safety for those who remain hesitant. That’s why the Societal Experts Action Network (SEAN) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has put together a toolkit of communication strategies for people who are unsure about the vaccine, parents who are thinking of vaccinating their children, and strategies for engaging with specific communities, such as Latinos. “In a rapidly evolving situation, where new evidence is continually emerging, state and local decision makers must be ready to frequently adjust and adapt their communication and messaging strategies to meet public needs,” write the authors of the toolkit, Emily Brunson, ...

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5 Things to Know About Día de los Muertos



Día de los Muertos, also known as Day of the Dead, is a lively annual Mexican holiday that celebrates friends and family members who have passed away.  Characterized by vibrant parades, singing, traditional dress and costumes, and altar building, Día de los Muertos brings unity between the living and returning spirits. “This indigenous holiday from Mexico celebrates the loving connection between the living and our departed loved ones that is so deeply missing in Western culture,” said Aya de Leon, a Puerto Rican novelist and Berkley professor, as reported by San Antonio Express News.  For Día de los Muertos, our team at Salud America! is honored to remember the loved ones we’ve lost from COVID-19 and other conditions, and protect the health of our living familia. 1. ...

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Latino ‘Excess Deaths’ Far Exceed Initial Estimates during COVID-19 Pandemic


Latino Excess Deaths COVID-19 Pandemic

Annually, CDC researchers compile and analyze data to predict the number of deaths that will occur in the coming year. The number of mortalities that go over this initial estimate, or “the difference between the observed numbers of deaths in specific time periods and expected numbers of deaths in the same time periods,” are known as excess deaths. Looking at deaths in 2020 compared with predicted deaths, researchers found that U.S. Latinos suffered double the excess deaths per 100,000 people than their white peers. “There were profound racial/ethnic disparities in excess deaths in the United States in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in rapid increases in racial/ethnic disparities in all-cause mortality between 2019 and 2020,” according to an October 2021 ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 38: “How to Empathetically Discuss the COVID-19 Vaccine”


Salud Talks 38

The COVID-19 vaccine is a contentious topic for many Latinos and Americans. The divide between those who are vaccinated and those who are unsure or don’t want to get the shot grows wider every day. But we can use compassion and cultural relevancy when promoting vaccine benefits with our loved ones who are unsure about the shot, according to two medical experts, Claudia Pineda, a physician assistant in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Dr. Katya Corado, a researcher with The Lundquist Institute. Listen to Claudia Pineda and Katy Corado in the newest Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 38, “How to Empathetically Discuss the COVID-19 Vaccine,” to learn how to have better conversations about COVID-19 vaccination! LISTEN! WHAT: A #SaludTalks Podcast discussion about the COVID-19 vaccine and ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 37: “COVID-19 and Health Disparities Impacting Latinos”


ST Episode 37

Health disparities have impacted Latinos for many years. Worse, the COVID-19 pandemic only worsened these inequities. Still, these issues have gained national attention, and, hopefully, spur action, change. Recently, experts from the National Institutes of Health and UT Health San Antonio joined our Salud Talks podcast to discuss the COVID-19, health inequities, and the struggles Latinos face in the US today. Listen to the Salud Talks Podcast, Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 37: “COVID-19 and Health Disparities Impacting Latinos,” as we dive into the health inequities affecting Latinos during the pandemic with two celebrated medical experts! listen! WHAT: A #SaludTalks discussion about the COVID-19, historic health disparities, and how these factors have impacted the ...

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Pregnant Latinas Have Low COVID-19 Vaccination Rates


Doctor giving COVID -19 coronavirus vaccine injection to pregnant woman. Doctor Wearing Blue Gloves Vaccinating Young Pregnant Woman In Clinic. People vaccination concept.

Pregnant Latinas have some of the lowest vaccination rates against COVID-19 compared to other ethnic/racial groups, according to a report from the CDC. The disparity is likely due to less culturally competent and accessible healthcare in communities of color, as well as vaccine misinformation about fertility and pregnancy. The CDC encourages all people who are eligible to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and that pregnancy should not be a barrier. “COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people 12 years and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future,” according to the CDC’s website. With more culturally relevant resources regarding vaccine safety for fertility and pregnancy, vaccine ...

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