Why are Other Nations Outperforming America on Health Outcomes?


Why are Other Nations Outperforming America on Health Outcomes

Spending on health is rising in America. Yet, ironically, health outcomes are getting worse. In fact, people here experience the worst health outcomes overall of any high-income nation. U.S. residents are more likely to die younger, and from avoidable causes, than residents of peer countries, according to a 2023 report from The Commonwealth Fund. Let’s compare health outcomes with peer countries to provide an important baseline for where we are in health outcomes and set a target for where we could be. The U.S. and 5 Important Domains of Healthcare Systems A 2021 study by The Commonwealth Fund compared five performance domains of health care systems across 11 high-income countries. Researchers found the U.S. ranks last on four of five domains: access to care (last) ...

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How Does Vision Rehabilitation Work for Latinos?



The National Eye Institute has provided educational tools and resources in both English and Spanish that focus on vision rehabilitation.   Let’s explore these resources and how they can be beneficial for Latinos.   What is Vision Rehabilitation?   Millions of people in the United States are living with visual impairments like blindness, glaucoma, cataracts, and other vision problems.   “A visual impairment can make it hard to do everyday activities like driving or reading,” according to the National Eye Institue. “A visual impairment can’t be fixed with glasses, contacts, or other standard treatments like medicine or surgery.”  Vision rehabilitation can help make the most of the vision you have and improve quality of life.   There are lots of different ...

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How Latinos Can Identify Strokes with RÁPIDO



A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts.  Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke.   Many know the acronym FAST that helps identify a stroke – F (face drooping), A (arm weakness), S (speech), and T (time to call 911) – and can spur quick action to save lives.   What can those who speak Spanish use? What does strokes in the Latino community look like?   Using RÁPIDO to Identify a Stroke    While the FAST acronym can be helpful in spotting a stroke, it doesn't translate well in Spanish.  In fact, just 58% of Latino adults in the U.S. can recognize stroke signs, compared to 64% of Black adults and 71% of white adults, according to a CDC ...

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What Latinos with Diabetes Should Consider When Enrolling in Medicare 



Did you know that 1 in 10 Latino have been diagnosed diabetes?   In fact, the rate of diabetes is higher among Latinos (11.8%) than Whites (7.4%) and Asians (9.5%), according to CDC data.   This is problematic because the disease takes a harsh physical toll, from vision loss to amputation and death, and a big healthcare toll, costing $237 billion in direct medical costs and $90 billion in lost productivity.  For Latinos who have diabetes, having health insurance is critical to managing the disease.   Let’s explore the state of diabetes among Latinos and what to consider when choosing a Medicare plan to help manage the disease.   Latinos and Diabetes Risk   If you’re a Latino adult, your lifetime chance of developing diabetes is over 50%, and you’re likely to ...

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Hispanic Heritage Month: Todos Somos, Somos Uno



By Dr. Fátima Coronado CDC, Salud America! Guest Blogger Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15) is a time to recognize and honor the Hispanic and Latino community’s achievements, culture, and contributions to the nation’s history. It’s an occasion to highlight the positive influence of Hispanics and Latinos throughout the country’s history. This year we take the opportunity to recognize that our country is stronger, healthier, and safer when we recognize our shared humanity and value every individual and community: Todos Somos, Somos Uno: We Are All, We Are One. As the US population becomes more diverse, Hispanic Heritage Month offers a valuable opportunity to foster cross-cultural understanding and appreciation, break down stereotypes, and promote ...

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How Often Should Patients Be Screened for Social Needs?


how often to screen for social needs

As more healthcare systems consider implementing a social determinants of health (SDoH) screening program to care for patients’ non-medical needs, we at Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio are sharing important tips in developing such a program. Today, we’re highlighting how often patients should be screened for social needs. While there is no evidence-based gold standard for how often screening should be conducted, lived experiences from clinics that have successfully implemented a SDoH screening program can help healthcare facilities make critical decisions in designing their own screening program. Let’s explore the lived experiences of several of these clinics today! Considerations in Determining Screening Frequency Initially, it may seem most effective to ...

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Medicare: What Latinos Should Know



Medicare can be a complex topic for anyone.   Getting health insurance coverage through Medicare has many moving parts, from knowing where to start, to searching through plans, to choosing the right plan for you.   Let's dive into Medicare and a few helpful tips to consider when choosing your plan.   What is Medicare?   Medicare is the federal health insurance program for people who are 65 or older, regardless of income, medical history, or health status.   The program also covers certain younger people with disabilities and people with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD; permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant).   “Medicare plays a key role in providing health and financial security to 60 million older people and younger people with ...

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Serving the Medically Underserved: Guadalupe Clinic Brings Goodwill to Wichita Latinos


Guadalupe Clinic patient

The drive to Guadalupe Clinic from rural Coffeyville, Kansas, was just over two hours, but it felt like a lifetime for the Pascual family. As their older vehicle putted along the back roads, the Pascuals anxiously awaited much-needed medical care. With no health insurance and limited income, getting basic healthcare was a constant struggle. Finally, the family’s car turned onto St. Francis Street in downtown Wichita, Kansas. Their destination was nestled between two scrap metal yards and surrounded by railroads and small housing lots. Pulling into the parking lot, the Pascuals breathed a sigh of relief. They had safely reached the Guadalupe Clinic and were welcomed with open arms – no questions asked. For families like the Pascuals, Guadalupe Clinic in Wichita, ...

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Watch Webinar: How to Systemically Address Social Needs in Healthcare Settings



Latinos face inequities in social determinants of health (SDoH), from housing to healthcare, making it harder to achieve health equity. Watch the UT Health San Antonio webinar — “How to Systemically Address Social Needs in Healthcare Settings” — which was held at 11 a.m. CST on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2023, to explore how healthcare settings can care for patients' medical and SDoH needs. Panelists from UT Health San Antonio, Nemours Children's Health, HOPE Clinic in Houston, the American Cancer Society, and Genentech unpacked SDoH screening, a strategy that clinics, hospitals, and healthcare systems can use to check patients for social needs and connect them to needed resources. This is a part of a webinar of a series, “Let’s Address Health Equity Together.” The ...

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