#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/28: How to Prevent Skin Cancer in Communities of Color


sunscreen apply to prevent skin cancer latino hispanic girl

Summer is here. Unfortunately, so is skin cancer risk. Too much unprotected exposure to the sun can give you more than a sun burn. Rates of melanoma—the most dangerous form of skin cancer—have skyrocketed in recent years. This rise is happening even among Latinos and other dark-skinned populations. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, May 28, 2019, to share strategies to improve the prevention of skin cancer among Latinos and all people: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How to Prevent Skin Cancer in Communities of Color” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, May 28, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (@CDC_Cancer); the American Academy of Dermatology ...

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Dr. Amelie Ramirez to Chair New Department of Population Health Sciences at UT Health San Antonio


Amelie Ramirez Latino Health Champion 2018

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at the the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio and a leading health disparities researcher, has been named chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, announced Dr. Robert Hromas, dean of the Long School of Medicine. The appointment is effective June 1. Dr. Hromas also announced that the department will be renamed the Department of Population Health Sciences. The new department will continue to provide services in all biological and medical analytical areas. It will also focus on efforts to use analytical tools to enhance the health of the unique populations in San Antonio and South Texas. Dr. Ramirez will continue to serve as director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research, ...

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Erika Zamarripa: Learning to Live After Breast Cancer


Erika Zamarripa breast cancer survivor San Antonio

By Erika Zamarripa San Antonio Cancer Survivor There is that "C" word again. Cancer can be defined as a "disease caused by an uncontrolled division of abnormal cells in a part of the body." Or it also can be defined as a "practice or phenomenon perceived to be evil or destructive and hard to contain or eradicate." Whatever you want to call it, it sucks. I was diagnosed with Stage 2 ER positive breast cancer at the age of 32 on Dec. 18, 2013. My twin boys were only 9 years old at the time and I was working at H-E-B Pharmacy. I remember one day taking a shower and I felt a lump on my breast. This lump hurt when I touched it and the longer, I felt it, the more I started to worry. I called my gynecologist and made an appointment. He felt it and sent me for a mammogram and an ...

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Latinos Diabetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations


Latinos Daibetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations Than Whites

Diabetes development can lead to numerous life-changing complications when the disease spirals out of control, including the amputation of limbs. As the prevalence of the illness continues to rise––30 million Americans are estimated to have diabetes––black and Latino patients are more likely to have an amputation compared to non-Hispanic whites, CNN reports. Diabetic foot complications exact a substantial clinical and economic toll in acute care settings, particularly among the rural and working poor. The Centers for Disease Control reports that in 2014, an estimated 29.1 million adults in the United States, or 9.3% of the adult population, had diabetes. In California (39.1% Latino), minority groups were more than twice as likely as whites to undergo amputations, ...

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Medicare’s ‘What’s Covered’ Mobile App Now in Spanish


Medicare what's covered app

U.S. Latinos are at higher risk for diabetes, obesity, and other health conditions than their White peers. Yet they face many barriers in accessing Medicare and other healthcare coverage. A new app can help these Latinos. Medicare's first and only app, “What’s covered,” is now available in English or Spanish. The app delivers accurate cost, coverage, and eligibility details for Original Medicare Part A and Part B items and services. The app is free on both the App Store and Google Play. To download the app in Spanish, just search for “Qué está cubierto.” What Can the App Do? Medicare's new app takes some of the most popular information from the Medicare website. It ensures beneficiaries have personalized, accessible guidance to make informed decisions about their ...

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8 Unconventional Ways to Celebrate Cinco de Mayo


diverse group volunteering for environmental clean up

What are you doing for Cinco de Mayo? Many will use it as an excuse to party with margaritas and tacos. We at Salud America! invite you to think outside the box and celebrate Cinco de Mayo in one of six unconventional ways. 1. Find Out What Cinco de Mayo Really Means Cinco de Mayo ("Fifth of May") does not celebrate Mexico's Independence Day. Mexico won independence on Sept. 16, 1810. Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican Army's unlikely victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla, on May 5, 1862, under the leadership of General Ignacio Zaragoza. Still, it has evolved into an observance of Mexican heritage. "In the 1950s, Chicano activists turned Cinco de Mayo into a commemorative holiday used to educate Mexican Americans about their cultural heritage," ...

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Addressing the Social Determinants of Brain Health


Latino Alzheimer's Disease and dementia

By Jason Resendez and Stephanie Monroe UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Alzheimer’s Disease Disparities Engagement Network This month is National Minority Health Month and across the country communities are reflecting on the numerous challenges and injustices people of color face when it comes to healthcare in the U.S. For example, African Americans and Latinos face a higher risk for some of our country’s most common health problems, including obesity, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure, stroke, Alzheimer’s and other dementias. To understand and address these disparities, greater attention must be paid to the role of the social determinants of health like income inequality, housing and food security, and educational opportunity. We know that this approach ...

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The CHANGE Act on Alzheimer’s: How Will It Impact Latinos?


nurse with hispanic latino older couple diabetes pancreatic cancer

The U.S. burden of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia will more than double within 50 years, and Latinos will suffer the biggest rise, according to the CDC. Alzheimer’s is the only top-10 cause of death without an effective treatment or cure. However, new legislation is targeting this rising crisis. The CHANGE Act The CHANGE Act takes a targeted approach to addressing our nation’s Alzheimer’s crisis by encouraging early detection, diagnosis, and access to interventions, according to UsAgainstAlzheimer's. The CHANGE Act was introduced by eight U.S. Senators, including two Latinos, Robert Menendez (D-NJ) and Linda Sanchez (D-CA). Some of the senators are Republican, some Democrat. The latest emerging science indicates that proactive, risk-modifying measures exist ...

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9 Strategies to Improve Intersection of Transportation and Dialysis


William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says.

Chronic kidney disease is a crisis in the U.S. — yet, the intersection of transportation and healthcare is failing. Public transportation agencies, healthcare providers, and patients are concerned about the rising demand, cost of providing dialysis trips for patients with the illness. Of the forms of dialysis transportation, ambulance rides only make up 5% of trips in the US. However, they account for half of the $3 billion spent annually on dialysis transportation, according to a 2013 study in the Journal of Health Economics and Outcomes Research. Costs could be reduced by one-third if ambulance use dropped to 1% of trips. Gathering Needed Data Before policy could change, all parties involved needed to know the lay of the land. In 2016, researchers with Cooperative ...

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