Help Stop Weight Bias for Obesity Care Week 2021!


obesity care week bicycle rider latino man

Obesity Care Week 2021 (#OCW2021) is here! From Feb. 28 to March 6, 2021, our Salud America! Latino health equity team at UT Health San Antonio, is happy to be an OCW2021 Champion to support this awareness week. Obesity Care Week is an annual public awareness effort to end weight bias, as well as raise awareness, educate and advocate for a better world for people living with obesity. Salud America! research shows that U.S. Latinos face health inequities in many areas—from poverty and social support to access to affordable housing and transit—that contribute to higher rates of obesity. Latino adults have higher obesity rates than their white peers (47% and 37.9%), as do Latino children (20.7% and 11.7%). This, in turn, leads to disparities in diabetes and risk for COVID-19 and ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/2: The Chronic Wound of Health Inequity


crowd chronic wound tweetchat

You might know that health inequities, such as a lack of access to health care, housing, or transportation, prevent Latinos and other people of color from getting a fair opportunity to live their healthiest. These inequities can cut deeply, and for a long time. Some experts compare these inequities to a “chronic wound” that doesn’t heal in a timely or expected way, with both little progress and many long-term health consequences. Let’s use #SaludTues on Feb. 2, 2021, to tweet about how advocates, planners, and other leaders can take action to solve the chronic wound of health inequities! WHERE: Twitter WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “The Chronic Wound of Health Inequities” WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021 HOST: Salud America! at UT ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 1/19: What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?



January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Each year, more than 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States. This cancer is hurting communities of color, with Latinas being at a high risk of being diagnosed. But cervical cancer is preventable. Stopping cervical cancer for all communities means education about the causes, prevention, and treatment of HPV and cervical cancer. Join #SaludTues on Jan. 19, 2021, at 1:00 PM EST to tweet about what we can do to stop cervical cancer. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?” DATE: Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2020 TIME: 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. PST) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Cervivor (@IamCervivor), ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/27: How to Reduce Breast Cancer and Improve Survivorship among Latinas


breast cancer prevention latinas diverse women tweetchat

Breast cancer doesn’t impact every women the same. Among Latinas, breast cancer is the No. 1 cancer killer. Many Latinas face unique survivorship journeys, shaped by cultural and spiritual beliefs and struggles with barriers to care, screening, patient-doctor communication, and other social determinants of health. To recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October), let’s use #SaludTues on Oct. 27, 2020, to tweet about the latest progress in Latina breast cancer data and research, the importance of breast cancer screening, and tips and stories for prevention and survivorship! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “How to Reduce Breast Cancer and Improve Survivorship among Latinas” WHERE: Twitter WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020 HOST: Salud ...

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Report: 1 in 5 U.S. Latino, Black Children Have Obesity


two girls in class school physical activity to fight obesity

Children of color continue to struggle with obesity. Obesity rate continues to be significantly higher for Latino (20.7%) and black children (22.9%) than for white children (11.7%) ages 10-17, according to the new State of Childhood Obesity report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Obesity—and other chronic diseases—are more prevalent among those of color and those in poverty because discriminatory systems have disinvested in healthy policies and basic resources for them. In the midst of the current COVID-19 pandemic, which is worsened by obesity, it is more critical than ever to prioritize children’s health. Latino children and young adults account for over 40% of the COVID-19 deaths among people ages 0-24, according to the CDC. To prioritize children’s ...

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Let’s ‘Anchor It’ to Protect Kids from Deadly Tip-Overs



Many families are staying home more than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But only about 80% of parents realize that furniture tip-overs can lead to injuries and death among children. Only about half have safety anchored a TV or furniture at home, according to a recent survey by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which created the Anchor It! safety campaign. Parents who did not anchor said they didn't think it was needed, as long as they were watching the kids. That's why Anchor It! has a new English and Spanish video, "Even When You're Watching," to help parents understand the dangers of furniture tip-overs. "[The video] contains real-life footage that vividly demonstrates just how quickly a tip-over can happen, even when parents are in the same room watching ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 9/15─Hear Her: Preventing Pregnancy-related Deaths


Latina hispanic mother pregnant baby health motherhood infant tweetchat hear her

Every woman’s health matters. A pregnancy can bring potential complications to both mother and child. Some risks are worse for Latinas and other mothers of color. That’s why the CDC’s new campaign, “Hear Her,” encourages all women to know how to prevent maternal mortality, and share their concerns with their health care provider. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, to tweet about the importance of CDC’s new campaign and maternal health, especially for Latinas in honor of the launch of Hispanic Heritage Month (9/15 to 10/15)! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “Hear Her: Preventing Pregnancy-related Deaths” WHERE: Twitter WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020 HOST: Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio (@SaludAmerica) ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/23: Telehealth for Underserved Communities During COVID-19


#SaludTues Telehealth for underserved communities

To minimize exposure to and transmission of COVID-19, providers have rapidly transitioned to telehealth to care for patients at a distance. However, there is an absence of best practices and necessary infrastructure to expand telehealth services, particularly in underserved and Latino communities. Latinos are particularly vulnerable to this disruption in care for many reasons, such as: they have highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S.; they are less likely to have a usual source of health care; they face barriers related to differences in culture, language and beliefs; they are less likely to have broadband subscription than whites; and they face higher rates of COVID-19 due to their jobs in the service industry. Join #SaludTues on June ...

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Cancer Patients with COVID-19 at Higher Risk of Death (for Unexpected Reasons)


Cancer Patients with COVID-19 at Higher Risk of Death for Unexpected Reasons

Cancer patients who get COVID-19 have a 13% risk of dying, much higher than the 6% death rate of coronavirus in the general population, according to a study published in The Lancet. But the reasons for bigger risk aren't what researchers expected. Pregnant women or people with autoimmune diseases or blood cancers are, surprisingly, not more susceptible to severe coronavirus, USA Today reports. Instead, people with cancer and the general population have the same basic reasons for severe coronavirus outcomes. These include older age, smoking, and underlying health problems like diabetes and obesity, according to the new study. This suggests cancer still poses a greater danger than the virus. "Many cancer treatments do not weaken the immune system to a level that it could not ...

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