Drug Overdose Deaths During COVID-19: A Historical Spike Among Latinos?


COVID-19 Mental Health Latinos Impacts

More Americans have died from a drug overdose in the last 12 months than at any other point in history. New research has found a historical 21% spike in drug overdose deaths amid COVID-19. This data comes during a pandemic that has disproportionately affected Latinos — moreover, it's worsening already harsh historical inequities this group faces. One of those disparities is a higher rate of drug use among people of color. “Unfortunately, opioid-related deaths have reversed the trend we saw in 2018 and 2019, and COVID-19 is largely responsible,” Steven J. Martin, the dean and a professor at Ohio Northern University Rudolph H. Raabe College of Pharmacy, told General Surgery News. “All health care professionals should provide basic screening for persons suffering from drug ...

Read More

Cheryl Aguilar: Providing Mental Health Support to Families with Immigration Trauma



Immigration is difficult and often traumatic. People who immigrate to the U.S. often face a dangerous journey only to be met with aggression and xenophobia at the border. It can lead to loss of hope, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Cheryl Aguilar wants to help families experiencing the trauma of immigration and adjusting to new life in the U.S. Aguilar immigrated from Honduras as a teenager, an experience that helped guide her to give back to immigrant communities. Aguilar is a clinical social worker and founding director and therapist at the Hope Center for Wellness. “As a therapist, one of the things that I do is help individuals, families, and communities heal from whatever distress, trauma, or experiences they might have encountered. I believe in holistic healing, ...

Read More

How Texas is Tackling Alzheimer’s Disease Care


Texas State Health Tackles Alzheimer Disease Care

Alzheimer’s disease is an illness that affects the lives of many, and it impacts some Americans more than others.  In fact, studies show that U.S. Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer's than their White peers. That number is only going to get worse over time if dedicated action isn't taken.  The number of Latinos living with Alzheimer’s is projected to grow from 430,000 in 2014 to 3.2 million in 2060. That is more than an alarming seven-fold increase. Yet Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research across the board. Fortunately, Texas officials and researchers are working on this issue. How Big a Problem is Alzheimer's Disease in Texas and Among Latinos? The problem is huge in Texas, according to the experts. "In Texas in 2019 alone, 1650 ...

Read More

Latino Participation Vital in Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials


Latino Alzheimer Clinical Trials

Across the board, Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research. Without adequate Latino and minority representation in clinical trials, researchers cannot find differential effects among groups nor advance public health and medicine. To address this, researchers across the country, like those at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, are creating educational interventions to recruit certain racial/ethnic groups in diseases like Alzheimer's that are on the rise among minorities. "Studies should represent the demographics of the country," Dr. Jonca Bull, an assistant commissioner on minority health at the Food and Drug Administration, said in a recent statement. "We need to close that gap so we can better ...

Read More

Study: Latino LGBTQ Youth at High Risk for Suicide


Latino LGBTQ Suicide

Latino LGBTQ youth are 30% more likely to attempt suicide than non-Latino LGBTQ youth, according to a new study by the Trevor Project, a non-profit focused on suicide prevention for LGBTQ youth. Part of the reason is the stress-related stigma, discrimination, and difficulties expressing gender and sexual identity, which many LGBTQ people of color face. But, unfortunately, Latino LGBTQ youth also often deal with the stress of immigration, which can take a heavy toll on a person’s mental health. “The higher risk of attempting suicide among Latinx LGBTQ youth compared to non-Latinx LGBTQ youth can be explained by greater worries about themselves or family being detained or deported due to immigration policies,” according to the Trevor Project. LGBTQ and Mental Health Members ...

Read More

#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/6: Let’s Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Our Abuelos and Abuelas, Like Coco


coco theme tweetchat on alzheimer's for abuelos for hispanic heritage month

Just like in the movie Coco, our abuelos and abuelas are more susceptible to Alzheimer's Disease. Studies suggest that Latinos in the United States are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than white non-Latinos. This is because of genetics, lifestyle, socioeconomic risk, and other factors, even amid the coronavirus pandemic. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, to tweet about how we can prevent dementia and Alzheimer's in our abuelos and abuelas, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month. WHAT: #SaludTues: Let’s Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Our Abuelos and Abuelas, Like Coco TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST (Noon-1 p.m. CST), Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS:@UsA2_Latinos ...

Read More

Why a Large Scale Alzheimer’s Study is Critical for Latinos


Large Scale Alzheimer Study Latinos

Among the countless disparities Latinos face, the way in which people's brains age might differ based on their race. That is what researchers at University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth will study after reciving increased funding for large-scale Alzheimer's biomarker study from the National Institute of Health (NIH). Mainly, they will be looking into health gaps in brains aging between Mexican Americans compared to their white peers. "To successfully battle and ultimately prevent or treat a complex disease such as Alzheimer's, we need to understand how this disease and other forms of dementia affect our nation's diverse communities differently," Dr. Eliezer Masliah, director of the NIA Division of Neuroscience, said in a press release. This award was made ...

Read More

#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/30: How Coronavirus Impacts People with Dementia


dementia alzheimers people walking tweetchat slaudtues

Many data suggests that older adults are the most vulnerable to the worst effects of the coronavirus outbreak. We still have a lot to understand about dementia and risk for COVID-19. Evidence seems to indicate dementia-related behaviors, increased age, and common health conditions may increase risk. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, June 30, 2020, to tweet about the latest research about dementia and coronavirus! WHAT: #SaludTues: How Coronavirus Impacts People with Dementia TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST (Noon-1 p.m. CST), Tuesday, June 30, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: @UsA2_Latinos, @AlzheimersLA, @Diversealz, @DiverseElders @WellmedCharitab @CaregiverSOS @PublicHealthMap @VocesenSalud ADDITIONAL HASHTAGS: #COVID19, ...

Read More

7 Reasons Not Everyone Can Just Hop on a Telehealth Video Call


Address Equity in the Telehealth Revolution

Delaying medical care can cause catastrophic health and financial problems. That’s why early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services temporarily expanded its telehealth coverage so physicians, nurse practitioners, clinical psychologists and licensed clinical social workers would be reimbursed for telehealth services. Other payers followed suit. Unfortunately, not everyone can just hop on a telehealth video call. Many Latinos and other vulnerable populations—older people, people experiencing domestic violence, and families with low income—face insurance, language, health literacy, digital literacy, and digital access barriers to telehealth services. Moreover, telehealth can be challenging for people with autism, intellectual and developmental ...

Read More