How to Boost Your Mental Health Over the Holidays


Happy volunteer looking at donation box

Stressed-out and down this holiday season? You might have the "holiday blues." These are temporary feelings of depression associated with the extra stress, financial constraints, and unrealistic expectations of the season. These can harm long-term mental health. You might have "seasonal affective disorder." This is a seasonal depression that happens at the same time every year as the season change, such as the bleak wintertime months. These conditions are especially worrisome for people who suffer high rates of mental health issues. Latinos, for example, already face higher rates of depressive symptoms than many of their peers. Fewer Latinos than whites say their child had ever used mental health care services, according to a Salud America! research review. So what can you ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 12/18: Fortify Mental Health for the Holidays!


christmas holiday mental health depresssion

The holidays can be a season for family, friends, and festivities. But this time also can bring stress, anxiety, and depression. Financial and gift-giving burdens rise. The calendar gets jammed with travel, social gatherings, or loneliness for those who can’t meet with friends and family. This is bad news especially for Latino and other minority groups who already suffer higher rates of mental health issues than their peers. On Twitter, let's use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018, to share tips, stories, and resources to help Latino and all people manage and fortify their mental health and self-care this holiday season: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Fortify Mental Health for the Holidays” TIME / DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, 12/18/18 WHERE: On ...

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Minerva Perez Busts Fear, Builds Mental Health Support for Latino Immigrants



Fear. Of being deported. Losing homes. Losing children. Minvera Perez knows Latino immigrants live in constant fear in East Hampton, N.Y. (17.1% Latino), which stresses these parents and kids—not to mention harming their physical and mental health. Perez wanted to help. How could she overcome Latino families' grim fears and stresses, and ease their mental health burden? Levels of Fear Perez is executive director of Organizacion Latino-Americana of Eastern Long Island (OLA). OLA promotes cultural, social, economic, and educational development within Long Island’s East End Latino communities, specifically Suffolk County, N.Y. (19.5% Latino). Perez and OLA are speaking up for social justice for Latino immigrants. "Right now, Latino members in our community need ...

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7 Tips for Latinos to Start a Mental Health Journey



People these days are talking about mental health more than ever before, from real mothers to nonprofit groups to NBA stars to entire TV shows. But it's not always clear how to start your own mental health journey. This is especially unclear among Latinos, who face higher rates of depressive symptoms than many of their peers. And fewer Latinos (8%) than whites (14%) reported that their child had ever used mental health care services, according to a Salud America! research review. "If you’re just embarking on your mental health journey, it’s a scary and stressful time," writes Joe Rodriguez of remezcla.com. 6 Big Tips Rodriguez talked with Latina mental health activist Dior Vargas (formerly of Project UROK) and therapist Omar Torres to create a six-step guide to "help you ...

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Call for Help: Mental Health Helpline Coming to South Texas


Hope Famil Health Center mental health warm line

Struggling with behavioral or mental health issues? If you're in South Texas, there will soon be a phone number you can call to get help. Hope Family Health Center is starting a "Warm Line," a phone line that will connect callers to peers who have dealt with and overcome behavioral and mental health issues, The Monitor reports. "There may be somebody that will be going through a crisis or close to a crisis and need somebody to talk to and [they're] isolated and don’t want to call the hospital for help or don’t have the resource," Rebecca Stocker, leader of Hope Family Health Center in McAllen, told The Monitor. "They can call the warm line and speak with someone who has gone through something similar and help them build on their internal resources and move on." How 'Hope ...

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Making Mental Healthcare that Works for Latino Youth


austin child guidance center 2

Latinos comprise almost half of all youth in Austin, Texas. These kids are more likely than their peers to deal with mental health issues, from fear of being deported to bullying to financial stress, according to a Salud America! Research Review. And, sadly, these issues go largely untreated. One group—The Austin Child Guidance Center—took notice and is trying to make a positive change. “We’ve just been seeing a lot more fear and a general sense of unpredictability, which raises everybody’s anxiety level,” Julia Hoke, director of psychological services for the Austin Child Guidance Center, told the Austin American Statesman. “We want to be a counterpoint to that.” The Austin Child Guidance Center The center started a task force to meet the needs of their ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/26: How to Curb Underage Drinking Among Latinos



Despite claims that underage drinking may be on the decline, certain groups like Latino youth continue to be at a high risk for engaging in frequent binge drinking behaviors. Nearly 1 in 2 high school aged youth reported drinking, according to a report from Child Trends, and over 1 in 6 high school seniors had five or more drinks in less than a couple of hours (defined as binge drinking), according to the CDC. Underage drinking poses a number of threats to youth especially since their brains are still developing at this age. Communities of color are often targeted through aggressive marketing of alcoholic beverages and living near a high density of alcohol outlets. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, to tweet about ways to prevent binge drinking among high ...

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The Crisis and Stigma of Mental Health among Latinas


latino-kid mental health

More than 1 in 4 Latina high-schoolers have thought about committing suicide. Suicide attempts among Latina teenagers are at a higher rate than their non-Hispanic White female and Hispanic male peers, according to a Salud America! research review. That’s why it is important to explore the reasons why─and what to do about it. Latinas and Mental Health In the Latino community, mental health problems often are not spoken about. There is a stigma attached to it. Or people just don’t know enough about it, according to an article. That’s especially true for Latinas. “The expectations of what makes a ‘good’ Latina are often rooted in propriety and maintaining appearances, specifically when it involves something as personal as mental health or illness,” wrote Liz ...

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Study: Latinos Less Likely to Get Mental Health Care, Causing Missed Work



Latinos and blacks are more likely than whites to get the mental health services they need, and more likely to miss work as a result, according to a new study. The study, published by California-based Rand Corporation, found a relationship between untreated mental health problems and multiple absences from work. This has a big economic toll on Latino and black individuals and families, as multiple work absences usually mean lost pay or even lost jobs, reports California Healthline. The data shows that mental health problems caused 12% of blacks and 9.4% of Latino to miss four or more days of work a year, both higher rates than whites (7.9%). “This could have important repercussions for black [and Latino] Californians’ ability to earn income and stay employed in the face of ...

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