Target Aims to Simplify Clean, Healthy Shopping


Target clean label

In an effort to promote customer wellness and company transiency, Target retailers will add “clean” labeling to all products without commonly known harmful chemicals. This is another phase of the corporation’s “chemical goals,” or its plan to reduce customer exposure to hazardous substances in products on the shelves. Consumers strongly desire for transparency in their merchandise, said Christina Hennington, Target’s senior vice president and general merchandise manager of essentials, beauty, hardlines, and services. “Our guests are increasingly interested in better-for-you products, and by introducing Target Clean, we’re able to help them identify products that meet their needs and save time,” Hennington said in a statement. Latinos, who face chemical ...

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Plastic in Breast Implants Linked to Cancer Development


Breast implant issues

Last month, the FDA and health experts met to review renewed safety concerns about long-term side effects─even cancer─caused by breast augmentation. Women across the U.S. have spoken up about health complications that they believe were caused by their breast implants. Health professionals, too, are concerned about the growing number of people affected. Latinas get implants more than any other minority group. Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research in Washington, D.C., analyzed past breast augmentation studies and spoke at the FDA’s conference on her findings. “Implants are not so innocent as presented,” Dr. Howard Amital, an Israeli rheumatologist who has studied this issue, told the New York Times. “There is a reason for concern. There ...

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Kids Face Risk of Lead-Contaminated Drinking Water in Schools



Children across the U.S. acquire and education through public school — they also receive lead exposure, according to new research. At least 22 states failed to protect students from water contamination, according to a study conducted by the Environment America Research & Policy Center and U.S. PIRG Education Fund. Worse, only two of the 32 tested states received a B rating. Not one state made an A. Schools in states with large Latino populations also fared poorly. “It's concerning,” Julie Ma, a mother in Boston (19.4% Latino) who prepares water bottles for her kids every day, told CBS. “I really would like to get the lead out of the water supply as fast as possible for the students ... Many schools don't even know if they have it and haven't been able to make those ...

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Tell EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler: Keep Our Waters Clean!


EPA clean water act

The EPA recently proposed a revision of its Waters of the United States rule that intends to roll back clean water initiatives. The change─the so-called Trump “Dirty Water Rule”─could reduce the number of rivers and lakes regulated under the Clean Water Act. It would also result in 18% of streams and 51% of wetlands to no longer fall under the EPA’s protection, leaving millions of Americans vulnerable to polluted water, according to The U.S. Geological Survey. Water poverty, or a lack of a toilet, tub, shower, or running water, affects nearly 1.6 million Americans, according to U.S. census data. Latinos already face chemical exposure in water at home and on military bases. EPA wants your public comment on its proposed clean water rollback! Email EPA Chief Andrew ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 4/9: Harmful Chemicals in Consumer Products


Children furniture safety

Did you know many everyday products in your house contain harmful chemicals? Companies such as Johnson & Johnson, Claire’s, and Monsanto are all currently facing backlash over chemicals in their baby, cosmetic, and gardening products — which have reportedly caused severe health issues, such as cancer. Many people are urging stricter chemical regulation. But as government officials and companies grapple with product regulation, these chemicals cause intolerance and other health side effects that drastically impact the lives of consumers and commercial laborers. These health inequities can affect Latinos, who work with these products more frequently than other demographics. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, April 9, 2019, to share relevant information about how to ...

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Dust: The Tiny Cause of Big Weight Gain in Kids?


dust fat cells

Dust buildup in the home can lead to allergy issues and asthma attacks — now researchers are saying it can also lead to weight gain in children. A new study links over 100 chemicals found in dust to fat cell generation and development, or endocrine disrupters. This kind of linkage is uncharted territory, said Christopher Kassotis, research team lead and post-doctoral research associate at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, in a news release. "This is some of the first research investigating links between exposure to chemical mixtures present in the indoor environment and metabolic health of children living in those homes," Kassotis said. Latinos, who face chemical exposure at work and in the air they breathe, can also be subject to these adverse substances ...

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Latinos Breathe More Unclean Air Because of White Consumption


unclean air pollution

It is a proven fact that people of color inhale more hazardous pollution than whites. Worse, the consumption of products that cause unclean air is coming from the community least affected by this kind of pollution — whites, according to recent research. Latinos, the group most impacted, will breathe 63% more contaminated air than what their consumption produces. “Even though minorities are contributing less to the overall problem of air pollution, they are affected by it more,” Jason Hill,  study co-author, University of Minnesota engineering professor, and who is also white, told USA Today. “Is it fair [that] I create more pollution, and somebody else is disproportionately affected by it?” Air quality detrimentally affects Latinos in childhood diabetes, lung ...

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Tell EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler: Protect Our Families from Mercury Pollution!


Mercury air pollution rule

The EPA is proposing new rules that would roll back regulations for mercury air pollution, which disproportionately endangers the Latino community. Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), established in 2012, aimed to drastically decrease toxins produced by coal-burning power plants from polluting the atmosphere. These protections have reportedly resulted in averting heart attacks, asthma complications, and premature deaths by the thousands. Experts say the proposed rollback by EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler could boost levels of mercury, soot, and other hazardous pollution in our air, water, food, and communities. Fortunately, you can speak up! Send This Email Now to EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler! Dear EPA Chief Wheeler, I support current Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, which aim ...

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EPA Bans ‘Lethal’ Chemical in Consumer, But Not Commercial, Paint Strippers


EPA ban paint stripper

For the first time in 30 years, the EPA has updated section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) — moving to ban toxic chemicals in consumer paint-stripping products. The rule, released late last week, will prohibit online or retail sales of any paint stripping products containing these chemicals. Latino and environmental groups recently took legal action to spur the EPA toward action. Multiple groups, including Salud America!, informed the public about this issue. However, the EPA did not make final decisions on methylene chloride use in commercial paint removers. Nor did the agency address the use of alternative substances. Latinos, who face the most significant levels of chemical exposure through work, remain unprotected by the new ruling, some experts ...

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