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How the ‘Pandemic Child Hunger Prevention Act’ Could Help All U.S. Students Get Free School Meals



While the COVID-19 pandemic is making it harder for Latino and other families to get enough food to feed their families— called food insecurity—the new Pandemic Child Hunger Prevention Act could be a big help. The legislation, introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on July 30, would make all students eligible for free school lunch and breakfast during the 2020-2021 school year. Free school meals will be available to students during remote learning through "grab and go" or meal delivery. "The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics believes that school meals are as important to learning as textbooks and pencils," said Academy President Linda T. Farr, in a statement. "In the midst of uncertain school reopening plans as a result of the COVID-19 national emergency, the ...

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Farmer’s Markets Are Essential, Especially amid Coronavirus


example of farmers market amid covid-19 pandemic coronavirus face masks - from cuesa

Does your town have a farmers market? How is it operating amid COVID-19? Farmers markets are a path to healthy food access. They are especially important now as the coronavirus pandemic worsens food insecurity. Fortunately, the Farmers Market Coalition is stepping up to support farmers markets. They're pushing for federal aid for markets, creating resources, and sharing how markets increase access to healthy, fresh produce and social connections, and engage farmers in the local economy. “There are benefits to visiting a farmers’ market in light of coronavirus … you’re outside, there’s fresh air moving, and the supply chain is shorter,” Yvonne Michael, an epidemiologist at Drexel University, told WHYY. For National Farmers Market Week on Aug. 2-8, 2020, we at Salud ...

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Apply Now: $25,000 RWJF Culture of Health Prize



A culture of health is where everyone has a fair, just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. This also achieves health equity. Is your community creating a culture of health? If so, apply for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize! The contest provides $25,000 to communities that unite neighborhood, school, and business partners to improve health for all residents. Apply by Oct.15, 2020. Read about 2019 Winners Three largely Latino cities won three of five 2019 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prizes! Gonzales, Calif. (94% Latino), was chosen from nearly 200 applicants. Two other cities with large Latino populations—Lake County, Colo. (36% Latino) and Broward County, Fla. (30% Latino)—also won the health prize. ...

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3 New Ways to Fix Our Failed Approach to Speed Limits


3 New Ways to Fix Our Failed Approach to Speed Limits

American cities are failing at traffic safety—largely due to unsafe speeds. Urban arterials—roads that link major activity centers and highways—accounted for 29% of all U.S. fatal crashes between 2014 and 2018, despite making up only 6% of roadways. That’s why the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) developed City Limits, a framework for setting safe speed limits for city streets and providing strategies to manage speed. “Most speeds limits are set using an oversimplified and outdated method: measure 100 drivers traveling without any traffic and set the speed limit based on the 15th-fastest driver,” said Jenny O’Connell, NACTO Program Manager, according to a NACTO press release. “If this sounds like a system that would create ...

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As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, People of Color Face Uncertain Path


COVID-19 Vaccine People Color Uncertain

Many people are longing for an end to the turbulent COVID-19 pandemic. Thankfully, healthcare and government leaders are focusing their efforts and funding to develop a vaccine to halt transmission of the virus that has killed over 140,000 people in the U.S. A COVID-19 vaccine is a worthy goal, but leaders also must address one sad fact before any treatment is made available — the widespread disparity found among the racial makeup of those who are immunized and those who are not. "It's racial inequality — inequality in housing, inequality in employment, inequality in access to health care — that produced the underlying diseases," Dr. Dayna Bowen Matthew, dean of the George Washington University Law School—who has spent her career focusing on racial disparities in medical ...

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Tell USDA: Limit Added Sugars in Dietary Guidelines!


Latno boy drinking water no sugary drinks in us dietary guidelines

Submit a comment to support strong limits on added sugars and no sugary drinks for toddlers in the scientific report that will help shape the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. A federal committee released the scientific report on July 15, 2020, after spending months reviewing data and over 55,000 public comments—including some from Salud America! members. USDA and HHS will use the scientific report and comments to draft the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. You can comment on the report through Aug. 13, 2020. Marion Nestle, a nutrition researcher, told CNN that the report has "stronger recommendations" than past guidelines. This includes no sugary drinks for children up to age 2. "At the outset, I was concerned that the committee members might be ...

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Cities Need to Drastically Scale Up Contact Tracing to Slow Coronavirus Spread


Cities Need to Drastically Scale Up Contact Tracing to Slow Coronavirus Spread

For months now, health leaders have asked Americans to flatten the COVID-19 curve by behaving as if they have been exposed─stay home, stop hanging out with friends and family, avoid public places like gyms and bars, and wear a mask when around others. This individual behavior is needed to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. But, at the same time, public health departments must do their part, too. They are responsible for “contact tracing”─contacting people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and those in close contact with them to give them critical information to slow disease spread: understand the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they themselves do not feel ill; understand what they should do to monitor themselves for ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 7/21: Why Transit Needs to be Included in COVID-19 Recovery Plans


#SaludTues Why Transit Needs to Be Included in COVID-19 Recovery Plans

Millions of frontline workers continue to commute through the COVID-19 crisis and millions more will start back as businesses reopen. An estimated 2.8 million American workers in essential industries commute to work on transit. However, amid the economic fallout of COVID-19, many transit agencies have or anticipate having to cut service, which could hurt low-income and Latino communities who rely most on public transportation and don’t have the option to work from home, particularly in cities where transit is already infrequent and unreliable. Cuts to transit service could also hurt the millions of families who have lost jobs or lost hours and are considering selling a vehicle to save money. As local, state, and federal leaders discuss recovery plans, they need to consider ...

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Why You Should Answer Calls from Your Health Department about COVID-19


Why You Should Answer Calls From Your Health Department

Have you or someone close to you tested positive for COVID-19? You should have gotten a phone call from a local public health worker─a “case investigator” or “contact tracer”─who would give guidance on monitoring symptoms, quarantining to prevent spread, and more. But some cities don’t have enough people to make these important calls. Also, some people don’t answer or return phone calls from unknown numbers and may be uncomfortable answering questions. That is why, to reduce the spread of COVID-19, cities must invest in extensive contact tracing efforts and encourage the public to answer or return phone calls from the health department. “Case investigation and contact tracing, a core disease control measure employed by local and state health department ...

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