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4 Ways to Reduce Latino Workplace Fatalities


latino worker

We already know that Latinos are more likely to die on the job compared to their white and black counterparts. The majority of Latino work-related deaths happen in the construction industry, and most fatalities affect foreign-born Latinos. However, there is good news: This issue was addressed at the Safety 2019 Conference. “There is a lack of communication between foreign-born Latinos, their superiors and even their coworkers because of limited language capabilities,” Carmen Julia Castellon, Health and Safety Specialist for U.S. Cellular and a Bolivian immigrant, told EHS Today. Latinos & Workplace Harms Latinos make up 19% of all workforce fatalities, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2016, 879 Latino workers were killed on the job. Just one year ...

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New Affordable Housing Bill Aims to Add 1.9M Units Nationwide


Affordable Housing for Seniors- A Reality Check

A bipartisan effort led by Senators and Representatives alike proposes a new plan to help solve America's widespread lack of access to homeownership. The Affordable Housing Credit Improvement Act of 2019, also known as the Low Income Housing Tax Credit, would expand and strengthen the Affordable Housing Tax Credit. Senator Maria Cantwell introduced the bill on the Senate floor last week, urging fellow-legislators to act in this issue. "We know that this challenge of moving forward on affordable housing is something that is a bipartisan issue," Cantwell, one of the bill's sponsors, said. "The tax credit has had bipartisan support for many years in the United States Congress. We just need to put the pedal to the metal and provide more of the tax credit so we can get more ...

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Did That Last Fast Food Run Increase Your Risk of Cancer?



The way you eat can have a significant impact on your overall health. Food choices can even be the cause of developing invasive cancers, according to a new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Cancer Spectrum. Researchers found that individual diets could play a factor in 80,110 of the newly reported invasive cancer cases in 2015. That's 5.2% of the total number of cases among U.S. adults from that year. “Our findings underscore the opportunity to reduce the cancer burden and disparities in the United States by improving food intake,” said Dr. Fang Fang Zhang, one of the study's authors and a cancer, nutrition researcher at Tufts University. About the Study Researchers analyzed nationally-representative information to identify trends between ...

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In Texas, 1 in 4 Women of Childbearing Age Lack Health Insurance



The rate of uninsured childbearing-age women in Texas (39.4% Latino) is more than double the national average. Over 25% of women ages 18 to 44 are not covered, according to a new study from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. The national average? 12.3%. This disparity reflects the state's Medicaid expansion policy choices, Joan Alker, the center’s executive director, told KUT News. "Low-wage workers don’t have offers of affordable health insurance in a state like Texas, perhaps more so than other states," Alker said. Insurance Access and Overall Health Researchers set out to discover whether or not state Medicaid expansions through the Affordable Care Act would impact the rate of insured women. Their results illustrate a clear message: Where ...

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Latino Youth Use Photography to Identify Mental Health Triggers in Philadelphia



Latino children are far more likely than their peers to suffer depression and many other psychological issues that will go untreated at higher rates than their peers. May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and it is crucial to not only address this issue at-large but also to consider the inequities that impact underrepresented communities. Latino students in Philadelphia (14.1% Latino) are capturing those disparities and trials that can lead to the development of harmful mental conditions, through an initiative by the Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity (P-CHE) and Thomas Jefferson University. This is one of many innovative solutions communities and schools are developing to promote healthy minds. Other programs across the country are also trying to change the status quo, ...

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Latino & Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care


rural health

Most Americans living in rural communities say they are content with most aspects of their lives; however, two significant concerns stand out: Financial insecurity and the high medical costs. Two surveys, conducted through a partnership between NPR, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, found that 40% of that demographic struggle with healthcare, housing, and food expenses. Healthcare Access, or Lack There Of The surveys also found that 26% of rural Americans said they had not received desperately needed medical attention due to their limited budget. However, nine in 10 respondents did report having health insurance. An increase that is attributed to the implementation Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion. A decade ago, this was ...

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Latino Immigrants Experience Losses, Distress During and After Migration



Medical access can be a determining factor in whether or not someone lives a healthy life. Lack of healthcare treatment especially impacts undocumented Mexican immigrants, according to new findings published in the Journal of Latinx Psychology. Not only does this have immediate effects on Latinos, but research also shows this demographic can suffer long-term psychological and physical impairments related to their migration, according toTexas Medical Center News (TMCN). “We knew there was a high prevalence of loss and trauma in this population—we expect it because we know the many challenges they face. However, they were so much higher than I could even imagine, particularly in terms of repeated exposure or multiple losses,” said Dr. Luz Garcini, the study’s lead author and a ...

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Preemption Toolkit Promotes Equity


Preemption

Federal, state officials have the ability to determine the legislative powers of smaller government bodies. While the distribution of federal and local power has been up for debate since the constitution's creation, one thing is clear: Preemptive laws have the ability to restrict lawmakers' capacity to propose, pass, and enact bills and acts that help the people they serve. However, Voices for Healthy Kids has available a preemption toolkit that will help communities promote health, well-being, and equity. What is Preemption Law? Preemption laws are those that come from a congressional body and give smaller governmental agencies no choice in their implementation. In other words, a higher form of government can limit a lower form of government from taking action on an ...

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EPA Receives Over 450,000 Clean Air Comments


Mercury air pollution

In another attempt to roll back environmental protections, the EPA is proposing to revise the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard (MATS). However, the agency received a total 473,714 comments that provide insights and opinions that largely urge against their proposed plans; 231 members of the Salud America! network also sent an email to EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler pressing for clean air quality. A large portion of these comments focuses on the EPA’s recent de-regulatory efforts, and their refusal to make policy decisions based on scientific findings or relevant data, according to The Pump Handle. Last month, a coalition of 21 attorneys general filled comments that oppose the proposed rule as well as issuing a press release that rebukes recent environmental rollbacks. “EPA blinds ...

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