#SaludTues Tweetchat 12/5: Why Should You Try a Clinical Trial?


latino doctor patient clinical trial 2

Clinical trials have led to the development of better treatments, life-saving medicines, and new prevention strategies for cancer and other diseases. Still, clinical trials have lacked volunteers who are Latino. We need diverse representation in clinical trials to ensure health and medical discoveries are equitable for diverse populations. To promote clinical trials, let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2023, to discuss reasons why Latinos and all people should consider joining a clinical trial! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Why Should You Try a Clinical Trial? TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2023 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Latinx Voces LLC (@latinxvocesllc); LatinaStrong Foundation ...

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“I Couldn’t Feel More Blessed”: How Amber Lopez Found Hope Through Her Cancer Journey



News of a cancer diagnosis is the last thing anyone wants to hear.   It can be especially devastating for a teenager with no family history of cancer.   That was reality for Amber Lopez.  Lopez, a San Antonio resident who began experiencing symptoms around age 14, was eventually diagnosed with cervical cancer a few years later at 18.   “When you hear that word cancer, you’re kind of like, 'Oh, my God. OK. So, does that mean like, I’m going to pass away? How does this work?'” Lopez said.  Since her diagnosis, Lopez has overcome many challenges in her cancer journey.   Now she’s sharing her story through the Avanzando Caminos study at UT Health San Antonio to give hope to other Latino cancer survivors.   Navigating Her Cancer Diagnosis   Latinas ...

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Watch: Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez on the Importance of Cancer Screening for Latinos


Chasing Cancer Screening Amelie Ramirez Washington Post

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, leader of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio, joined The Washington Post's live show to share how cancer screening can help patients get diagnosed and treated earlier The show, "Chasing Cancer: The Path Forward," sponsored by AstraZeneca, took place Nov. 8, 2023. In the first part of of the show, Renee Wegrzyn, director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H), and Eric Topol, executive vice president of Scripps Research, discussed how technological advancements and AI are changing how cancer is diagnosed and treated. In the second part of the show, Ramirez teamed with Dr. Gladys I. Rodriguez, a medical oncologist with the START Center for Cancer Care, to discuss innovative initiatives make it easier to access early screenings, ...

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Speed the Search for Better Treatments by Joining the GO2 Lung Cancer Registry!



Researchers need your help as they seek to better understand how lung cancer impacts people differently and how to improve treatment and quality of life.  That’s why the GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer started its Lung Cancer Registry.   The international Lung Cancer Registry, available to join now, aims to double the 5-year survival rate of lung cancer patients from 20% to 40% by 2025.   “By sharing your lung cancer story, contributing your experiences as a person with lung cancer or a caregiver of someone with lung cancer, you are helping the research community develop new treatments,” according to GO2.  Let’s dive into more about the registry, how you can join, and how it can help Latinos.   Joining the Lung Cancer Registry   Participants interested in ...

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From Fluke to Survivor: How Angelina Vazquez Felsing is Contributing to Latino Cancer Research



“It was kind of a fluke.”  That’s how Angelina Vazquez Felsing describes the events that led to her diagnosis of lung cancer.   Like many, Vazquez Felsing maintained a healthy lifestyle. She didn’t smoke. She ate healthy, ran regularly, and had no family history of cancer.   Vazquez Felsing, who immigrated from Mazatlán, Mexico, in 1972, grew up in the Floresville area and has lived in San Antonio for many years.   It all started when Vazquez Felsing went to her yearly checkup through the wellness program at her job, where she has worked as a systems analyst for 17 years.  “They found something that was a little bit odd. They said, ‘Well come back in a year, and we'll do another CT scan,’” she said. “And when I went back, they found that whatever ...

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Adan Reinosa: Colorectal Cancer Survivor Pays it Forward with Study Participation


Adan Reinosa Rivera NCI colorectal cancer survivor - featured

Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death among people of Hispanic and Latino descent in the United States. Adan Reinosa Rivera, a retired electrical engineer in Los Angeles, is doing his part to change that. Mr. Reinosa has been living with metastatic colorectal cancer for more than a decade. The cancer was detected in his lungs a few months after a tumor was removed from his colon. He’s been managing the disease with his doctor ever since. Now, as the first participant in a genetic study called ENLACEExit Disclaimer, Mr. Reinosa is helping to build a body of knowledge about the molecular features of colorectal cancers in Hispanic and Latino people. The study, supported by the Cancer MoonshotSM, aims to learn more about the disease in people of Hispanic and ...

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Surviving Is Not Enough: New Study to Boost Mental Abilities in Cancer Survivors


yoga latina hispanic mindfulness mental abilities in cancer survivors

A big challenge for cancer survivors is a disruption in "cognitive functioning." Stress can contribute to lapses in attention, memory, and other mental abilities that can limit a survivor's daily activities and ability to work. To help, researchers from UT Health San Antonio and UT San Antonio will test a 6-month therapeutic Yoga program — along with supportive text messages and dietary guidance — to improve cognitive functioning in 35 Latina and 35 non-Latina breast cancer survivors. The pilot project, "Surviving is Not Enough: Enhancing Cognitive Function in Cancer Survivors through Movement and Introspection," is led by Dr. Daniel Carlos Hughes, a researcher at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio, and Dr. Joseph Houpt, professor of ...

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We’re Hiring a Research Scientist!


ihpr research scientist senio job position ut health san antonio

Are you passionate about public health? The Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio — home to the Salud America! program — is seeking a qualified senior research scientist with expertise in public health research. The position will focus on two IHPR projects: Avanzando Caminos (Leading Pathways): The Hispanic/Latino Cancer Survivorship Study Avanzando Equidad de Salud: Latino Cancer Health Equity Research Center Apply here for the senior research scientist position. “Our goal is to find a passionate research scientist who can help us plan, coordinate, analyze, and produce scientific content for clinical and regulatory documents on these two important research projects,” said Dr. Amelie Ramirez, director of the IHPR and chair of ...

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The Need for Latino-Focused Parkinson’s Disease Research



Parkinson’s disease is a brain disorder that causes uncontrollable movements, such as shaking, stiffness, and difficulty with balance, according to the National Institute on Aging.  But what do you really know about Parkinson’s and your risk?  Let’s dive into the causes, symptoms, and treatment of Parkinson’s and how it impacts Latinos.   What Causes Parkinson’s Disease?  Parkinson’s disease is a progressive and chronic nervous system disorder that affects movement and is caused by destroyed nerve cells in the brain.    “A decrease in dopamine levels leads to abnormal brain activity, causing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, it is currently unknown what causes the death of neurons in the brain,” according to dementia.org.  While the exact ...

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