Watch Webinar: All of Us in the Alamo City Matter



We know you care about the health of people in San Antonio. Watch our webinar, “All of Us in Alamo City Matter: Where You Live Impacts Your Health,” at 10-11 a.m. CT, Wednesday, March 20, 2024! The webinar explored the state of social determinants of health (SDOH) in San Antonio and how we can leverage the All of Us Research Program to promote health equity in health research. Some studies suggest that SDOH plays a role in about 30% to 55% of our health outcomes. This means that nearly half of our health issues are a result of our environment and life circumstances. Hear more from our expert panelists, including representatives from South Texas Blood & Tissue, Mexican American Unity Council, and Salud America! at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health ...

Read More

Recap: The 2024 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos Conference



Why is cancer the top cause of death for Latinos? To unpack this question, Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio hosted the 4th biennial Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos conference on Feb. 21-23, 2024, in San Antonio, Texas. Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos drew 280 researchers, doctors, leaders, patient advocates, and students for an open dialogue on Latino cancer. Discussion covered new research advances on clinical best practices, effective community interventions, system-change advocacy, and professional training to eliminate cancer disparities in Latinos. “Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos is where we can come together and find equitable solutions for cancer prevention, treatment, and survivorship among Latinos,” ...

Read More

What Would Happen If More People Got Cancer Screenings?



Cancer screening can help catch cancer early when it is more treatable. But participation in screening is sporadic at best, especially among Latinos.  What would happen if more people got screened for cancer?  To find out, a team of U.S. and Canadian researchers used computer modeling to estimate the number of deaths that could be prevented, and the harms caused, if more people followed recommended cancer screening guidelines.  Let’s explore what they found and what it means for Latino cancer.  The Impact of More Screening: Potential Lives Saved  Cancer screenings can catch early cases of lung, colorectal, cervical, and breast cancers.  But only 13% of people eligible are up to date for lung cancer screening; 69% for colorectal cancer screening; 73% for cervical ...

Read More

New Cancer Cases Projected to Surpass 2M Historical High



New cancer cases are projected to surpass 2 million in 2024 - a first in for the U.S., according to American Cancer Society’s Cancer Facts & Figures 2024 report.  The landmark projection amounts to 5,500 diagnoses a day.  The American Cancer Society attributes the rise in cases to a growing and aging population along with an increase in diagnoses of six common cancers – breast, prostate, endometrial, pancreatic, kidney, and melanoma.  In addition, the organization is projecting over 611,000 deaths from cancer in 2024, a .19% increase from 2023. That is more than 1,600 deaths each day!  While cancer is prevalent across people of all races, ethnicities, ages, genders, and backgrounds, it disproportionately continues to affect people of color, such as Latinos.  Cancer in ...

Read More

Help South Texas Researchers Learn More About Sleep Disturbance



Do you get the recommended 7-10 hours of sleep a night?   Insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality contribute to the development and management of many health issues, from diabetes to heart disease, according to the CDC.   Researchers at UT Health San Antonio and their partners are studying sleep disturbances among blood cancer patients and comparing effectiveness of two wellness-based mobile apps to help improve sleep.   The Reducing Sleep disTurbance in Cancer (REST-C) study, also called the Heme Study, is a clinical trial that is currently recruiting adults diagnosed with blood cancer and experiencing sleep disturbance. A clinical trial is a study that helps researchers learn more about how different treatments and interventions can be used to help slow, manage, and ...

Read More

Restoring Trustworthiness in the Healthcare System



The COVID-19 pandemic hurt public trust in healthcare and science. Trust is especially low among communities that experience health disparities and barriers to healthcare, according to Dr. David W. Baker of The Joint Commission in Illinois. “Black and Latino communities faced inadequate testing, financial barriers to care, and disproportionately high rates of COVID-19 cases and deaths, further threatening their trust in physicians, the health care system, public health, and science,” Baker wrote in his article, Trust in Health Care in the Time of COVID-19. Misinformation and a lack of trust in healthcare can spur a cycle of reduced care and ultimately contribute to worse health outcomes. But how can trust in healthcare be restored? Reasons for Latino Distrust in ...

Read More

#SaludTues Tweetchat 12/5: Why Should You Try a Clinical Trial?


latino doctor patient clinical trial 2

Clinical trials have led to the development of better treatments, life-saving medicines, and new prevention strategies for cancer and other diseases. Still, clinical trials have lacked volunteers who are Latino. We need diverse representation in clinical trials to ensure health and medical discoveries are equitable for diverse populations. To promote clinical trials, let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2023, to discuss reasons why Latinos and all people should consider joining a clinical trial! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Why Should You Try a Clinical Trial? TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2023 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Latinx Voces LLC (@latinxvocesllc); LatinaStrong Foundation ...

Read More

“I Couldn’t Feel More Blessed”: How Amber Lopez Found Hope Through Her Cancer Journey



News of a cancer diagnosis is the last thing anyone wants to hear.   It can be especially devastating for a teenager with no family history of cancer.   That was reality for Amber Lopez.  Lopez, a San Antonio resident who began experiencing symptoms around age 14, was eventually diagnosed with cervical cancer a few years later at 18.   “When you hear that word cancer, you’re kind of like, 'Oh, my God. OK. So, does that mean like, I’m going to pass away? How does this work?'” Lopez said.  Since her diagnosis, Lopez has overcome many challenges in her cancer journey.   Now she’s sharing her story through the Avanzando Caminos study at UT Health San Antonio to give hope to other Latino cancer survivors.   Navigating Her Cancer Diagnosis   Latinas ...

Read More

Watch: Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez on the Importance of Cancer Screening for Latinos


Chasing Cancer Screening Amelie Ramirez Washington Post

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, leader of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio, joined The Washington Post's live show to share how cancer screening can help patients get diagnosed and treated earlier The show, "Chasing Cancer: The Path Forward," sponsored by AstraZeneca, took place Nov. 8, 2023. In the first part of of the show, Renee Wegrzyn, director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H), and Eric Topol, executive vice president of Scripps Research, discussed how technological advancements and AI are changing how cancer is diagnosed and treated. In the second part of the show, Ramirez teamed with Dr. Gladys I. Rodriguez, a medical oncologist with the START Center for Cancer Care, to discuss innovative initiatives make it easier to access early screenings, ...

Read More