Health Insurance for All Children Under 19, in California



All children under 19 years old will be eligible for the state’s health insurance in California (Medi-Cal), Univision Noticias reports. The law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown will potentially  benefit 200,000 undocumented children who currently have access to a limited state health insurance. “In the middle of the national conversation on immigration, sometimes negative, we congratulate Governor and the legislature for recognizing the contributions of undocumented Californians and their human right to health access,” Daniel Zingale, vice president of The California Endowment told Univision. Currently, most undocumented migrants have limited access to the state’s version of Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The new law will give full health benefits to undocumented children in ...

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New Anti-Smoking Campaign Targets Minorities of Color



The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) is launching “Fresh Empire” a hip-hop themed anti-tobacco campaign targeted at Latinos and Blacks. “Unfortunately, the health burdens of tobacco use disproportionately affect minority teens – particularly African American and Hispanic youth,” said Jonca Bull, M.D., the FDA’s Assistant Commissioner for Minority Health in a press release. "The 'Fresh Empire' campaign will help reach teens at a key point in their lives when experimenting with smoking can lead to addiction." The “Fresh Start” campaign will target youth ages 12-17 with interactive content, songs and videos by up and coming hip hop artists. "We know from our research that remaining in control is an important pillar of hip-hop culture. But smoking represents a ...

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Meg Reyes: Sobreviviente de cáncer de seno



Meg Reyes, fue diagnosticada con cáncer de seno con apenas 33 años “Solamente requería una tumorectomía”, dice ella, “pero a causa del tamaño de mi tumor mis doctores fueron muy agresivos con mi tratamiento y me removieron 16 ganglios”. Con el apoyo incondicional de sus familiares y amigos Megan sobrevivió el cáncer de seno. Diez años después, Megan es una consejera no-oficial para pacientes recién diagnosticadas con cáncer, ha perdido 150 libras, ha vivido en Alemania e Inglaterra y ha sido madrina de un estudiante de intercambio japonés. El sobrevivir “significa vivir aun después de que algo difícil se cruce en tu camino. No tiene que ser cáncer, puede ser cualquier cosa que hayas sobrevivido y como manejas esas situaciones.” Lee la historia ...

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Mary Gonzalez: Latina Cancer Survivor



A few months after her mother’s death, Mary Gonzalez asked her doctor, if she should have a mammogram, the doctor said she was too young. Two years after she found a lump under her arm and after insisting to have it checked she found out it was breast cancer. “It was like a bad dream. Things were going way too fast and I was in shock. Too many decisions had to be made in too little time. As I remembered my mother going through chemotherapy, losing her hair, the nausea and vomiting, I was terrified,” Gonzalez said. The fight against breast cancer became a family battle for the Gonzales “My husband and I became very educated on breast cancer and its treatment. We read, asked a lot of questions, and took it one step at a time.” One question that remained unanswered was ...

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Meg Reyes: Latina Cancer Survivor



Meg Reyes, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the early age of 33. “I was only required to have a lumpectomy,” she says, “but because of the tumor size my doctors were very aggressive in my treatment and removed 16 lymph nodes,” With the support of her family and co-workers Megan survived breast cancer. 10+ years after, she’s an unofficial counselor for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, she has lost 150 pounds, has lived in Germany and England and has hosted a Japanese exchange student. [Survivorship means]“living life even after something challenging happened in your life experience. It doesn’t have to be cancer, it can be anything that you survived and how you deal with those adverse action,” Reyes said. Read Meg’s full story on Redes en ...

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New EPA Regulations Benefit Latino Farm Workers



The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has unveiled new strict rules that protect farm workers from hazardous pesticides, Fox Health reports. The new rules will benefit an estimated 2 million workers, mostly Latinos who work at or near farms, forests, nurseries and greenhouses. “We depend on farm workers every day... they deserve fair, equitable working standards with strong health and safety protections," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said in a statement. Under the new regulations children under 18 are “prohibited from handling pesticides; training on pesticide protections is required annually instead of once every five years; expanded postings of no-entry signs on fields treated with hazardous pesticides are required; and improvements in personal protection ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 1p ET 9/22/15: “Building Healthier Communities Through Schools”



Schools are part of a community. Schools also make a huge influence in a child’s health. How can schools help build a culture of health within their communities? Let’s use #SaludTues to tweet information, resources, and tips that help schools, teachers, families and students take charge of health in their communities. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Building Healthier Communities Through Schools” DATE: Tuesday, September 22, 2015 TIME: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludToday CO-HOSTS: It’s Time Texas (@ITSTIME), Shape America (@Shape_America), Healthy Kids Today (@HealthyKids2Day)  and our special guest, Transformative Schools Network (@Cr8HlthySchools) We’ll open the floor to your stories and experiences ...

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CDC: Flu Vaccine Will Be More Effective This Year



This year’s flu vaccine will be much more effective at protecting people from the virus than last year’s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NPR Health reports. Based on “analysis of the most common strains of flu virus that are circulating in the United States and elsewhere found they match the strains included in this year's vaccine” the CDC said. Experts recommend annual flu vaccination for people 6 months or older. Unfortunately, among Latinos only 40 percent gets the flu shot every year. Flu season begins in early October and peaks between December and February. "Get vaccinated, that’s the best way to protect yourself, your family and your community against the flu,” Thomas Frieden, Director of the CDC ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 9/15/15: Connecting Latino Kids to Health Coverage


latino kid at doctor

Over the last several years, millions of U.S. kids have been connected with free or low-cost health coverage through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). But more than 3 million kids remain eligible but uninsured, including many Latino kids. Join us for a #SaludTues Tweetchat on Sept. 15, 2015, to tweet about what we can do to close the gap and make sure that all kids—and more parents, too—get the health insurance they need and deserve: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Connecting Latino Kids to Health Coverage” DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludToday CO-HOSTS: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Connecting Kids to Coverage Campaign (@IKNGov) and ...

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