Salud Talks Podcast Episode One: “On Fire”


Salud Talks Episode 1 On fire

In its first episode, the Salud Talks podcast covers one of the critical issues of our time: the Climate Crisis. We sat down with experts in this field to discuss the history behind climate change, how we got where we are today, and what has to be done to save the planet. The episode went live on Sept. 4, 2019, at 6 a.m. WHAT: A discussion on the climate crisis and how it is and will continue to impact Latinos and all Americans GUESTS: Dolores "DeeDee" Belmares, the Texas Field Consultant for Moms Clean Air Force, and Dr. Juan Declet-Barreto, a climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists WHERE: Available wherever fine podcasts are downloaded, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, SoundCloud, Tune In, and others. WHEN: Live Wed., Sept. 4, 2019, at 6 ...

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Building for Holistic Health: Connecting to Nature


architecture Biophilia nature design

Feeling the sun’s rays, breathing in cool air, lying amongst the trees, standing in the rain — all ways of how nature can ground people and bring about feelings of joy. While it’s true that most Latinos and Americans might spend up to 90% of their time indoors, building design can give inhabitants a sense of connectivity to our environment, or biophilia. Construction workers and architects should make the most of nature to create health-centric structures, according to the American Institute of Architects (AIA). “Simply put, nature is good for us because we are part of nature,” writes Dr. Miles Richardson, director of core psychology programs at the University of Derby. “We are human animals evolved to make sense of the natural world, and this embeddedness in the ...

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Building for Holistic Health: Mental Wellness


architecture happiness building design

Architecture can influence many aspects of health, including body temperature and allergies — even our mental health. From window placement to floor design, how buildings are laid out will influence the way a person feels. More importantly, this influence can impact the day-to-day lives of people, according to Ben Channon, a U.K. architect and author of "Happy by Design." "We spend 80% of time indoors, but we give little thought to how bricks and mortar impact us physiologically," Channon told Planning, BIM & Construction Today. "Most building design prioritizes cost efficiencies and overheads, rather than paying attention to the nuances of human experience." Design, Characterless and Inexpensive Whether a room is small and cozy or large and grandiose, it can shift aspects ...

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Experts Say Climate Crisis Heat Will Make Many Urban Areas Unlivable


heat index Climate change

From New England to the Southwest, Americans are sweating through their shirts as cities across the country experience record-high temperatures. More importantly, the gauge of how hot a place feels, the heat index, has also been on the rise. The National Weather Service has sent numerous warnings to many areas, cautioning of "prolonged period of dangerously hot temperatures and high humidity." Meteorologists attribute this latest heatwave to atmospheric shifts. Worse, experts and researchers say the heatwave is only one part of the broader climate crisis problem — one that could lead to nearly 300 cities becoming uninhabitable. "Think about the most extreme summer heat you've ever experienced in your lifetime. That will become a typical summer day by the middle of this ...

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1,505 Salud America! Network Members Urge for Better Climate Science!


2040 Climate Change USGS

Since taking office, the Trump administration has made numerous moves that reduce the government’s role in combating climate change – including scientific research. In April, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) announced it would no longer project climate change’s long-term impacts. This means a reduction in our understanding of the issue's full scope could occur as a result. In response, 1,505 members of the Salud America! network sent USGS Director James Reilly a message: Do not limit climate science by limiting the data researchers collect. Other individuals and groups also spoke out against this decision. A coalition of 20 Senators— including Kamala Harris and Dianne Feinstein—sent Reilly a letter that shorter projections would make it harder to gauge and ...

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30% of Gulf War Veterans Still Experience Harmful Nervous System Illness


Gulf War Illness

In August 1990, former President George H.W. Bush began Operation Desert Storm in response to the Iraqi invasion and occupation of Kuwait. More than 650,000 U.S. military personnel would join the Gulf War over the next year before this Middle Eastern conflict formally ended on July 31, 1991. Sadly, Gulf War illness continues to affect 30% of those veterans today, decades later. While there is a limited understanding of this sickness, researchers are making strides to discover how to help affected soldiers, according to Jorge M. Serrador, an associate professor at Rutgers Medical School and a scientist at the New Jersey War Related Illness and Injury Study Center. "Although it's been more than 25 years since the conflict, we still do not understand the underlying cause of these ...

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Building for Holistic Health: Indoor Air Quality


building indoor air quality

Most Latinos and Americans spend the majority of their time inside of homes, offices, restaurants, movie theaters, and other buildings. The indoor air quality in these spaces might not cross most people’s mind. However, researchers say the air inside buildings can billow into a significant health concern because poor air quality can lead to numerous short- and long-term complications — headaches, dizziness, fatigue, respiratory diseases, Toxicant‐Induced Loss of Tolerance (TILT), and even cancer. “It is important to be aware of your environment,” Dr. Claudia Miller, an environmental health professor and leader of the Hoffman TILT program at UT Health San Antonio, writes. “This is especially important for indoor air, as most people spend 90% of their time ...

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Is Your Fashion Making You Sick?


disperse dyes clothing sickness

Like many large-scale manufactured products in today’s society, the shirts, sweaters, and pants found on the racks contain harmful chemicals – some of which can cause breakouts and rashes. One primary health concern, allergic contact dermatitis, forms on one’s body when their skin comes in contact with harmful substances. Worse, it can have a delayed effect, and now researchers suggest that consumers wash all newly-purchased clothing before wearing. “What’s maddening for the consumer is that you buy a shirt that says ‘100% cotton,’ and yet you’re given no information about any of the chemicals or additives that have been used,” David Andrews, a senior scientist who has investigated chemicals in clothing with the Environmental Working Group, told TIME. What ...

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UPDATE: States Sue EPA Over Chemical Linked to Brain Damage in Children


chlorpyrifos ban EPA

UPDATE: August 8, 2019 Six states filed lawsuits against the EPA over chlorpyrifos—a pesticide that is linked to numerous and life-threatening effects—yesterday. Researchers have connected this form of chemical exposure to the development of cognitive, physical complications, according to The Hill.  The states, which include California (39.3% Latino), New York (19.2%), Massachusetts (12.3%), Washington (12.9%), Maryland (10.4%), and Vermont (2%), say the chemical is too dangerous to be on the market. “Parents shouldn’t have to question whether everyday fruits and vegetables will poison their children,” California Attorney General Becerra said in a press release. “The EPA is egregiously sacrificing our children’s health by refusing to make a determination on this ...

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