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#SaludTues Tweetchat 7/16: How to Win the Fight Against Sugary Drinks


fight sugary drinks tweetchat saludtues

Latino kids consume more sugary drinks than non-Latino kids at all ages, which contributes to their high obesity rates, among other health issues, research shows. Fortunately, many new policies are emerging to fight sugary drink consumption. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, July 16, 2019, to tweet about what’s working to fight sugary drink consumption and increase consumption of water for Latino and all kids!  WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How to Win the Fight Against Sugary Drinks” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, July 16, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOST: The American Academy of Pediatrics (@AmerAcadPeds), The Horizon Foundation (@thehorizonfound), Center for Science in the Public Interest (@CSPI), ...

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#SaludTues 7/9: ‘YOUnite Research!’ The Importance of Clinical Trial Participation


female doctor clinical trials

The importance of clinical trial participation cannot be overstated, especially among minority groups like Latinos. 1 in 6 individuals in the U.S. are Latino, yet only 1% participate in clinical trials. Despite the rapid growth of Latino populations all across the U.S., Latinos continue to lag behind in clinical trial participation. Why should we be concerned with getting more Latinos involved in clinical research trials?  Lack of Data on Latinos While scientists continue to learn more about diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, through advances in genetics and medical technologies, the data collected is often not representative of the population. This means that new medicine or treatments may not be effective among Latinos, therefore it is crucial to ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 7/2: The Importance of Minority Mental Health Month


latina hispanic woman mental health eating disorders

July is Minority Mental Health Month. Mental illness does not discriminate based on race. However, Latinos are far more likely than their peers to have mental health issues, according to a Salud America! Research Review. Additionally, Latinos and blacks are less likely than whites to get the mental health services they need, thus leading to a plethora of problems such as missing work. Join us for #SaludTues on Tuesday, July 2, 2019 for a tweetchat in honor of Minority Mental Health Month. What: #SaludTues Tweetchat –  The Importance of Minority Mental Health Month Time/Date: 1-2 P.M. ET (Noon-1 P.M. CT), Tuesday, July 2, 2019 Where: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Stamp Out Stigma (@StampStigma) and The American Foundation ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/25: How to Address Alzheimer’s & Brain Health in Latinos


latino alzheimer's disease dementia tweetchat brain health

June marks Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month. This is a time to reflect on the many challenges and inequities facing people of color in the United States when it comes to Alzheimer's Disease and overall brain health. Sadly, U.S. Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than whites, studies show. Alcohol, sleep deprivation, and diabetes play a role in this gap. Worse, Latino caregivers can experience high levels of stress when supporting their family members with the disease. To understand and address these disparities, people must pay more attention to the role of the social determinants of health. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, June 25, 2019, to tweet about the latest research and beneficial strategies and programs to prevent and reduce ...

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#SaludTues 6/18: Let’s Celebrate Men’s Health Month!


Latino man music treadmill

Heart disease and cancer are among the leading causes of death for Latino men. Each year over 40% of men in the U.S., are lost to such chronic diseases, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Why do men face higher health risks?   Compared to women, men are often less likely to get preventative screenings or checkups.  Additionally, certain health behaviors related to diet, physical inactivity, and smoking may lead to increased risks of disease.   Certain occupations and exposures may also put men at risk for certain cancers and poor health.   Join us this month for #SaludTues at 1 p.m. ET on June 18, 2019, to celebrate and help promote Men’s Health Month!  WHAT: #SaludTuesTweetchat: “Let's Celebrate Men's Health ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/11: Air Quality and Pollution


Air Quality and Pollution Chat

Air quality impacts a lot more than what you might think. Noxious gasses and fumes contaminate the atmosphere every day, and the problem is getting worse — especially for Latinos and other minorities. Current government policies are also making the problem worse through roll-back initiatives. This year, the EPA is taking steps to reduce air pollution rules. These regulation reductions would give companies more room to emit higher levels of harmful substances. If enacted, those policies could expose more Americans to harm, causing greater long-term health impacts. Let’s use #SaludTues on Twitter on Tuesday, June 11, 2019, to discuss why our air quality is so important and what everyone can do to make a difference in this issue: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Air ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/4: Moving Beyond Social Needs to Address Social Determinants of Health



Inequities in health arise from social and structural inequities and the policies, laws, and culture that keep them in place. To address inequities that affect health, it is important to make the distinction between individual-level (midstream) interventions to address “social needs,” and community-level (upstream) interventions to address “social determinants.” Individual-level efforts to address social needs are necessary, but not enough. Characterizing these interventions as efforts to address social determinants of health conveys a false sense of progress. "If we, even inadvertently, imply that the social determinants of health can be solved by offering Uber rides to individual patients or by deploying community health navigators, it will be challenging, if not ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/28: How to Prevent Skin Cancer in Communities of Color


sunscreen apply to prevent skin cancer latino hispanic girl

Summer is here. Unfortunately, so is skin cancer risk. Too much unprotected exposure to the sun can give you more than a sun burn. Rates of melanoma—the most dangerous form of skin cancer—have skyrocketed in recent years. This rise is happening even among Latinos and other dark-skinned populations. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, May 28, 2019, to share strategies to improve the prevention of skin cancer among Latinos and all people: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How to Prevent Skin Cancer in Communities of Color” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, May 28, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (@CDC_Cancer); the American Academy of Dermatology ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/21/19: Clean Water Justice and Access



Did you know millions of Americans struggle to access clean water every day? Pollution and chemical contamination has impacted the drinking water of U.S. soldiers, public school students, and families who can lack the ability to purchase and use water filtration tools. Moreover, currently proposed pieces of legislation could make that problem much worse. The EPA hopes to roll back clean water protections, and by doing so, giving companies loopholes to dump hazardous material into our sources of water. This kind of pollution harm our country’s rivers, lakes, and groundwater supplies. Let’s use #SaludTues on Twitter on Tuesday, May 21, 2019, to tweet relevant information about current issues in clean water access and what is being done to solve the problem: ...

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