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Stacy Cantu-Pawlik

Stacy Cantu completed both her BS & MPH at Texas A&M University (gig ‘em!), and is passionate about all things public health. She curates content on Healthy Food and Healthy Minds.


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Articles by Stacy Cantu-Pawlik

Update: Farm Bill Passes with No Cuts to SNAP


SNAP poverty

The Farm Bill cleared the U.S. House on a 369–47 vote after passing the Senate with a vote of 87–13, and cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are not included, according to the Food Research & Action Center. Past versions of the bill had contained a $20 billion cut of SNAP over 10 years. “The negotiators appear to have achieved a bipartisan compromise that maintains and modestly strengthens SNAP, ensuring that millions of struggling Americans will continue to be able to count on SNAP to help them put food on the table,” Robert Greenstein, president of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, told the Washington Post. This is great news for Latinos and all. SNAP is proven to: Lifts millions of people out of poverty and helps them stay ...

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210,889 People Spoke Up on Public Charge!


Silhouette of a refugees family with children immigrant

More than 200,000 people—including some from Salud America!—submitted public comments on proposed changes to the "public charge" rule that could negatively impact the health of immigrant families. For the past 60 days, the U.S. government sought public comments on the Trump Administration's proposed changes to the public charge rule. Experts say the changes could penalize legal immigrants applying for green cards if they enroll in healthcare or use public benefits, such as food aid and housing. We at Salud America! asked our network to submit comments to protect families. Regulations.gov received a total of 210,889 comments! Here are some key results: Only 17,073 of the comments appear in search results on Regulations.gov, as of Dec. 11, 2018. About 40 people ...

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Texas Kids Are Most Uninsured in America


hispanic kid child girl cough sick no health insurance

The number of U.S. kids without health insurance is rising for the first time in 10 years. Texas has the highest number of children without health insurance in America, according to a new report by Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. The report found that more than 1 in 5 uninsured kids in the U.S. live in Texas, which is 835,000 as of 2017. From 2016 to 2017, Texas saw an increase of 83,000 uninsured kids. This is bad news for Latinos. Latinos, set to be the largest racial/ethnic population in Texas by 2022, are already the most uninsured U.S. group. Latino Kids and the Report This is the second-straight year Texas has had the nation's highest rate of uninsured children. There are many reasons for this, experts say. First, Texas has a greater ...

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Raheem Baraka’s Support Group for Latino Grandparents Raising Grandkids


Raheem Baraka

Family separations. Broken families. Little social support. In these tough times, abuela and abuelo often have to step up a caregivers for young children. That is why Raheem Baraka's Baraka Community Wellness partnered with nonprofit Tree of Life to create a unique support group for Spanish-speaking grandparents who are doubling as caregivers in Boston (19% Latino). "There are many grandparents who are raising their grandchildren," Baraka told Salud America! in July 2018. "There are broken families. There are challenges around our people staying together in highly traumatic and stressful situations." The Need for Grandparents as Caregivers In 2016, a record 64 million people, or 20% of the U.S. population, lived with multiple generations under one roof, according to a recent ...

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The Colossal Latina Pay Gap


latina pay gap data 2

U.S. Latinas are paid 47% less than white men on average, according to the National Partnership for Women and Families. Furthermore, Latinas are paid 31% less than White women. Regardless of their job, where they live, or their education, Latinas are paid less. This is not good. In the United States, one in five women is Latina. Latina Wage Gap Latinos already suffer a wide wealth divide than their white peers. Latina women specifically are paid 54 cents for every $1 paid to white non-Latino men, according to the new data. “Latinas face biases for being women and for being people of color. These compounding biases contribute to the Latina pay gap and help explain the inequality Latinas experience in the workplace” said Rachel Thomas, president of ...

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The Scary Reason Latino Men Don’t Get the Best Prostate Cancer Treatment


latino man and nurse doctor pensive chart implicit bias

All of us have unconscious or involuntary stereotypes that affect our feelings and actions about other people based on characteristics such as race, ethnicity, age, and appearance. This is called "implicit bias." Implicit bias can harm relationships, policies, and even health. In fact, implicit bias is a big reason why Latino men are much less likely to receive optimal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer than White men, according to a new study in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This is bad news for Latinos. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men of all races, including Latinos. The Prostate Cancer Disparity Between 2010-2014, researchers from UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Stanford Cancer ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 12/4/18: “Healthy Holidays – How To”


latino family holiday meal Thanksgiving

40% of Latino kids are overweight or obese, comparted to 32% of all U.S. children. Adult obesity rates reached 35% in at least 7 states and saw increases in 31 states across the U.S. from 2012-2017, while no significant drops in obesity rates were seen in any state, over the last year. Let’s use #SaludTues on Dec. 4, 2018, to tweet information, resources, and tips that will help us all prevent or help the health dangers of stress, unhealthy eating and limited physical activity during the best time of the year. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Healthy Holidays - How To” TIME / DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, 12/4/18 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Chap Care (@ChapCareOrg), American Heart Association San Antonio ...

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Rural Pharmacy Deserts Emerge Across the U.S.


closing of a walgreen's pharmacy from the Anniston Star

Hospital closures have become the norm in many rural areas. Now, rural pharmacies are headed on the same path, according to a U.S. News Report. Over the past 16 years, 1,231 rural, independently pharmacies owned have closed. That's 16% of all rural pharmacies. Fewer than 6,400 pharmacies are left in rural communities. Rural communities that had at least one retail (independent, chain, or franchise) pharmacy in March 2003 had no retail pharmacy in March 2018, according to RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis Rural Policy Brief. Residents of rural communities now have to travel great distances for medications and/or turn to mail-order prescriptions that make it impossible for in-person consultation concerning questions about the medication. “Closure of ...

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New Texas Institute Aims to Improve Rural Health



It is a well known fact that where we live plays a vital role in our health, and those who live in rural areas struggle to access quality healthcare. Rural residents are more likely to die from heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, and unintentional injuries than their urban counterparts. In Texas, more than 3 million people live in rural areas, and are more likely to be uninsured, have lower incomes, and higher rates of death from preventive chronic diseases. The Center for Optimizing Rural Health, part of the Texas A&M Rural and Community Health Institute, aims to change all that. Center for Optimizing Rural Health Texas A&M University has been chosen as the sole recipient of a five-year grant, which will fund the Center for Optimizing Rural Health, ...

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