About the Author

Author Picture

Stacy Cantu-Pawlik

Stacy Cantu completed both her BS & MPH at Texas A&M University (gig ‘em!), and is passionate about all things public health. She curates content on Healthy Food and Healthy Minds.


Connect with Stacy:
Twitter Link

Articles by Stacy Cantu-Pawlik

4 Ways to Reduce Latino Workplace Fatalities


latino worker

We already know that Latinos are more likely to die on the job compared to their white and black counterparts. The majority of Latino work-related deaths happen in the construction industry, and most fatalities affect foreign-born Latinos. However, there is good news: This issue was addressed at the Safety 2019 Conference. “There is a lack of communication between foreign-born Latinos, their superiors and even their coworkers because of limited language capabilities,” Carmen Julia Castellon, Health and Safety Specialist for U.S. Cellular and a Bolivian immigrant, told EHS Today. Latinos & Workplace Harms Latinos make up 19% of all workforce fatalities, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2016, 879 Latino workers were killed on the job. Just one year ...

Read More

Latino Kids Face Chronic Skin Condition Disparities


hispanic kid skin face swimming summer water

A skin disease is harming the health of children — and causing them to fall behind in their education. Latino and black children are more likely than white children to miss school due to eczema, according to researchers are the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. "Most people don't realize the serious impact eczema can have on a person's life, and our research shows minorities may be disproportionately affected," said the study's senior author Dr. Junko Takeshita, assistant professor of dermatology and epidemiology, according to Penn Medicine News. What is Eczema? Eczema, or atopic dermatitis (AD), is a common inflammatory disease that causes red and itchy skin. It affects 30 million Americans, including up to 20% of all children, according to the ...

Read More

Did That Last Fast Food Run Increase Your Risk of Cancer?



The way you eat can have a significant impact on your overall health. Food choices can even be the cause of developing invasive cancers, according to a new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Cancer Spectrum. Researchers found that individual diets could play a factor in 80,110 of the newly reported invasive cancer cases in 2015. That's 5.2% of the total number of cases among U.S. adults from that year. “Our findings underscore the opportunity to reduce the cancer burden and disparities in the United States by improving food intake,” said Dr. Fang Fang Zhang, one of the study's authors and a cancer, nutrition researcher at Tufts University. About the Study Researchers analyzed nationally-representative information to identify trends between ...

Read More

In Texas, 1 in 4 Women of Childbearing Age Lack Health Insurance



The rate of uninsured childbearing-age women in Texas (39.4% Latino) is more than double the national average. Over 25% of women ages 18 to 44 are not covered, according to a new study from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. The national average? 12.3%. This disparity reflects the state's Medicaid expansion policy choices, Joan Alker, the center’s executive director, told KUT News. "Low-wage workers don’t have offers of affordable health insurance in a state like Texas, perhaps more so than other states," Alker said. Insurance Access and Overall Health Researchers set out to discover whether or not state Medicaid expansions through the Affordable Care Act would impact the rate of insured women. Their results illustrate a clear message: Where ...

Read More

Cancer Rates Drop, But Racial & Gender Disparities Persist


cancer rates persist in Latinos and racial and ethnic populations

Cancer, mortality rates continue to decline for men, women, and children, according to an annual report released by the National Institutes of Health. Great news, right? Not so fast. In a special section of the report, researchers found that cancer development and mortality rates increased between 2011 and 2015 for women ages 20 to 49 — whereas men, who historically have higher rates than women, did not experience such gains.  The data also shows continuing disparities among Latinos and other racial/ethnic populations. “We are encouraged by the fact that this year’s report continues to show declining cancer mortality for men, women, and children, as well as other indicators of progress,” said Betsy A. Kohler, executive director of North American Association of ...

Read More

Latino Youth Use Photography to Identify Mental Health Triggers in Philadelphia



Latino children are far more likely than their peers to suffer depression and many other psychological issues that will go untreated at higher rates than their peers. May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and it is crucial to not only address this issue at-large but also to consider the inequities that impact underrepresented communities. Latino students in Philadelphia (14.1% Latino) are capturing those disparities and trials that can lead to the development of harmful mental conditions, through an initiative by the Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity (P-CHE) and Thomas Jefferson University. This is one of many innovative solutions communities and schools are developing to promote healthy minds. Other programs across the country are also trying to change the status quo, ...

Read More

Latino & Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care


rural health

Most Americans living in rural communities say they are content with most aspects of their lives; however, two significant concerns stand out: Financial insecurity and the high medical costs. Two surveys, conducted through a partnership between NPR, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, found that 40% of that demographic struggle with healthcare, housing, and food expenses. Healthcare Access, or Lack There Of The surveys also found that 26% of rural Americans said they had not received desperately needed medical attention due to their limited budget. However, nine in 10 respondents did report having health insurance. An increase that is attributed to the implementation Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion. A decade ago, this was ...

Read More

Latino Workers More Likely to Die on the Job


latino roof construction workers on the job

Latino workers are more likely to die on the job than anyone else. Most of the Latinos killed are also immigrants, according to a news report by KALW radio. “In 2017, we lost 376 workers [in California],” Jora Trang, a managing attorney at the labor rights’ organization Worksafe, told KALW. “That’s more than one worker a day.” Latinos & Job Fatalities Latinos have disproportionately died on the job for quite some time. In 2016, 879 Latino workers were killed on the job. In 2017, that number rose to 903. This puts the Latino fatality rate higher than the national job fatality rate for all workers, Latino Rebels reports. “This is a national crisis. And it’s well past time that our elected leaders in Washington, D.C., stop playing politics and take ...

Read More

Top Agriculture State to Prohibit Use of Controversial Pesticide



In California (39.1% Latino) there will soon be a ban on the widely utilized pesticide, chlorpyrifos. The state, which is one of the most prolific agricultural producers in America, is reportedly the most significant users of the chemical. "This pesticide is a neurotoxin, and it was first put on the market in 1965," State Environmental Secretary Jared Blumenfeld told The Californian. "So it's been on the shelf a long time, and it's past its sell-by date. What is Chlorpyrifos & Where Is It Found? Chlorpyrifos controls foliage and soil-borne insects on a variety of food and feed crops, according to the EPA. The chemical can be found in both agricultural and non-agriculture operations and is used: Mainly as a treatment, in terms of total pounds, in corn On soybeans, ...

Read More